Speaking and Listening: Sharing and Celebrating Our Work | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA G1:M2:U3:L13

Speaking and Listening: Sharing and Celebrating Our Work

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • SL.1.4: Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
  • SL.1.6: Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation.
  • L.1.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because).

Daily Learning Target

  • I can present information about the sun, moon, and stars to others. (SL.1.4, SL.1.6, L.1.6)
  • I can read my writing aloud using a strong and clear voice. (SL.1.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During each Work Time, observe as students present their work and engage with the classroom visitors. Document progress and mastery of SL.1.4, SL.1.6, and L.1.6 on the Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Sharing the "Sun, Moon, and Stars" Song (5minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Speaking and Listening: Sharing Information about Patterns in the Sky (10 minutes)

B. Reading Aloud: Sharing Our "What the Sun Sees" Poems (20 minutes)

C. Reading Aloud: Sharing Our Sky Notebooks (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. End of Module Reflection (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson serves as the module culmination. Students share two songs, their narrative poems, Sky notebooks, and other learning from the module with visitors. Sharing and celebrating work supports students’ speaking and listening skills and cultivates a sense of pride and ownership in their work.
  • During Work Time A, students share what they learned about observable patterns in the sky. Depending on your class size, consider either allotting extra instructional time to this portion of the lesson (so each student gets to answer every question) or assigning students within a small group to answer specific questions.
  • During the Closing and Assessment, students reflect on their learning using the End of Module Reflection form. This gives them time to formally keep track of and reflect on their own learning and supports metacognition and pride in work and learning.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • The structure of the lesson allows students to present songs, knowledge, and writing learned throughout the module. After presenting, students reflect on what they have learned in the module.
  • Continue to use Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may feel uncomfortable sharing their writing with visitors. Remind them that they had time to practice in the previous lesson. Provide support and encouragement as necessary by asking a supportive adult in the school to sit near students who may need extra help.
  • During the Closing and Assessment, some students may have difficulty recalling something they have learned or are proud of. Encourage them to use visuals around the room to prompt their memory if needed. Some students may need extra time to complete the reflection. Consider offering dictation support or carving out an additional few minutes during the day for them to finish.

Down the road:

  • This is the final lesson of this module.

In Advance

  • Determine small groups for presentations and prepare the Presentation Groups chart.
  • Prepare:
    • Questions sheet (see supporting materials).
    • Clipboards with the End of Module Reflection form for the Closing.
  • Distribute “What the Sun Sees” poem templates, Sky notebooks, and Question sheet in designated areas for each small group.
  • Post: Learning targets, “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song, Sun Movement chart, Moon Movement chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: If you recorded students singing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song in Unit 1, play these recordings for them to join in with.
  • Work Time A: Record each presentation group sharing information about the patterns in the sky and post it on a teacher webpage or a portfolio app such as Seesaw for students to listen to at home with their families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Work Time B: Record students sharing their “What the Sun Sees” poems and post it on a teacher web page or a portfolio app such as Seesaw for students to listen to at home with their families.
  • Work Time C: Record students sharing their Sky notebooks and post it on a teacher web page or on a portfolio app such as Seesaw for students to listen to at home with their families.
  • Closing A: Students complete the End of Module Reflection recording form using a word-processing tool, such as a Google Doc.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.C.9 and 1.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the opportunity to use oral language in a structured way, and through the opportunity to celebrate and take pride in their hard work.
  • ELLs may find it challenging or intimidating to speak in front of an audience. Consider offering choice in terms of what group they will be presenting with and/or which order they will present in.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Some students may be confused about why unfamiliar people will be participating in class during this lesson. Be clear that everyone is a friend and that they are visiting because they want to see the work the class has been doing. Check that all students understand what to expect so that no one is surprised or stressed by the visitors.

For heavier support:

  • Allow time to rehearse several entries from the Sky notebooks, information about patterns in the sky, and the “What the Sun Sees” poems. Practicing sharing with a peer or small group before sharing with visitor(s) provides a safe, low-risk environment for students as they build oral language and presentation skills.
  • Consider allowing more time for the presentations if needed.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): When sharing and celebrating culminating work with visitors, it is important to also document the group’s learning processes. You can highlight aspects of the learning and writing process that were important in this unit by explaining verbally and/or by displaying photo documentation with captions that describe how students learned about the sun, moon, and stars.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): As students begin the end of module reflection, vary methods for fine motor responses by offering options for drawing utensils (e.g., thick markers or colored pencils) and writing tools (e.g., fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards). Some students may forget their sentence ideas once they begin directing their efforts toward writing. Support strategy development by modeling how to physically touch the words/spaces on the sentence frame and draw lines for additional words you intend to write. This will help students recall their original ideas throughout the writing process.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During the celebration of work, some students may experience anxiety or be uncomfortable sharing in front of a group. Minimize these threats and support self-regulation by inviting students to share in a smaller group setting with one or two visitors. This will support them in developing coping skills.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

Review:

  • astronomer, reflect (L)

Materials

  • “Sun, Moon, and Stars”  song (from Unit 1, Lesson 3; one to display)
  • Presentation Groups chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • Questions sheet (one per visitor)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • “What the Sun Sees” poem (completed in Lesson 11; one per student)
  • Sun Movement chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 2; one to display)
  • Sky notebooks (completed in Unit 2; one per student)
  • Moon Movement chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 10; one to display)
  • End of Module Reflection recording form (one per student)
  • Pencils (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Sharing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” Song (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group area.
  • Welcome the visitors!
  • Tell students that today is an exciting day because they are going to share lots of learning from their sun, moon, and stars study with their visitors. They will begin by sharing songs they have learned.
  • Invite students to stand up.
  • Display the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song.
  • Invite students to join you as sing the song and complete the accompanying hand motions.
  • Repeat this process with the “Moon” song.
  • Invite the visitors to applaud the students’ performance.
  • Provide differentiated mentors by seating students who may be more confident reading and singing aloud near students who may not feel as confident. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: To put students at ease, consider introducing the visitors by quickly identifying them in groups according to their roles within the community. As you name each group, the visitors can stand up, smile, and wave to the class. (Example: “We want to welcome our visitors today. Some of our visitors work at the school—we have teachers, students, administrators, and staff. Other visitors are family members, etc.”)
  • For ELLs: Some students may benefit from building their confidence by practicing speaking in front of others. Consider choosing a student to introduce the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song that will be sung and inviting the rest of the students to stand up to sing them.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Speaking and Listening: Sharing Information about Patterns in the Sky (10 minutes)

  • Tell students and visitors that the students have learned a great deal about patterns that we observe in the sky.
  • Remind students that they also learned about astronomers and briefly review the definition of astronomer (a scientist who studies the sky, the universe, and beyond).
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did we do that is similar to what astronomers do?” (We observed pictures and videos of the sun, moon, and stars; we wrote about our observations; we wrote about and described patterns we observed in the sky; and we shared information about those patterns with each other.)

  • Tell students that now they get to share the work they did that is similar to astronomers by sharing information they have learned throughout the module!
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • “I can present information about the sun, moon, and stars to others.”
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“When you are answering questions from the visitors, what is it important that you remember to do?” (speak clearly and loudly, make eye contact with visitors, listen as others share)

  • Tell students they now will share information about the sun, moon, and stars with the visitors, and they will answer questions from the visitors:
  • Tell students that they will gather in small presentation groups with a few other classmates and one or two visitors.
  • Once in their groups, they will take turns answering questions from the visitors.
  • Remind students that they practiced answering these questions in the previous lesson.
  • Move students into pre-determined groups using the Presentation Groups chart.
  • Once groups are settled in designated areas, direct visitors’ attention to the Questions sheet in front of them.
  • Tell visitors that they should take turns asking each of the questions on the sheet. Remind students that they will take turns answering the questions in the order in which the students are listed on the Presentation Groups chart.
  • Invite a visitor to ask the first student in the group the first question.
  • Circulate as students answer questions and offer guidance and support as necessary.
  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track students’ progress towards the targeted standards.
  • Provide frequent time checks so students and visitors anticipate cleanup.
  • With 2 minutes remaining, signal students to clean up.
  • For students who may need support with self-regulatory skills: Help students to anticipate and manage anxiety or worry about answering questions from visitors by modeling what to do if they need help. (Example: “I can remember if I get nervous when I am sharing, I can take a deep breath to relax. And if I can’t remember what I was going to say, I can ask a classmate to help me.”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Some students may benefit from building their confidence by speaking in front of others. In this section, consider choosing a student to announce that they now will present their information about the sun, moon, and stars with the visitors in small groups and that afterward they will answer questions from the visitors.
  • For ELLs: To help students feel more comfortable in their small groups, consider doing a quick round of introductions of the visitors and students in the small groups, before starting the presentations.
  • For ELLs: Consider having students who need more support choose which questions they want to answer beforehand, so they can practice their answers and build confidence. Be sure to let the visitors know of this accommodation, so they know which questions to ask those particular students.

B. Reading Aloud: Sharing Our “What the Sun Sees” Poems (20 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group and offer students specific, positive feedback on the information they shared. (Example: “I noticed that Jonah and Janis made eye contact with visitors while they answered their questions and shared a lot of important information about the patterns that the moon follows.”)
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:
    • “I can read my writing aloud using a strong and clear voice.”
  • Tell students that they now will share their “What the Sun Sees” poems with the visitors. Remind them that they practiced reading their poems during the last lesson.
  • Briefly review the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“While other students are sharing, what should you do?” (keep voices off, listen carefully, look at the speaker)

  • Tell students they will remain in the same small groups and follow the same order for sharing their poems as they did for answering questions.
  • Remind students that once the first reader has shared, they should move to the second reader, and so on until all the students in the group have shared.
  • Ask the visitors to help keep the group moving along and offer support as needed.
  • Direct students’ attention to their “What the Sun Sees” poems and encourage the first student to stand up and begin sharing.
  • Circulate as students share and offer guidance and support as necessary.
  • Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist as appropriate to gather evidence of students’ progress.
  • Provide frequent time checks so students and visitors anticipate cleanup.
  • With 2 minutes remaining, signal students to clean up and neatly place their “What the Sun Sees” poems back where they found them.
  • Refocus whole group. Give students specific, positive feedback on sharing their poems with the visitors. (Example: “I noticed that you did a great job of speaking clearly and loudly while you read your poem.”
  • As a celebration of students’ sharing, display the Sun Movement chart. Invite students to join you as you complete the Sun Movement routine.
  • Invite students to be seated again.
  • To support engagement, strategically order students to ensure they have a strong, politely helpful model to support their efforts at sharing their poem with visitors. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Some students may benefit from building their confidence by speaking in front of others. In this section, consider choosing a student to read the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart.
  • For ELLs: Consider pairing students with a buddy for support as they read their “What the Sun Sees” poems.

C. Reading Aloud: Sharing Our Sky Notebooks (15 minutes)

  • Remind students and visitors that the students’ narrative poems were just one part of the work they did during this module.
  • Tell students that now they get to share the work they did making and writing and drawing about observations of videos and pictures of the sun and moon by sharing their Sky notebooks!
  • Tell students they will remain in the same small groups and follow the same order for sharing their Sky notebooks as they did their “What the Sun Sees” poems.
  • Direct students’ attention to their Sky notebooks and invite them to open to the pages they selected to share during the previous lesson.
  • Invite the first student in each group to begin sharing.
  • Circulate as students share and offer guidance and support as necessary.
  • Provide frequent time checks so students and visitors anticipate cleanup.
  • With 2 minutes remaining, signal students to clean up.
  • Refocus whole group. Give students specific, positive feedback on sharing their Sky notebooks. (Example: “I noticed that Jeremiah and Kiara listened closely as the other members of their group shared their Sky notebook entries.”)
  • As a celebration of students’ sharing, display the Moon Movement chart. Invite students to join you as you complete the Moon Movement routine.
  • To support self-regulation and independence during a transition: Provide a clear routine for what will happen as this activity concludes and use a visual time timer. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider pairing students with a buddy for support as they read the Sky notebook entries they selected.
  • For ELLs: Some students may benefit from building their confidence by speaking in front of others. In this section, consider choosing a student to read the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Module Reflection (10 minutes)

  • Once the visitors have left, refocus whole group.
  • Tell students that they will now have a chance to reflect on all of the thinking and learning they did during this module. Remind students that reflect means to think about something we have done or learned.
  • Display the End of Module Reflection recording form and read the first prompt aloud:
    • “One thing I learned about the sun, moon, or stars is _____.”
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What is something you have learned about the sun, moon, or stars in this module?” (Responses will vary, but may include: The sun looks like it moves across the sky; the moon seems to change shape; the stars shine all the time, but we can only see them during the night.)

  • Tell students that now they will have a chance to draw a picture and write a sentence to show one thing they learned about the sun, moon, or stars during this module.
  • Distribute prepared clipboards with the End of Module Reflection recording form attached and pencils to each student.
  • Direct students’ attention to the first prompt using the displayed End of Module Reflection recording form. Invite students to put their finger on it and invite them to begin writing and drawing about one thing they learned about the sun, moon, or stars.
  • As students draw and write, circulate and ask them to tell you what they learned.
  • After a few minutes, repeat this process with the second prompt on the recording form:
    • “One way I showed respect or integrity as a learner is ______.”
  • As students draw and write, circulate and ask them to tell you how they showed respect or integrity.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their hard work and thinking. (Example: “Patterns in the sky is a challenging topic to learn about, and Tim was able to write down one big idea about the sun.”)
  • If time permits, close the lesson by singing a song from the module.
  • Tell students that in the coming days, they will begin a new module on another exciting topic to study!
  • Offer partial or full dictation as students verbally share their reflections. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Provide help for students to write their End of Module Reflection form by pointing them to resources around the room that will help them write, or by taking dictation on what they want to write.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up