Reading and Writing: Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Oliver’s Tree | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M4:U1:L6

Reading and Writing: Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Oliver’s Tree

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.3: With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
  • RL.K.4: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.9: With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.
  • W.K.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.K.2: Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • LK.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • LK.1b: Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
  • L.K.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • L.K.2a: Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
  • L.K.2b: Recognize and name end punctuation.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can identify and describe the characters, settings, and major events using key details from the text Oliver's Tree. (RL.K. 1, RL.K.3, RL.K.9)
  • I can describe the different ways people can enjoy trees. (W.K.8, SL.K.4, L.K.1b, L.K.2a, L.K.2b, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the read-aloud in Work Time A, use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track student progress toward SL.K.2 and the Reading Literature Checklist to track progress toward RL.K.1, RL.K.2, and RL.K.3 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Continue to collect students' Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1 and use the Language Checklist to track progress toward W.K.8, L.K.1b, L.K.2a, L.K.2b, and L.K.6 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Unit 1 Guiding Question Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

2. Work Time 

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Oliver's Tree (20 minutes)

B.  Engaging the Artist: Introducing Pencil Sketching (20 minutes)

C. Independent Writing: Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1 (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment 

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol: Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: 

  • In Work Time A, students begin a new focused read-aloud with the text Oliver's Tree. Similar to the previous read-aloud, they will continue to use a Character Comparison anchor chart and to build comprehension by asking and answering questions about the characters, setting, and major events (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.3).
  • The pages of Oliver's Tree are not numbered. For instructional purposes, the page that begins with "Once, there were three friends" should be considered page 2 and all pages thereafter numbered accordingly.
  • In Work Time B, students begin to learn how to sketch to prepare them for their performance task in Unit 3. After choosing a tree parts image to sketch, students use descriptive language to talk about what their image looks like, as well as ways people could enjoy that part of the tree (SL.K.4).

How this lesson builds on previous work: 

  • Students continue to write and sketch about ways to enjoy trees in their Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1. 

Areas in which students may need additional support: 

  • During sketching in Work Time B and independent writing in Work Time C, consider providing alternative writing tools (e.g., thicker pencils, pencil grips, slant boards, etc.) to students who need support with fine motor tasks.

Down the road: 

  • In Lesson 7, students complete the Middle and End rows of the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree.
  • In Lessons 8-9, students will use the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree to complete the Unit 1 Assessment (RL.K.9, SL.K.2). 
  • Students continue to sketch in Lessons 7-9. In Lesson 8, they learn to outline a chosen sketch in black ink. This instruction prepares them for the performance task in Unit 3.

In Advance

  • Create a space to store student sketches so they are easily accessible for Lessons 7-9. 
  • Prepare:
    • Materials to model sketching in Work Time B: model tree part image, model pencil sketch 1, and paper.
    • Student workspaces with materials for sketching in Work Time B: tree parts images, pencils, and paper.
    • Trees Are Important Word Wall card for treehouse. 
    • Student workspaces with materials for independent writing in Work Time C: Enjoying Trees journal, pencils, and colored pencils.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.B.6, K.I.C.12, and K.II.A.1

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to expand their content knowledge and oral language fluency through a focused read-aloud, discussion, and supported writing practice. 
  • ELLs may find it challenging to focus simultaneously on the syntax, vocabulary, and textual analysis in the story. Give students wait time to process the text you read. Spend a few moments to view the illustrations and discuss how they support the text (see levels of support and the Meeting Students' Needs column).

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time A, consider stopping to ask a student to model a question about the text and then ask the rest of the students to discuss in pairs what they think the answer could be.

For heavier support:

  • For students who have difficulty articulating their ideas in Work Time C, offer them additional opportunities to discuss the image with you or a partner. Consider suggesting a longer sentence frame and providing index cards with key vocabulary to support their responses.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Continue to embed support for unfamiliar vocabulary by providing explanation and visual examples. This will help students make connections and support comprehension.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to support strategy development during independent writing by modeling how to physically touch the spaces on the paper and draw lines for the words you intend to write.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Continue to foster collaboration and community by providing prompts that guide students in knowing when and how to ask classmates or teachers for help.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • sketching, treehouse (L)

Review:

  • comparison, enjoy (L)

Materials

  • Unit 1 Guiding Question anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Asking Questions to Understand a Story anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Oliver's Tree (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Reading Literature Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree (example, for teacher reference)
  • Model tree parts image (one for teacher modeling)
  • Model of pencil sketch 1 (one for teacher modeling)
  • Paper (blank; several pieces per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Pencils (one per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Tree parts images (one set per workspace)
  • Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1 (begun in Lesson 2; added to during Work Time C; page 4; one per student)
  • Enjoying Trees image 4 (one to display)
  • Colored pencils (variety of colors per student)
  • Trees Are Important Word Wall card (new; teacher-created; one)
  • Trees Are Important Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1; added to during Work Time C)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol anchor chart (begun in Module 2)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Unit 1 Guiding Question Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group. 
  • Tell students they have done excellent work discovering different ways trees are important to the community.
  • Direct students' attention to the Unit 1 Guiding Question anchor chart. 
  • Tell students that you will read the anchor chart together to remember the many ways trees are important to the community. 
  • Read aloud each bullet, pausing after each to invite students to think of a motion or hand gesture to show the different ideas. 
  • If time permits, invite students to use their motions and reread the anchor chart.
  • For ELLs: (Partners: Syntax and Vocabulary Fluency) Invite students to select one of the bullets on the anchor chart to practice sharing with a partner using a frame. (Examples: "I think it is interesting that ________" or "We learned that ________.)" Then, encourage students to share what their partners said.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Oliver's Tree (20 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Direct students' attention to the Asking Questions to Understand a Story anchor chart and review its purpose as necessary. 
  • Display the text Oliver's Tree. Tell students that the same person, Kit Chase, was the author and illustrator of the book. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"If Kit Chase was the author and the illustrator, what does that mean that she did?" (wrote the story and drew the pictures)

  • Tell students they will first read through the text to help them understand and enjoy the story. Then they will talk more about it. 
  • Throughout the focused read-aloud, consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track student progress toward SL.K.2 and the Reading Literature Checklist to track progress toward RL.K.1, RL.K.2, and RL.K.3.
  • Read aloud pages 1-18. 
  • Pause at page 19 and tell students that it is always important to stop and make sure you understand what is happening in the story. Point to the "If you ... are confused" section of the Asking Questions to Understand a Story anchor chart. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"Can you please help me understand this major event? Why is Oliver walking away from his friends?" (because they cannot find a tree for him to play in)

Conversation Cue: "Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response? I'll give you time to think." (Responses will vary.) 

  • Read aloud pages 19 to the end.
  • Pause at page 29 and point to the "If you ... don't know what happened in the story" section of the Asking Questions to Understand the Story anchor chart. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What happened in the story when Oliver and his friends were happy again?" (Now all of the friends can play together in a tree.)

Conversation Cue: "Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response? I'll give you time to think." (Responses will vary.) 

  • Tell students that they will now dive deeper into the story.
  • Direct students' attention to the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree and focus them on the two columns labeled Oliver and Charlie/Lulu and the three rows labeled Beginning, Middle, and End.
  • Review comparison (to notice what is the same or different) as needed.
  • Tell students that today they will focus on comparisons of the characters' experiences in the beginning of the book.
  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read the first one aloud:

"I can identify and describe the characters, settings, and major events using key details from the text Oliver's Tree."

  • After completing the read-aloud, return to pages 7-8, 9-10, and 13-16 to show the illustrations and follow the steps below:
    • Invite students to look closely at the illustrations.
    • Turn and Talk:

"What do the illustrations show the characters doing with trees on this page?"

    • Circulate and listen in to identify a student who accurately names what is happening in the illustration. If students need additional support, read the text on the page aloud. 
    • Refocus whole group and invite a student to share out what the illustration shows. 
    • Invite students to quickly stand and act out what happens in the illustration.
    • Repeat this process with the next illustration.
  • Direct students' attention to the Beginning row of the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What does Oliver do in the beginning with trees?" (He tries to play with the trees: He finds one tree that is too small and one tree that is too big, and he breaks the branch of another tree.)

Conversation Cue: "Who can add on to what your classmate said? I'll give you time to think." (Responses will vary.)

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the Beginning row of the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree. Refer to the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Think aloud that Oliver and his friends Charlie and Lulu do different things with trees. Ask:

"What do Charlie and Lulu do in the beginning with trees?" (They climb and hide in trees.)

  • Reread the Beginning section of the anchor chart. Tell students that you will compare and contrast the characters, or find how they are similar or different. Ask:

"What do Oliver and Charlie/Lulu do with trees at the beginning of the story that is the same?" (They all try to play in the trees.)

"What do Oliver and Charlie/Lulu do with trees at the beginning of the story that is different?" (Oliver cannot play in trees, and Charlie and Lulu can.)

  • For ELLs: (Comparing and Contrasting) Invite students, in pairs, to compare and contrast a time when they felt "hopeless" to an event that makes Oliver feel hopeless in the book. (Example: I felt hopeless when I couldn't play on the monkey bars, and Oliver feels hopeless when he is too big to hide in the tree.) 
  • Before reading, provide white boards and white board markers as an option for students to record (in drawing or writing) their ideas. This will also help scaffold active listening for key details. (MMR, MMAE)

B. Engaging the Artist: Introducing Pencil Sketching (20 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group. 
  • Offer specific, positive feedback about how students carefully thought about the characters and main events in Oliver's Tree. 
  • With enthusiasm, tell them that they will use sketching to create art that shows the different parts of trees that people can and should appreciate! 
  • Tell students that a sketch is a quick pencil drawing that artists do to show what an object looks like. Sketches are made using quick, light pencil marks on a page. Artists can later turn their sketches into beautiful pieces of finished art with a little more time and work, which is exactly what students will do. They will use these sketches to create a high-quality performance task in a couple of weeks!
  • Emphasize that sketches are unfinished pieces of work and are not supposed to be perfect. They are supposed to be practice, so making mistakes will actually help students get better and better each time they sketch.
  • Point out that before artists can start, they must look closely at the object or picture they are trying to sketch.
  • Display the model tree parts image and share that you chose it to sketch this picture because the bark looks like paper. 
  • Display the model of pencil sketch 1 and share that this is an example of a sketch and they can use it to learn how to sketch. 
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What do you notice is the same or different between the model of pencil sketch 1 and model tree parts image?" (Responses will vary, but may include: They look the same; one is real and one is a drawing, etc.)

Conversation Cue: "Do you agree or disagree with what your classmate said? Why? I'll give you time to think." (Responses will vary.)

  • Tell students that you will show them the steps they will go through to create their own sketches. 
  • Invite students to pantomime the steps as you model them.
  • Think aloud as you model the following sketching routine on a piece of paper. 

1. Closely observe the model tree parts image.

      • Look at the whole picture and look for shapes.
      • Look from the bottom to the top and say what you notice.
      • Look from side to side and say what you notice.
      • Zoom into one specific spot and notice the types of lines.

2. Trace the spot you chose with your pencil's eraser. 
3. With your eraser, draw the same line or shape on your paper.
4. Draw over the eraser mark lightly with your pencil. 
5. Repeat Steps 2-4 until the image is complete. 
6. Make changes and add details to your sketch as desired.

  • Tell students they will work on their own pencil sketches momentarily. First, direct their attention to the model of pencil sketch 1 and model tree parts image. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What types of lines do you see?" (curved lines and straight lines)

  • On the piece of paper you were using to model, lightly draw a curved line and a straight line. Tell students that they will use many different types of lines as well. 

"What do you notice about the lines? Are they light or dark?" (light)

  • On the paper, show the difference between drawing a dark line using a lot of pressure and a light line using little pressure. Emphasize that it is important to always use light lines in sketches so you can make changes easily if you need to. 
  • Invite students to transition to their workspaces like a leaf floating in the wind, where they will find pencils, paper, and tree parts images. 
  • Tell students to choose an image to sketch. Let them know that they will sketches other images in future sketching sessions, but today they need to choose one image.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What part of the tree did you choose? How could someone enjoy that part of the tree?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Guide students through Step 1 of the sketching routine.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What types of lines and shapes do you notice in your tree part image?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Guide students through Steps 2-6 of the sketching routine. 
  • Tell students that now that they have learned how to sketch, they will have even more time to continue sketching over the next couple of lessons!
  • Invite students to store their sketches in the designated area.
  • For ELLs: (Comparing and Contrasting: Sketches) Invite students to find a partner and compare and contrast their sketches. Model a possible dialogue before they begin. (Example: "My sketch is similar to my partner's sketch because _________. My sketch is different from my partner's sketch because _______.")
  • For students who may need additional support with sustained effort: Invite students to take a quick finger-stretch break once or twice throughout the Work Time. (MME)

C. Independent Writing: Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1 (10 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

"I can describe the different ways people can enjoy trees."

  • Follow the same routine from Work Time C of Lesson 3 to guide students through writing and sketching in their Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1 using the Enjoying Trees image 4 and colored pencils.
    • Before students begin writing, add the Trees Are Important Word Wall card for treehouse (a small structure or building in a tree) to the Trees Are Important Word Wall using the same process established in Modules 1-3.
    • Circulate to support students as they work and use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track their progress toward SL.K.4. 
  • For ELLs: (Summarizing Learning Target) Check for comprehension by asking students to summarize and then to personalize the learning target. 
  • For students who may need additional support with organizing ideas for written expression: Invite students to verbally share their sentences before writing. (MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol: Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group and offer specific, positive feedback on their work describing how people enjoy trees in their Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and remind them of the second one by reading it aloud:

"I can describe different ways people can enjoy trees."

  • Remind students that throughout the lesson, they observed different tree parts and discussed how people might enjoy that part of the tree. They also closely observed a photograph of a child enjoying a treehouse. 
  • Tell students they are going to use the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to share and describe ways people can enjoy trees and to reflect on their learning. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 5 and review as necessary using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol anchor chart. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Guide students through three rounds of the protocol using the following questions:

"What is one way we saw people or characters enjoy trees in today's lesson?"

"Did you meet the target today? What did you do to help yourself meet the learning target?"

"What can you do during our next lesson to help yourself be successful?"

  • For ELLs: (Errors) As students interact, jot down samples of effective communication. Also jot down one or two common language errors (pervasive, stigmatizing, critical). Share each of these with the class, allowing students to take pride in the effective communication and correct the errors. (It's not necessary to identify who communicated well or who made errors; however, consider pulling the student aside to make it clear.)
  • Support communication and engagement by pairing students with strategic partners to ensure that they have a strong, politely helpful partner to support their efforts at sharing. (MME)

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