Speaking, Listening, and Writing: Giving and Receiving Peer Feedback | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M4:U3:L10

Speaking, Listening, and Writing: Giving and Receiving Peer Feedback

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.K.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.6: Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.
  • L.K.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on kindergarten reading and content.
  • L.K.4b: Use the most frequently occurring inflections and affixes (e.g., -ed, -s, re-, un-, pre-, -ful, -less) as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can give and receive feedback to ensure we create high-quality work. (SL.K.1a, SL.K.6)
  • I can track the progress of my artwork through writing and drawing. (W.K.8, SL.K.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • As students engage with the poem in the Opening and inflectional endings game in Work Time B, use the Language Checklist to track student progress toward L.K.4b (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • As students give and receive peer feedback in Work Time A, use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to collect data on student progress toward SL.K.1a, SL.K.4, and SL.K.6 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Poem and Movement: "The Cat, the Tree, and Me" (10 minutes)

B. Engaging the Learner: Inflectional Endings Game (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Giving and Receiving Feedback: Watercoloring (15 minutes)

B. Engaging the Artist: Watercoloring (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Independent Writing: Performance Task Art Planner (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Work Time A, students participate in giving and receiving peer feedback on their watercolors that they started in Lesson 7, using the High-Quality Work anchor chart and the Model Performance Task: Tree Appreciation card as references for their feedback. Students then implement the feedback in Work Time C as they continue working on their watercoloring for the performance task art.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Students continue to work with the poem "The Cat, the Tree, and Me" from Lesson 6 and the inflectional endings game from Lesson 7 as they practice using inflectional endings as clues to the meaning of unknown words (L.K.4b).
  • Students continue watercoloring for their performance task art using the paintings begun in Lesson 7.
  • In the Closing, students complete the next entry in the Performance Task Art planner begun in Lesson 5.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • In Work Time A, students give and receive feedback about their watercoloring. Consider pairing students with varying levels of language proficiency. The students with greater language proficiency can serve as models in their partnership, initiating discussion and providing implicit sentence frames.
  • In Work Time C, students work to revise and implement the feedback about their watercoloring. It may be challenging for students to decide which suggestions to implement. Consider modeling the process with another adult before inviting students to add layers to a watercolor painting.
  • During independent writing in the Closing, remind students to use the classroom resources to improve their writing, such as Word Walls, anchor charts, and texts. Consider allowing students to select a work area in the room that allows them to best use the resources they need.

Down the road:

  • Work Time in Lesson 11 can be repeated as an optional Lesson 12 "flex day" to give students more time to complete their artwork at a high-quality level.
  • In Lessons 11 and 12, students will finish watercoloring to add the final layers to complete their art piece for the performance task. 
  • In Lesson 11, students will complete the Performance Task Art planner with a final reflection about their art.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Student workspaces for sketching in Work Time C by placing Performance Task Artwork templates and watercoloring supplies at each.
    • Performance Task Art planners by attaching student copies to clipboards for use in the Closing.
  • Partner students for giving and receiving peer feedback in Work Time A.
  • Post: Learning targets, "The Cat, the Tree, and Me," and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided by in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.C.10, and K.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by cycling back to the inflectional endings game to reinforce prior learning and highlight the ending -ed.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to understand how the inflectional ending changes the word. To offer additional exposure and practice with the words, consider writing them on sentence strips. Cut the strips in two pieces, one with the root word and the other with its inflectional ending. After reading the poem, have students go to their tables and in pairs correctly match, say, and pantomime the root words alone and then with their inflectional endings.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During the Opening, invite students to circle and read the words with the inflectional endings -ed, guiding them if necessary. Ask them to consider how those words change without the inflectional ending.

For heavier support:

  • During the Opening and Work Time C, add the words to the inflectional endings T-chart created in Lesson 7, color-code the endings, and briefly review all the words using call and response.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Before students begin each activity, continue to support information processing by offering explicit prompts for each step students will complete, and invite students to verbally restate the steps they will follow.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to help students monitor their own progress by asking questions that guide self-monitoring and reflection during each learning activity.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Continue to include opportunities to refocus students' attention to the learning target throughout the lesson, and invite students to share how each learning activity is supporting their instructional goal.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • waved, twirled, danced, pounced (T)

Review:

  • inflectional ending, high-quality, peer feedback, watercolor (L)

Materials

  • "The Cat, the Tree, and Me" (from Lesson 6; one to display)
  • Language Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Peer Feedback Protocol anchor chart (begun in Module 2)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (begun in Module 3)
  • Performance Task Artwork template (begun in Lesson 4; added to during Work Time C; one per student; see Teaching Notes)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Model Performance Task: Tree Appreciation card (from Lesson 1; one to display; see Performance Task Overview)
  • Model Watercolor 2 (one to display; see Performance Task Overview)
  • Tree parts images (from Unit 1, Lesson 6; one per student and one to display)
  • Watercoloring supplies:
    • Palettes (one per student)
    • Cups of water (one or two per workspace)
    • Paintbrushes (one per student)
    • Paper towel (one sheet per student)
  • Clipboards (one per student)
  • Performance Task Art planner (begun in Lesson 5; added to during Work Time B; one per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Pencils (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Poem and Movement: "The Cat, the Tree, and Me" (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group. 
  • Display "The Cat, the Tree, and Me" poem and read the title.
  • Follow the same routine established in Modules 1-3 to read "The Cat, the Tree, and Me":
    • Direct students' attention to the posted poem.
    • Invite them to read along as you point to the text and act out their motions.
  • Point to the words with the inflectional endings -less and -ful in the poem. As you point to each, invite students to stand up and act out the meaning.
  • Consider using the Language Checklist to track student progress toward L.K.4b.
  • Tell students that there is another type of inflectional ending in this poem: -ed.
  • Remind students that they learned about this inflectional ending during the Language Dive in Lesson 2 for "We Planted a Tree" and that when -ed is added to the end of a word, it means that it happened in the past.
  • Tell students that the author of this poem is telling a story from when she was a little girl, so this poem is in the past: "When I was just a little girl ..."
  • Reread the poem and underline the words using the inflectional ending -ed and invite students to act out the meaning of each:
    • waved: moved it back and forth
    • twirled: caused it to spin
    • danced: moved it in a rhythmic way
    • pounced: jumped on
  • If time permits, reread the poem and invite students to create a signal for the words with the inflectional ending -ed that shows they happened in the past (pointing over your shoulder).
  • For ELLs: (Recalling Language Dive) Invite students to consider the words with the inflectional ending -ed that they shared in the Language Dive in Lesson 2.
  • For students who may need additional support with language: Provide visual display of root words and inflectional ending using prepared index cards to join the ending to root word. (MMR)

B. Engaging the Learner: Inflectional Endings Game (5 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Remind students that they learned the inflectional ending -ful with the poem "The Cat, the Tree, and Me" in the previous lesson.
  • Use the same routine from Opening B of Lesson 7 to lead students through the inflectional endings game: 
    • Say the root word aloud: "help"
    • Tell students that when you say the word with an inflectional ending attached, they should stand up and act out the new meaning with a partner.
    • Say the word: "helpful."
    • Invite students to stand up and act out being helpful with a partner (e.g., acting as though you are helping your partner do something: tie their shoe, button their jacket, etc.).
    • Say the root word: "power."
    • Tell students that when you say the word with an inflectional ending attached, students can stand up and act out the new meaning with a partner.
    • Say the word: "powerful."
    • Invite students to stand up and act out being powerful with a partner (e.g., acting like a superhero; doing push-ups, etc.).
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: (Clarifying Word Meaning and Inflectional Ending Function) When you say the root words, demonstrate the meaning of that word with a gesture or picture to clarify the meaning and also draw a distinction between the root word and what happens when you add -less or -ful. (MMR)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Giving and Receiving Feedback: Watercoloring (15 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group; direct their attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

"I can give and receive feedback to ensure we create high-quality work."

  • Direct students' attention to the Peer Feedback Protocol anchor chart and review the big ideas. As needed, remind students the definitions of kind, helpful, and specific.
  • Direct students' attention to the High-Quality Work anchor chart and reread the big ideas. 
  • Tell students that today they will be giving each other feedback about their watercolors for the performance task.
  • Remind them that their feedback should be related to the ideas on the High-Quality Work anchor chart, especially: 
    • "carefully planned and include details"
  • Remind students that they cannot take paint off of their watercolor paintings, but that they can add more or add layers.
  • Consider modeling giving and receiving feedback with another adult to support the process.
  • Distribute Performance Task Artwork templates.
  • Invite students to partner up with their pre-determined partners and begin giving and receiving feedback about each other's watercolor paintings.
  • Circulate and listen as students provide peer feedback. Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to take note of students' discussion. As needed, redirect them using the Peer Feedback Protocol anchor chart.
  • Prompt students to support their feedback using criteria from the High-Quality Work anchor chart.
  • After both partners have shared and offered feedback, refocus whole group.
  • Provide specific, positive feedback on students' ability to give kind, specific, and helpful feedback about each other's watercolor paintings.
  • Tell students that after a quick movement break, they will have time to make revisions and changes to their watercolor paintings.
  • For ELLs: (Recalling Prior Work: Learning Target) Invite students to discuss how they previously worked toward this learning target.
  • For ELLs (Fishbowl: Demonstrating Learning) Now that the class has had repeat exposure to the process, invite students who might have initially struggled with giving oral feedback to model how to do it in a fishbowl.
  • For students who may need additional support with auditory processing: Invite students to brainstorm different words and phrases they could use to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to their partner. Write the words and phrases on chart paper and encourage students to refer to it as they work with their partners. (MMR, MMAE)

B. Engaging the Artist: Watercoloring (20 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • With excitement, share with students that they will now continue watercoloring for the performance task artwork.
  • Remind students that they will have multiple days to create their best watercolor paintings, so they should take their time, which means they might finish only part of the painting today.
  • Display the Model Performance Task: Tree Appreciation card and invite students to look closely at the artwork.
    • Focus students on the tree part on the card and tell them that today they will begin watercoloring the tree part in their sketch.
    • Remind them that they should think carefully about the colors they will need to make their painting both realistic and beautiful.
  • Display Model Watercolor 2 and trace your finger over the yellow vein of the leaf. Remind students that when you watercolor, you should start with the lightest color and then add the darker colors.
    • Tell students that watercoloring a realistic and beautiful painting takes time. Just like this artist, students may have time to paint only part of the tree part.
    • Display the tree parts image that corresponds with Model Watercolor 2.
    • Turn and Talk:

"How did the artist use the watercoloring routine to ensure that the art was beautiful and realistic?" (The artist first used the lightest color, yellow; the artist used realistic colors; the artist stayed within the lines; etc.)

  • Tell students that their Performance Task Artwork templates, tree parts images, and the watercoloring supplies are at their workspaces.
    • Transition students to their workspaces and invite them to begin watercoloring by following the same routine from Unit 2.
    • Circulate to support students as they watercolor.
    • After about 15 minutes, invite students to clean up carefully, put all materials back in the appropriate locations, and return to the whole group meeting area.
    • Tell students that they will continue to work on their watercoloring for the performance task artwork in upcoming lessons.
  • For ELLs: (Receiving Positive and Corrective Feedback) As you circulate during the Turn and Talk and watercoloring, make note of one correct and one incorrect use of syntax and/or vocabulary. At the end of Work Time B, without attributing the examples, guide students in a brief review of each. 
  • For students who may need additional support with sustained effort: Invite students to take a quick finger-stretch break once or twice throughout the work time. (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Independent Writing: Performance Task Art Planner (10 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second aloud:

"I can track the progress of my artwork through writing and drawing."

  • Distribute the prepared clipboards with the Performance Task Art planner attached and pencils.
  • Focus students on the checklist on the cover page. 
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What parts of the performance task artwork have we completed?" (watercoloring the tree part)

  • Model how to draw a check mark in the box next to the words "watercolor the tree part."
  • Invite students to check off "watercolor the tree part" on their Performance Task Art planners.
  • Tell students to open the Performance Task Art planners to page 4.
  • Remind students that in the first box they will write and draw about something they did today while creating the art, and in the second box they will write and draw about something they will do tomorrow.
  • Invite students to begin writing and drawing.
  • After a few minutes, refocus whole group.
  • Provide specific, positive feedback on students' abilities to think strategically about the work they have done and the work they will do in the future.
  • Tell students that in the upcoming lessons they will begin the watercoloring routine to complete their performance task art.
  • For ELLs: (Oral Language: Exchanging Ideas) Before students write and draw what they did in this lesson, invite them to discuss their ideas with a partner. After they are done, invite them to explain what they've done with a different partner.

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