Introducing Feel the Beats | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA GK:S1:C2:L14

Introducing Feel the Beats

You are here:

Daily Learning Target

  • Work Time A and B: I can identify the name and sound for the letters “h,” “p,” “a,” and “t.” (RF.K.3)
    • I can identify the name of each uppercase letter.
    • I can look at each consonant and say its sound.
  • Work Time A: I can feel and count the syllables (beats) in the words of a poem. (RF.K.2)
    • I can count the syllables in a spoken word.
    • I can segment (break apart) and pronounce separate syllables in a spoken word.
    • I can blend separate syllables to form a spoken word.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Observe students during Work Time A.
    • Determine whether they can identify the number of syllables in spoken words.
    • Also determine whether they can pronounce each individual syllable, blend them, and segment them.
  • Record students’ progress on the Snapshot Assessment.

Agenda

Agenda

1. Opening (5 minutes)

A. Letter-Sound Chant: “h,” “p,” “a,” and “t”

2. Work Time (10–15 minutes)

A. Introducing Feel the Beats

3. Closing and Assessment (2 minutes)

A. Reflecting on Learning

4. Differentiated Small Group Instruction and Rotations (40-45 minutes)

In Advance

  • Prepare Snapshot Assessment (optional; one per student).
  • Gather materials for differentiated small group instruction (see Differentiated Small Groups: Work with Teacher).

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

  • beat, blend, syllable (L)
  • swooped (T)

Materials

  • Enlarged poem: “A Pink Parrot Took My Hat!” (to display; from Lesson 11)
  • Large pointer (optional; for teacher to point to words in poem as the class recites)
  • Articulatory Gestures chart (from Lesson 13)
  • Snapshot Assessment (optional; one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Letter-Sound Chant: “h,” “p,” “a,” and “t”

  • (Suggested transition song, sung to the tune of “I’m a Little Teapot”):

“Now let’s say the alphabet, letter by letter. Here is the letter, here is the sound. When we chant together, we sound great. Listen up to the sounds we make!”

  • Begin the Letter-Sound Chant instructional practice:

1. Teacher says: “Today, we will do a Letter-Sound Chant with ALL the letters we have learned so far.”

2.Teacher models the Letter-Sound Chant for “h”: “‘h,’ house, /h/,” and repeats.

3. Teacher asks students to join in the Letter-Sound Chant for “h”: “‘h,’ house, /h/,” and repeats.

4. Repeat steps 2–3 with “p,” “a,” and “t.”

5. Teacher says: “Great job! Knowing the sounds for letters helps us become better readers.”

  • Invite students to feel how their mouths and tongues move and where the breath is released when pronouncing each sound.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing Feel the Beats

  • (Suggested transition song, sung to the tune of “I’m a Little Teapot”):

“Let’s count the syllables, beat by beat. Tap your fingers and drum in your seat. When we hear a syllable, we will tap. Try it out with a rat-a-tat-tat.”

  • Introduce Feel the Beats instructional practice:

1. Teacher reads the Enlarged poem: “A Pink Parrot Took My Hat!” once, pointing to each word as he or she reads it (with a finger or a pointer) with expression.

2. While reading, teacher draws students’ attention to the rhythm and syllables (beats) by tapping each beat under the word.

3. Teacher says: “There’s a wonderful rhythm and beat in this poem! Let’s see if we can feel it in our bodies and mouths.”

4. Teacher models how to make little drumsticks with two fingers from each hand: tap together the index and middle fingers of the right hand against the same two fingers of the left.

5. Students practice tapping.

6. Students and teachers recite the entire poem aloud slowly, tapping the rhythm and beats on their fingers.

7. Teacher recites the first two lines of the poem again while tapping as students listen: “I walked out of my house, ready for the day when I saw a big pink parrot flying my way.”

8. Teacher invites students to say the word “parrot” aloud, tapping out each beat.

9. Teacher asks:

“How many beats are in the word ‘parrot’?” (two)

10. Teacher says: “That’s right. There are two beats in the word ‘parrot.’ There is a special name for each beat in a word. We call those beats ‘syllables.’”

11. Teacher asks:

“What is the first syllable in the word ‘parrot’?” (“par”)

“What is the second syllable in the word ‘parrot’?” (“rot”)

12. Repeat steps 8–11 with the words “flying” and “way.”

13. Work Time (continued)

Teacher says: “Some words have one syllable or beat, like the word ‘way.’ And some words have more than one syllable or beat. The word ‘parrot’ has two: ‘par’-‘rot.’”

14. Repeat steps 7–11 with the poem’s remaining lines, using the words “little,” “pat,” and “anything.”

15. Teacher says: “Now let’s play a game. I’ll say each syllable in a word, and you blend them together to say the word they make.

16. ”Teacher says: “sur-prised.”

17. Student(s) say: “surprised.”

18. Repeat steps 16–17 with two or three more multisyllabic words from the poem.

  • It can be challenging for young students to differentiate the number of beats in a spoken word from the number of printed words on a page. Many students expect that the finger will move on after each beat when pointing to words in a text. In this lesson, tapping each beat in a word with two or more syllables directly under the word lays the groundwork for understanding the difference between “beats” (syllables) and words.
  • For students who have difficulty managing the timing and coordination involved in physically marking each beat in spoken words: Allow them to recite it slowly instead.
  • Consider substituting the tapping of fingers with marching in place or gently slapping a knee with one hand for students who need a more gross motor method.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning

  • Emphasize that successful learners think about what they’ve learned and why it’s important. Consider using a metaphor, such as a baseball player learning to keep his or her eye on the ball to know exactly when to hit it.
  • Ask:

“When we listen to or say a word like ‘anything,’ how can we figure out how many syllables it has?” (Say it, listen for each “beat,” hold up a finger each time a new beat is heard.)

“How might that help us with reading or writing?” (Responses will vary.)

  • For students who need additional support organizing their ideas: Provide sentence frames. Examples:
    • “When I said the word _____, I _____.”

Differentiated Small Groups: Work with Teacher

Suggested Plan: Teacher works with the Pre-Alphabetic and Early Partial Alphabetic groups. Teacher may meet briefly with the Late Partial and Early Full Alphabetic groups to get them started on independent work.

Note: Groups not working with the teacher at a given time should be engaged in purposeful independent rotation work. Refer to the Independent and Small Group Work guidance document (see K–2 Skills Resource Manual) for more details.

Pre-Alphabetic:

  • Practice activity: Teacher guides students as they tap out each beat in the first two lines of the poem: “A Pink Parrot Took My Hat!” as they recite it. Students work with the teacher to determine the number of syllables (beats) in a specific word. They continue the process with the remaining lines, if time allows.

OR:

  • Suggested Activity Bank activity:
    • Syllable Say Animal Feed (with teacher)

Early Partial Alphabetic:

  • Practice activity: Teacher guides students as they tap out each beat in the first two lines of the poem: “A Pink Parrot Took My Hat!” as they recite it. Students work with the teacher to determine the number of syllables (beats) in a specific word. They continue the process with the remaining lines, if time allows.

OR:

  • Suggested Activity Bank activity:
    • Syllable Say Animal Feed (with teacher)

Late Partial and Early Full Alphabetic:

  • Independent practice activity: Students practice reciting the poem: “A Pink Parrot Took My Hat!” and tapping the beats with their fingers a few times. Then they read the poem aloud in their poetry notebooks and indicate the number of syllables under each word. Example:
    • Under the word “pat,” students will make one line, while under the word “parrot,” they will make two.

OR:

  • Suggested Activity Bank activity:
    • Syllable Say Animal Feed (independently)
  • Additional Supporting Materials:
    • Poetry notebooks (from Lesson 11; one per student)

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up