Reading, Writing, and Speaking: Close Read-aloud, Session 3 and Writing Neatly in Weather Journals | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA GK:M2:U2:L8

Reading, Writing, and Speaking: Close Read-aloud, Session 3 and Writing Neatly in Weather Journals

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.2: With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
  • RL.K.4: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).
  • W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.6: Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can describe how the hot, dry weather affects Tess and Mamma in the text Come On, Rain! (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.4, RL.K.7)
  • I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather. (W.K.2, SL.K.5)
  • I can share a report of the weather with others. (SL.K.4, L.K.6, SL.K.1a)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Close Read-aloud, Session 3, listen for students to describe how the hot, dry weather affects Tess and her mamma. (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.4, RL.K.7)
  • During Work Time B, circulate and observe students as they complete page 3 of their weather journal independently. Watch for them to color carefully in Step 1 and write neatly in Step 2 while continuing to observe and accurately record the weather conditions. (W.K.2, SL.K.4)
  • During Closing A, circulate and observe students as they share page 3 of their weather journal. Watch for them to use a clear voice, look at their partner, and point to the weather icons when sharing. As needed, refer students to the Ways We Share Our Work and Things Meteorologists Do anchor charts. (SL.K.1a, SL.K.4, SL.K.6)
  • During Closing B, listen for students to share tangible ways they showed perseverance during Work Time. (SL.K.1, SL.K.1a)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Interactive Word Wall: Building Vocabulary (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 3: Come on, Rain!, Pages 7–14 (20 minutes)

B. Independent Writing: High-Quality Work in Weather Journals (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pair-Share: Weather Journals (5 minutes)

B. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Reflecting on Perseverance (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • Students continue learning about daily weather and its effects on peoples’ everyday lives. Through Session 3 of the close read-aloud, students consider how the coming rain affects Tess and Mamma’s daily life. Through the weather journal routine, they continue to hone in on specific criteria of high-quality work to produce high-quality work in their own weather journals.
  • In the Opening, students revisit the Interactive Word Wall protocol from Unit 1, Lessons 9–11. In this protocol, the Interactive Word Wall cards are a mix of Weather Word Wall words and words from the text Come On, Rain! This mixture supports students to make connections between the narrative text and the content topic of weather. (RL.K.4, SL.K.1, L.K.6)
  • Close read-alouds are distinct from, and do not replace, more typical daily read-alouds. Daily read-alouds are essential so that students experience the volume of reading needed to build their world knowledge and vocabulary. For suggestions of texts (related to the module topic) to use in more typical read-alouds, see the Recommended Texts and Other Resources list. These texts can be purchased; many of them can also be found in local libraries. To enhance this list, consider bringing in other texts you know of that relate to the module topic.
  • In the Closing, students revisit a habit of character: perseverance. Through reflection with a partner, they begin to consider specific ways to show perseverance in their work: by taking on a challenge, continuing with a difficult task, or asking for help when needed. This reflection helps to bring this habit of character into the classroom space in a more active, concrete way.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 7, students were introduced to the first criterion on the High-Quality Work anchor chart: coloring carefully. Today students learn about the second criterion: writing neatly. As students complete page 3 of their weather journal, they are challenged to implement both criteria to create high-quality work.
  • Continue to use Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may find it challenging to self-reflect on their ability to show perseverance in their work. If needed, provide additional examples of what it looks like to show perseverance when attempting a difficult task (e.g., tying shoes, riding a bike, building a tower of blocks). As time permits, consider allowing students to act out scenes of showing perseverance to support understanding of this habit of character.

Down the road:

  • As students continue the daily routine of completing a weather journal page, they will be introduced to a lengthier template that includes four steps. They also will learn about a third criterion for high-quality work and gradually implement all three criteria listed on the High-Quality Work anchor chart.

In Advance

  • Predetermine small groups (four or five students) for working together during the Interactive Word Wall protocol. Consider creating groups with a variety of language strengths and needs.
  • Prepare:
    • Interactive Word Wall card sets and arrow card sets (see supporting materials).
    • Weather Journal: Page 3 Model and Weather Journal: Page 3 Non-Model. If possible, make copies in color.
  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide for Come On, Rain! (Session 3; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Since many kindergarteners do not yet decode words independently, visuals are a helpful addition to anchor charts. Consider disassembling and cutting images from an extra copy of Come On, Rain! to use on the Before the Rain and After the Rain anchor charts. See Come On, Rain! pictures in the Lesson 7 supporting materials for recommended images.
  • Distribute materials for Work Time B at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Review the Interactive Word Wall protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, Unit 2 Guiding Question anchor chart, Weather Journal: Page 3 Model and Non-Model, Conversation Partners chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • If students were recorded participating in the Interactive Word Wall and Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocols in Unit 1, consider playing the recordings to remind students of the process.
  • Create the After the Rain anchor chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.
  • Students complete their weather journals using word-processing software, such as Google Docs.
  • Students use speech-to-text facilities activated on devices or use an app or software like Dragon Dictation.
  • If students were recorded sharing their weather journal in Lesson 6, consider playing these recordings to remind them of the process.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.B.6, K.I.C.10, and K.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to read and interpret the text Come On, Rain! Students will use key words and phrases from the text to retell events and discuss different ways the weather affects the main characters.
  • In Work Time A, ELLs are invited to participate in a Language Dive conversation (optional). This conversation guides them through expanding the meaning of a sentence from the text Come On, Rain! It also provides students with further practice using the language structure from the text. Students may draw on this sentence when discussing how the weather affects the characters in the text. Preview the Language Dive Guide and consider how to invite conversation among students to address the questions and goals suggested under each sentence strip chunk (see supporting materials). Select from the questions and goals provided to best meet your students' needs.
  • Create a “Language Chunk Wall”—an area in the classroom where students can display and categorize the academic phrases discussed in the Language Dive. During the Language Dive, students are invited to place the Language Dive sentence strip chunks on the Language Chunk Wall into corresponding categories, such as “Nouns and noun phrases” or “Language to talk about purpose.” Students can then refer to the wall after the Language Dive and during subsequent lessons. For this lesson, the categories are “Nouns and noun phrases,” “Adjectives and language to describe,” and “Language to talk about location or direction.”

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • During the Language Dive, challenge students to generate questions about the sentence before asking the prepared questions. Example: “What questions can we ask about this sentence? Let’s see if we can answer them together.”
  • Challenge students to use structures and vocabulary from the Language Dive as they write and discuss their weather journals. (Example: “It feels nearly _____.” “It is sizzling.”)
  • Encourage students to use Conversation Cues with classmates to extend and deepen conversations, think with others, and enhance language development.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, for students who have trouble writing, scribe the words for them with a highlighter. Invite students to trace the highlighter with pencil or pen.
  • During the close read, support students by encouraging them to act out parts of the text. Dictate lines for them to recite so that they practice using verbal language. (Example: “Pretend you are Tess. What is she feeling and saying as she is waiting for the rain?”)

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the Closing, students discuss how they showed perseverance during the lesson. It may be tricky for students to remember that there are several ways to show perseverance (challenging themselves, continuing to try, asking for help). To support students’ comprehension of the different ways to show perseverance, customize the anchor chart by including printed photos of children in kindergarten persevering in different ways.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): When reviewing the Interactive Word Wall protocol, consider whether students need additional time to review. Model how to connect the Interactive Word Wall cards, provide options for physical action, and reinforce the meaning of connect by inviting students to hook their index fingers together and make a “click” sound.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During Work Time B, students learn about how writing neatly is a criterion of high-quality work. While holding high expectations is important, be aware that sometimes these expectations can raise student anxiety. Emphasize the importance of process and effort by discussing how even when you try your best to write neatly, you can sometimes make a mistake and that is okay.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • neatly (L)
  • Tess, Mamma, sizzling, sweat, splash, fresh, trickles, hopeful, sways (T)

Review:

  • rain, sun, hot, quality, carefully, report (L)

Materials

  • Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 9)
  • Interactive Word Wall cards (one set per group)
  • Arrow cards (one set per group)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Module 1; one to display)
  • Unit 2 Guiding Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Come On, Rain! (from Lesson 6; Session 3; for teacher reference)
    • Come On, Rain! (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Reading Literature Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 2)
    • Before the Rain anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
    • After the Rain anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
    • Come On, Rain! (extra copy; one to cut and use for puppets and anchor chart visuals)
    • Come On, Rain! pictures (from Lesson 7; for teacher reference)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
  • Weather Journal: Page 3 Model (one to display)
  • Weather Journal: Page 3 Non-Model (one to display)
  • Weather journals (from Lesson 6; page 3; one for teacher modeling and one per student)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Crayons (class set; variety of colors per student)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Module 1)
  • Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Perseverance anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Language Dive Guide I: Come On Rain! (optional; for ELLs; for teacher reference; see supporting materials)
  • Sentence strip chunks I: Come On, Rain! (one to display, see supporting materials)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Interactive Word Wall: Building Vocabulary (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group gathering area.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Interactive Word Wall protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in Unit 1 and review as necessary using the Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Hold up each Interactive Word Wall card, reading the word aloud. Make sure all students can see the word and picture on each card.
  • Share that today students will work in small groups to complete the activity.
  • Move students into predetermined groups and distribute the Interactive Word Wall cards and arrow cards.
  • Guide students through the Interactive Word Wall protocol. As groups work to connect all of their word cards, circulate and provide reminders about how to participate correctly.
  • Gather students whole group and give them specific, positive feedback regarding their participation in the protocol. (Example: “I noticed that Jordan waited his turn and connected the words rain and Tess.”)
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What step in this protocol did you do well?” (I sat in the circle; I waited my turn; I connected two cards; I explained my connection.)

“What are two words you connected in your group?” (Responses will vary, but should include two Interactive Word Wall card words.)

  • Invite several students to share out.
  • When reviewing the Interactive Word Wall protocol and modeling how to connect a few Interactive Word Wall cards, provide options for physical action and reinforce the meaning of connect by inviting students to hook their index fingers together and make a “click” sound. (MMAE, MMR)
  • For ELLs: Check for comprehension by inviting students to paraphrase the rationale for each connection in their own words. Restate or rephrase as necessary. (Example: “Tess is waiting for the rain. Jordan, can you tell me in your own words why we connected Tess and rain?”)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 3: Come on, Rain! Pages 7–14 (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning target and read the first one aloud:

“I can describe how the hot, dry weather affects Tess and Mamma in the text Come On, Rain!”

  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Come On, Rain! using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Come On, Rain! (Session 3; for teacher reference). Consider using the Reading Literature Checklist during the close read-aloud (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Refer to the guide for the use of the Before the Rain anchor chart and After the Rain anchor chart.
  • Invite students to stand quietly in their spaces, making space for everyone.
  • Lead students through one round of the Making a Rain Shower activity from the Opening of Lesson 6.
  • Refocus students whole group.
  • After reading and introducing new terms and phrases, optimize relevance by inviting students to apply the term/phrase as they share real-life examples. (Example: “Think of a time when you have been ‘slick with sweat.’ Raise your hand if you want to share a time you felt this way.”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: During or after Work Time A, lead students through a Language Dive (see supporting materials). Refer to the Language Dive Guide (for teacher reference). Display the sentence strip chunks.

B. Independent Writing: High-Quality Work in Weather Journals (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bow and take aim at the target.
  • Direct students’ attention to the High-Quality Work anchor chart and review the definition of quality (degree of value or excellence).
  • Remind students that in the last lesson, they focused on coloring carefully. Review the definition of carefully (to take care).
  • Read the second criterion aloud:
    • “Write neatly.”
  • Define neatly (in a neat way).
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you think it means to write neatly?” (form or make letters correctly; write so others can read your writing; write on/inside the lines on the paper)

“Why do you think it is important to write neatly?” (It is important because writing neatly makes your work look good and people can read it.)

  • Display Weather Journal: Page 3 Model and Weather Journal: Page 3 Non-Model side by side.
  • Invite students to compare the model and the non-model.
  • Pointing to the non-model, ask:

“What do you notice about this weather journal?” (The writing is messy; it doesn’t look neat or good; you can’t read the writing.)

  • Pointing to the model, ask:

“What do you notice about this weather journal?” (The writing is neat and easy to read.)

  • Share that today students will complete Steps 1–2 of the weather journal page 3. Today the challenge is to write neatly in Step 2.
  • Direct students’ attention to the displayed page 3 of the weather journal.
  • Model completing Step 2:
  1. Read the sentence aloud: “It is _____ outside.”
  2. Think aloud about a word that describes the weather. (Example: “I look outside and I see rain falling. I also hear thunder. It is wet outside.”)
  3. Write the word, saying the sounds aloud as you record them. (Example: “w-e-t”)
  4. Read the completed sentence aloud. (Example: “It is wet outside.”)
  • Share that for many kindergarten students, writing neatly is a big challenge. Encourage students to persevere in this work today even if it is difficult.
  • Point out the pencils, crayons, and weather journals at students’ workspaces. Invite them to turn to page 3 and begin working on Steps 1–2.
  • Give students 5–7 minutes to complete page 3 of their weather journal. As they work, circulate and engage with them about their work. Reread the sentence frame in Step 2 and refer students to the Weather Word Wall as needed. Consider prompting students by asking:

“Do you think this writing is quality work?”

“Why did you choose this picture/word to describe today’s weather?”

“Could you read your sentence aloud to me?”

  • Signal students to stop working through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle. Model cleanup, keeping directions clear and brief. Invite students to walk safely to the whole group gathering area, bringing their weather journals with them for the Closing.
  • When modeling completing the weather journal, emphasize the importance of process and effort by discussing how even when you try your best to write neatly, you can sometimes make a mistake and that is okay. (Example: “High-quality work means that I’ve tried my best to write neatly. But sometimes, even when I’m being very careful, mistakes happen. I might be so focused on keeping my letters on/inside the lines that I accidentally write the letter facing the wrong direction. That is okay, and my work is still good because I tried my best to write neatly.”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: After reviewing the definition of high-quality work, ask students to put the learning target in their own words now that they know what it means to do high-quality work. (Example: I can write neatly to tell about the weather today.”)
  • For ELLs: While discussing Part 2 of the weather journal entry, explicitly discuss the differences between the meanings of the words. (Example: “What is the difference between cold and chilly? Who can act like they are cold? Who can act like they are chilly? If it is snowing, do you think it is just chilly, or is it cold?”)
  • For ELLs: After modeling the activity, consider completing it once more as an interactive writing experience to bolster confidence before independent work.
  • For ELLs: Some students may have trouble reading their work aloud. Help them identify key elements of their journal and allow them to repeat words and phrases. (Example: “It looks like you wrote ‘It is warm outside.’ Watch me point to the words. It. is. warm. outside. Now you try.”)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Pair-Share: Weather Journals (5 minutes)

  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to pair up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the third one aloud:

“I can share a report of the weather with others.”

  • Review the definition of report (a statement or story about something that has happened).
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bow and take aim at the target.
  • Briefly review the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart if needed.
  • Remind students that when they share, they will share the weather like a meteorologist (e.g., use weather words, point at the weather picture).
  • Invite a student to come to the front of the whole group and model sharing Steps 1–2 with the class. Give the student specific, positive feedback. (Example: “Leonor, you pointed to the weather picture while you told me what today’s weather is like.”)
  • Tell students they will now share with their partner.
    • Invite partner A to begin sharing. Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after partner A has shared.
    • As students share, circulate and offer guidance and support as necessary. Re-model reading Steps 1–2 aloud if necessary.
    • Refocus students whole group.
    • Repeat the sharing process with partner B.
  • Refocus students whole group.
  • For ELLs: Invite students to use the sentence frame from the Language Dive to discuss the weather they observed in their journals: “I feel nearly _____ in the _____.”

B. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Reflecting on Perseverance (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Perseverance anchor chart and review the definition briefly, reminding them of the three main ways they can show perseverance. Consider referring to the Weather Word Wall for support.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to reflect on how they have shown perseverance during various parts of the unit so far, and to tell Sofia how they are helping her be more prepared for all types of weather. Remind them that they used this protocol in Unit 1 and review as necessary using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol using the following question:

“How did you persevere in your work today?” (Responses will vary, but may include: I challenged myself to write a tricky word. I kept trying to color carefully even when it was hard for me. I asked for help to find a word on the Weather Word Wall.)

  • If productive, cue students to listen carefully:

“Who can repeat what your classmate said?” (Responses will vary.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and target a few students to share out whole group.
  • Refocus students whole group and select volunteers to share out.
  • As students share tangible classroom examples, consider adding these examples to the Perseverance anchor chart.
  • As students discuss ways they showed perseverance, customize the chart by displaying photos of children in kindergarten persevering as they learn about weather. (MMR)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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