Reading, Asking Questions, and Writing: Close Read-aloud, Session 2: A Tree for Emmy and Enjoying Trees Journal | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA GK:M4:U1:L3

Reading, Asking Questions, and Writing: Close Read-aloud, Session 2: A Tree for Emmy and Enjoying Trees Journal

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.2: With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
  • RL.K.3: With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
  • RL.K.4: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.5: Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).
  • RL.K.9: With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.
  • W.K.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.K.2: Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • LK.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • LK.1b: Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
  • L.K.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • L.K.2a: Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
  • L.K.2b: Recognize and name end punctuation.
  • L.K.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on kindergarten reading and content.
  • L.K.4a: Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately (e.g., knowing duck is a bird and learning the verb to duck).
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can ask and answer questions about the characters, settings, and major events in the text A Tree for Emmy. (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.3, RL.K.4, RL.K.5, RL.K.9, SL.K.2)
  • I can describe the different ways people can enjoy trees. (W.K.8, SL.K.4, L.K.1b, L.K.2a, L.K.2b, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the close read-aloud in Work Time A, continue to use the Reading Literature Checklist to track students' progress toward RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.3, RL.K.4, RL K.5, and RL K.9 and the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track students' progress toward SL.K.2 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • As students prepare for writing in Work Time C, use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track their progress toward SL.K.4 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Continue to collect the Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1 and use the Language Checklist to track progress toward L.K.1b, L.K.2a, L.K.2b, and L.K.6 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Poem and Movement: "The Many Meanings of Words" (5 minutes)

2. Work Time 

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 2: A Tree for Emmy, Pages 1-13 (20 minutes)

B. Engaging the Learner: Tree Stretch (10 minutes)

C. Independent Writing: Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1 (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment 

A. Pinky Partners Protocol: Ways to Enjoy Trees (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: 

  • This is the second lesson in a series of three in which students participate in a close read-aloud of the text A Tree for Emmy. Recall that students use this read-aloud to build comprehension by asking and answering questions about the characters, setting, and major events in order to compare characters in the story (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.3, RL.K.9).
  • During the close read-aloud in Work Time A, students are introduced to the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: A Tree for Emmy, which allows them to track characters and major events of the story and whether characters' experiences are the same or different (RL.K.9).
  • In Work Time B, students are introduced to the Tree Stretch. This stretch infuses movement, routine, and an opportunity for mastery into students' daily learning.
  • Students continue to think about the Unit 1 guiding question ("How are trees important to others?") as they talk and write about different ways other people enjoy trees.

How this lesson builds on previous work: 

  • In Lesson 2, students began writing and sketching in their Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1. In this lesson, they continue to use their journal to describe ways to enjoy trees.
  • Students continue to reflect on the Unit 1 guiding question through independent writing and the Pinky Partners protocol in the Closing. 
  • Continue to use Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support: 

  • During independent writing in Work Time C, remind students to use the classroom resources such as Word Walls, anchor charts, and texts to improve their writing. Consider allowing students to select a work area in the room that allows them to best use the resources they need.

Down the road: 

  • In Lesson 4, students will continue the close read-aloud of A Tree for Emmy and use the information gathered about the characters, setting, and major events to compare and contrast the experiences of Emmy and her family. The task of comparing and contrasting is preparation for the Unit 1 Assessment, during which students compare and contrast the experiences of characters in Oliver's Tree.
  • In Lessons 4, 6, 7, and 9, students continue describing pictures of people enjoying trees in their Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1.

In Advance

  • Prepare student workspaces with materials for independent writing in Work Time C: Enjoying Trees journal, pencils, and colored pencils.
  • Post: Learning targets, "The Many Meanings of Words," Tree Stretch chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.1.A.3, K.1.B.6, and K.1.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by revisiting "The Many Meanings of Words" and A Tree for Emmy to continue analyzing word meanings and story elements. Students review how to ask questions when they don't understand part of the story. They are supported through text chunking, rereading, and movement to compare the characters' experiences in the beginning and middle of A Tree for Emmy. 
  • ELLs may find it challenging to produce the language to restate key details comparing Emmy and her family. Before and after each instance in which the students act out what Emmy and her family do, invite students to process orally with partners and then share out with the class.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During the Opening, affix realia to the poem to reinforce the meaning of the words and engage student interest. 
  • Before students begin writing in Work Time C, invite them to practice their responses with a partner or small group. This allows them to articulate their idea before writing, as well as modify or expand it as a result of their conversation.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time C, offer students a longer sentence frame and index cards with key vocabulary to support their responses. Circulate and check in with students one-on-one or in small groups to revisit the prompt and potential answers and/or scribe responses as needed.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Continue to support comprehension by activating prior knowledge and scaffolding connections for students. Continue to provide visual display of questions and student responses on chart paper or the board during discussions.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to support strategy during independent writing by modeling how to physically touch the words/spaces on the sentence frame and draw lines for the words to be written. Recall that this helps students recall their original ideas in the writing process.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Some students may need additional support with sustained effort. Continue to provide targeted feedback that encourages sustained effort during each activity and encourages the use of specific supports and strategies (e.g., the Word Wall and peer support).

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • comparison (L)
  • declare, stubborn, wild (T) 

Review:

  • storybook, enjoy, relax, leaves, roots, noun, verb (L)
  • stick, leaves (T)

Materials

  • "The Many Meanings of Words" (from Lesson 2; one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • A Tree for Emmy (from Lesson 2; one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Close Read-Aloud Guide: A Tree for Emmy (Session 2; for teacher reference)
    • Character Comparison Anchor Chart: A Tree for Emmy (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
    • Character Comparison Anchor Chart: A Tree for Emmy (example; for teacher reference)
    • Asking Questions to Understand a Story anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
    • Trees Are Important Word Wall cards (new; teacher-created; two)
    • Trees Are Important Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1; added to during Work Time B)
  • Reading Literature Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Tree Stretch chart (one to display)
  • Enjoying Trees image 2 (one to display)
  • Language Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources
  • Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1 (from Lesson 2; added to during Work Time C; page 2; one per student)
  • Living Things Word Wall (from Module 3)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Colored pencils (a variety of colors per student)
  • Unit 1 Guiding Question anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1; added to during the Closing; see supporting materials)
  • Unit 1 Guiding Question anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1; example, for teacher reference)
  • Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart (begun in Module 3)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Poem and Movement: "The Many Meanings of Words" (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group. 
  • Display "The Many Meanings of Words" and read aloud the title.
  • Follow the same routine established in Modules 1-3 to read "The Many Meanings of Words":
    • Direct students' attention to the posted poem.
    • Invite students to first listen as you read the poem fluently and without interruption.
    • Reread the poem with students and invite them to read along as you point to the text.
  • Reread Stanza 1 and invite students to act out the two definitions of stick (e.g., hold your arm out like a stick from a tree and pretend to lick and stick a stamp on an envelope).
  • Reread Stanza 2 and invite students to act out the two definitions of leaves (e.g., pretend your hands are leaves falling from a tree and pretend to walk away and leave the group).
  • Provide specific, positive feedback on students' participation with the poem and tell them that they will continue to read "The Many Meanings of Words" in upcoming lessons.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with vocabulary: (Print-rich References) Consider creating a T-chart that displays the words with different meanings side by side. Use index cards with words and illustrations, then remove and have students reaffix accurately. (MMR)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 2: A Tree for Emmy, Pages 1-13 (20 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read the first one aloud:

I can ask and answer questions about the characters, settings, and major events in the text A Tree for Emmy.

  • Remind students that today they will continue to ask and answer questions to understand the story A Tree for Emmy.
  • Remind students that during the read-aloud, they will pause and use the questions from the Asking Questions to Understand a Story anchor chart to help them understand the characters, setting, and major events as they read.
  • Display the text A Tree for Emmy and remind students that this is a storybook, or a book that tells something that happened, either true or made up. Remind students that this story is made up, or fiction. The author imagined these things happening.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for A Tree for Emmy using the Close Read-aloud Guide: A Tree for Emmy (Session 2; for teacher reference). Consider using the Reading Literature Checklist and the Speaking and Listening Checklist during the close read-aloud (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Session 2, refer to the guide for the use of: 
    • Asking Questions to Understand a Story anchor chart 
    • Character Comparison Anchor Chart: A Tree for Emmy 
    • Character Comparison Anchor Chart: A Tree for Emmy (example, for teacher reference) 
    • Trees Are Important Word Wall 
    • Trees Are Important Word Wall card (swing)
    • Refocus whole group. Give students specific, positive feedback on their close reading skills. (Example: "I saw you using the text (illustrations and words) to answer the questions I asked during the close read today.") 
    • Tell students that they will continue reading and tracking the experiences of Emmy and her family in the next lesson.
    • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with motivation: (Working on Same Learning Target) Invite students to discuss how they previously described the characters, settings, and major events using key details from the text. (MME)
    • For ELLs: (Text Engagement: Call and Response) During this read-aloud and in subsequent lessons, make note of each time the text repeats the phrase "Stubborn and strong and a little bit wild." As you read that phrase, leave out the last word and invite students to fill in the rest of the sentence, dramatically signaling that it is their turn to help you complete the phrase by flinging your arm with a flourish. In each instance, strategically pause earlier and earlier to allow students to fill in more of the phrase as you proceed through the text.
    • Reduce barriers to comprehension by activating prior knowledge of the text. Invite students to recall the previous read-aloud session with A Tree for Emmy. (MMR)

    B. Engaging the Learner: Tree Stretch (10 minutes)

    • Refocus whole group.
    • Display the Tree Stretch chart and share that this is a set of movements and stretches that the class can use to pretend to be a tree.
    • Tell students that you will model the steps of the Tree Stretch, and then you will invite them to try it.
    • Model the steps of the Tree Stretch chart:
      • Point to the image next to Step 1 and read the step aloud: "Plant your roots firmly in the ground."
      • Model completing Step 1.
      • Point to the image next to Step 2 and read the step aloud: "Grow your trunk up toward the sun and sky."
      • Model completing Step 2.
      • Point to the image next to Step 3 and read the step aloud: "Grow your branches up toward the sun and sky."
      • Model completing Step 3.
      • Point to the image next to Step 4 and read the step aloud: "Grow your leaves out toward the sun and sky."
      • Model completing Step 4.
      • Point to the image next to Step 5 and read the step aloud: "Sway your leaves and branches in the wind."
      • Model completing Step 5.
    • Invite students to stand up and spread out inside and around the edge of the whole group meeting area. As needed, remind them to move safely and make space for everyone.
    • Invite students to join you as you complete the Tree Stretch.
    • Offer students specific, positive feedback on learning and engaging with a new activity.
    • Tell students that in the next few lessons they will continue practicing the Tree Stretch.
    • For ELLs: (Connecting to Self) Before they begin the Tree Stretch, encourage students to imagine and then share which kind of tree they would like to be as they follow the steps. Remind them that like Gus, they are imagining being a tree.

    C. Independent Writing: Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1 (15 minutes)

    • Refocus whole group.
    • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

    "I can describe the different ways people can enjoy trees."

    • Display Enjoying Trees image 2. 
    • Tell students this is the picture they will describe in their writing today. Consider using the routine from Module 3 to closely observe all parts of the picture.
    • Turn and Talk:

    "How are the people in this picture enjoying trees?" (The family is relaxing in the shade; the family is drinking water; etc.)

    • Circulate and listen as students share, using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track student progress toward SL.K.4 and the Language Checklist to track progress towards L.K.1b, L.K.2a, L.K.2b, and L.K.6. As needed, remind students to use a noun and a verb as they practice their complete sentence.
    • Remind students that they can use words and phrases they learned from the text A Tree for Emmy to help them write.
    • Direct students' attention to the Trees Are Important Word Wall card for relax (to feel calm or restful) on the Trees Are Important Word Wall and tell them that they may want to use this word as they write in their Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1.
    • Tell students that they could also use words for tree parts, like leaves or roots, from the Living Things Word Wall.
    • Point out the following materials already at student workspaces: Enjoying Trees journal, pencils, and colored pencils.
    • Remind students that their writing must contain a noun, the person or people, and a verb that describes what the people are doing.
    • Transition students to their workspaces and invite them to begin working on page 2.
    • Circulate to support students and refer to the Enjoying Trees image 2 and the Trees Are Important Word Wall as needed. Remind students to capitalize the first word of the sentence and use end punctuation.
    • After about 8 minutes, signal students to stop writing and collect their journals.
    • Refocus students whole group.
    • Tell students to put away materials in the designated areas.
    • Offer students specific, positive feedback on their descriptive writing.
    • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with self-monitoring: (Working on Same Learning Target) Invite students to discuss how they previously described the different ways people can enjoy trees. (MMAE)
    • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with strategy development: (Peer Modeling and Leadership: Writing) Invite a few new students who have strong examples of completing the learning target to sit in front of the class and show their writing. Invite other students to appreciate and notice what their classmate did well. (MMAE)
    • For students who may need additional support with organizing ideas for written expression: Invite students to verbally share their sentences before writing. (MMAE)

    Closing & Assessments

    ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

    A. Pinky Partners Protocol: Ways to Enjoy Trees (10 minutes)

    • Invite students back to the whole group area.
    • Direct students' attention to the Unit 1 Guiding Question anchor chart.
    • Tell students they are going to use the Pinky Partners protocol to discuss their ideas about different ways trees are important. Remind them that they used this protocol in Module 3 and review as necessary using the Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
    • Guide students through the protocol to discuss ways trees are important, keeping in mind the text A Tree for Emmy and the writing from the Enjoying Trees Journal, Part 1.
    • As students talk, circulate and listen in to identify a few students to share out with the whole group.
    • Refocus whole group.
    • Invite students to share out and as they do, capture their responses on the Unit 1 Guiding Question anchor chart. Refer to the Unit 1 Guiding Question anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
    • Refocus whole group and, with excitement, tell students that they will continue reading, writing, and discussing ways to enjoy trees over the next several days!
    • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with engagement: (Partner Share Out) Invite students to share what their partners said. (MME)
    • For students who may need additional support with sustained effort: Invite students to share how their partner discussions support working toward the learning target. (MME)

    Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

    Sign Up