You are here

ELA GK:M2:U2:L9

Reading, Writing, and Speaking: Close Read-aloud, Session 4 and High-Quality Work in Weather Journals

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.2: With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
  • RL.K.4: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).
  • W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.             
  • SL.K.6: Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can describe how the cool, wet weather affects Tess and Mamma in the text Come On, Rain! (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.4, RL.K.7)
  • I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather. (W.K.2, SL.K.5).
  • I can share a report of the weather with others. (SL.K.4, L.K.6, SL.K.1a)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Close Read-aloud, Session 4, listen for students to describe how the cool, wet weather affects Tess and her mamma. (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.4, RL.K.7) Use the Reading Literature Checklist to assess students’ progress toward these standards (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time B, circulate and observe students as they complete page 4 of their weather journal independently. Watch for them to write neatly in Step 2 while continuing to observe and accurately record the weather conditions. (W.K.2, SL.K.4)
  • During Closing A, circulate and observe students as they share page 4 of their weather journal. Watch for them to share with greater confidence and independence. Also listen for students to ask and answer a question about their weather journal. (SL.K.1a, SL.K.4, SL.K.6)
  • During Closing B, listen for students to share how they persevered to create high-quality work. (SL.K.1, SL.K.1a)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Interactive Word Wall: Building Vocabulary (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud Session 4: Come on, Rain!, Pages 15–26 (20 min)

B. Independent Writing: High-Quality Work in Weather Journals (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pair-Share: Weather Journals (10 minutes)

B. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson follows the same pattern as Lessons 6–8. Today students work to complete a page in their weather journal with greater independence, while also attending to two criteria for high-quality work: coloring carefully and writing neatly. Students also share their weather journal page in the same manner that a meteorologist shares a weather report.
  • During Work Time B, students continue the routine of completing a weather journal page, honing their drawing and writing abilities and focusing on the criteria listed on the High-Quality Work anchor chart. Students also practice observation and recording skills as they notice and record the daily weather conditions, supporting them to think and act like a meteorologist. (W.K.2)
  • During Closing B, students revisit perseverance and consider how they persevered through their work on page 4 of their weather journal. Students are given sentence starters to support their reflection: “I challenged myself to ________,” “I kept trying to ________,” and “I asked for help with _______.” These supports help students to connect the concept of perseverance to their own work.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 8, students participated in the Interactive Word Wall protocol. In the Opening, students again engage in connecting words from the text Come On, Rain! with weather-related content words.
  • In Lessons 7–8, students were introduced to two criteria from the High-Quality Work anchor chart: coloring carefully and writing neatly. In Work Time B, students review these criteria and consider how they can challenge themselves to create high-quality work on page 4 of their weather journal.
  • Continue to use Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • During Work Time B, students are invited to self-reflect on a criterion for high-quality work that is challenging for them before they begin working on page 4 of their weather journal. This type of self-reflection requires the metacognitive ability to think about one’s work process and may challenge students. If students are not able to consider and select an area of challenge independently, present a simple question: “Which is more difficult for you, coloring carefully or writing neatly?”

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 10, students will complete the Culminating Task: Before and After the Rain during Session 5 of the Close Read-aloud. In this task, students will consider how Mamma has changed from the beginning to the end of the text.

In Advance

  • Predetermine small groups (four or five students) for working together during the Interactive Word Wall protocol. Consider creating groups with a variety of language strengths and needs.
  • Prepare:
    • Interactive Word Wall card sets and arrow card sets (see supporting materials).
    • Weather Journal: Page 4 Model and Weather Journal: Page 4 Non-Model. If possible, make copies in color.
  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide for Come On, Rain! (Session 4; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Distribute materials for Work Time B at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Review the Interactive Word Wall protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, Weather Journal: Page 4 Model and Non-Model, Conversation Partners chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list)

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • If students were recorded participating in the Interactive Word Wall and Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocols in Unit 1, consider playing these recordings to remind them of the process.
  • Students complete their weather journals using word-processing software, such as Google Docs.
  • Students use speech-to-text facilities activated on devices or use an app or software like Dragon Dictation.
  • If students were recorded sharing their weather journal in Lesson 6, consider playing these recordings to remind them of the process.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.B.6, K.I.C.10, and K.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to read and interpret the text Come On, Rain! Students will use key words and phrases from the text to retell and discuss different ways the weather affects the main characters.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to comprehend some of the academic syntax and vocabulary found in the text. Consider reviewing or completing the Language Dive conversation from Lesson 8 to support their comprehension and English language development.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • Encourage students to use Conversation Cues with classmates to extend and deepen conversations, think with others, and enhance language development.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, for students who have trouble writing, scribe the words for them with a highlighter. Invite students to trace the highlighter with pencil or pen.
  • During the close read, support students by encouraging them to act out parts of the text. Dictate lines for them to recite so that they practice using verbal language. (Example: “Pretend you are Tess. What is she feeling and saying as she is waiting for the rain?”)

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the close read-aloud, definitions of new vocabulary may be difficult to visualize. Invite students to act out the definitions. For example, as you define the word descend on page 17, invite students to show the meaning (to move downward or to a lower position) with their bodies.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During the close read-aloud, some students may benefit from sensory input and opportunities for movement while they are sitting. Provide options for differentiated seating, such as sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During Work Time B, students revisit the criteria for high-quality work. While holding high expectations is important, be aware that sometimes these expectations can raise student anxiety. Emphasize the importance of process and effort by asking students to generate strategies for what to do if they make a mistake.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T);  Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • descends, fling, shimmies (T)

Review:

  • affect, challenge (L)

Materials

  • Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 9)
  • Interactive Word Wall cards (from Lesson 8; one set per group)
  • Arrow cards (from Lesson 8; one set per group)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Module 1; one to display)
  • Unit 2 Guiding Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Come On, Rain! (from Lesson 6; Session 4; for teacher reference)
    • Come On, Rain! (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Reading Literature Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 2)
    • Before the Rain anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
    • After the Rain anchor chart (begun in Lesson 8)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
  • Weather Journal: Page 4 Model (one to display)
  • Weather Journal: Page 4 Non-Model (one to display)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Crayons (class set; variety of colors per student)
  • Weather journals (from Lesson 6; page 4; one per student)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Module 1)
  • Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Perseverance anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart (begun in Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Interactive Word Wall: Building Vocabulary (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group area.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Interactive Word Wall protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in the last lesson and review as necessary using the Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Hold up each Interactive Word Wall card, reading the word aloud. Make sure all students can see the word and picture on each card.
  • Share that today students will work in small groups to complete the activity.
  • Remind students that some of the words are from the Weather Word Wall, and some are from the text Come On, Rain!
  • Move students into predetermined groups and distribute the Interactive Word Wall cards and arrow cards.
  • Guide students through the Interactive Word Wall protocol. As groups work to connect all of their word cards, circulate and provide reminders about how to participate correctly.
  • Gather students whole group and give them specific, positive feedback regarding their participation in the protocol. (Example: “I noticed that Mary Anna connected the words hot and Mamma, and she explained that these words belong together because Mamma feels very hot before the rain comes.”)
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What two words did you connect, and why?” (Responses will vary, but should include naming the two words and explaining their connection.)

  • Invite several students to share out.
  • When reviewing the Interactive Word Wall protocol and modeling connecting a few Interactive Word Wall cards, provide options for physical action and reinforce the meaning of connect by inviting students to hook their index fingers together and make a “click” sound. (MMAE, MMR)
  • For ELLs: Check for comprehension by inviting students to paraphrase the rationale for each connection in their own words. Restate or rephrase as necessary. (Example: “Tess is waiting for the rain. Jordan, can you tell me in your own words why we connected Tess and rain?”)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 4: Come on, Rain!, Pages 15–26 (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can describe how the cool, wet weather affects Tess and Mamma in the text Come On, Rain!”

  • Ask:

“What is new in this learning target?” (cool, wet weather)

  • Draw a simple picture of an umbrella or raindrops above the words “cool, wet.”
  • Emphasize to students that today their focus will be on how the change in the weather affects Tess and her mamma. Briefly review the definition of affect (to cause a change in).
  • Invite students to hold out their hands to feel for imaginary raindrops falling from the sky, and then to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Come On, Rain! using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Come On, Rain! (Session 4; for teacher reference). Consider using the Reading Literature Checklist during the close read-aloud (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Refer to the guide for the use of the Before the Rain anchor chart and After the Rain anchor chart.
  • Invite students to stand quietly in their spaces, making space for everyone.
  • Lead students through one round of the Making a Rain Shower activity from the Opening of Lesson 6.
  • Refocus students whole group.
  • When preparing students for the close read-aloud, provide options for physical action and sensory input by differentiating seating. Some students might benefit from sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs. (MMAE)
  • When defining the word descend on page 17, provide options for physical action and clarify vocabulary by inviting students to show the meaning (to move downward or to a lower position) with their bodies. (MMR, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: During or after Work Time A, consider completing or returning to the Language Dive conversation introduced in Lesson 8. Use structures from the Language Dive to discuss how the weather affects the characters in the text. (Example: “[Character] feels _____ in the _____.”)

B. Independent Writing: High-Quality Work in Weather Journals (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bow and take aim at the target.
  • Direct students’ attention to the High-Quality Work anchor chart and review the first two bullets.
  • Remind students that in the last lesson, they focused on writing neatly.
  • Share that today students will work to color carefully and write neatly while completing Steps 1–2 in their weather journals.
  • Display Weather Journal: Page 4 Model and Weather Journal: Page 4 Non-Model.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“How do these two weather journal pages look different?” (One has careful coloring and writing, but the other has messy coloring and writing.)

  • Refocus students whole group and invite a few students to share out. As students share, highlight any contrast noticed between neat and messy coloring and writing.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“Which weather journal page shows high-quality work? Why?” (The model is high-quality work because the coloring is inside the lines and the words are easy to read.)

  • Refocus students whole group and invite a few students to share their responses. Again, help students make the connection that the example page 4 of the weather journal clearly shows the two elements of high-quality work: color carefully and write neatly.
  • Share that today students will complete Steps 1–2 again. Today the challenge is to color carefully in Step 1 and write neatly in Step 2.
  • Review the definition of challenge (an interesting or difficult problem).
  • Prompt students to consider which aspect of quality work is the biggest challenge for them: coloring neatly or writing neatly.
  • With excitement, invite students to touch their forehead if they are now ready to persevere in their biggest challenge: to create a high-quality weather journal they will be proud to share with others!
  • Invite students to take the pencils, crayons, and weather journals at their table area, turn to page 4, and begin working on Steps 1–2.
  • Give students 5–7 minutes to complete page 4 of their weather journals. As they work, circulate and engage with them about their work. Reread the sentence frame in Step 2 and refer students to the Weather Word Wall as needed. Consider prompting students by asking:

“Which part is more challenging for you, coloring or writing? Why?”

“Why did you choose this picture/word to describe today’s weather?”

“Could you read your sentence aloud to me?”

  • Signal students to stop working through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle. Model cleanup, keeping directions clear and brief. Invite students to walk safely to the whole group gathering area, bringing their weather journals with them for the Closing.
  • When modeling completing the weather journal, emphasize the importance of process and effort by asking students to generate strategies for what to do if they make a mistake. (Example: “High-quality work means that I’ve tried my best to color carefully and write neatly. If I make a mistake, I do not need to feel upset. Who can remind me of some strategies I can use if I make a mistake?” -take a deep breath, be flexible, remember that high quality means trying your best) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Before beginning independent work, review the differences between the meanings of the words in Part 2 of the weather journal. (Example: “What is the difference between cold and chilly? Who can act like they are cold? Who can act like they are chilly? If it is snowing, do you think it is just chilly, or is it cold?”)
  • For ELLs: Some students may have trouble reading their work aloud. Help them identify key elements of their journal and allow them to repeat words and phrases. (Example: “It looks like you wrote, ‘It is warm outside.’ Watch me point to the words. It. is. warm. outside. Now you try.”)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Pair-Share: Weather Journals (10 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the third one aloud:

“I can share a report of the weather with others.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to pair up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart and Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart to remind students about sharing a weather report as needed.
  • Share that today, when students share their weather report, they will have a chance to ask their partner a question about today’s weather.
  • Model this process with a student:

1. Invite the student to read page 4 of his/her weather journal aloud.

2. Ask a question about the weather based on the student’s weather report. (Example: “It is cold today, so what should I wear when I go outside for recess?”)

3. Give the student the opportunity to answer the question. (Example: “You should wear your coat, scarf, and hat.”)

  • Model the process again, switching roles:

4. Read aloud page 4 of the example weather journal.

5. Invite the student to ask a question about the weather based on the weather report. (Example: “Is it warm and sunny or cold and sunny?”)

6. Answer the question. (Example: “It is cold and sunny.”)

  • Tell students they will now share with their partner.
    • Invite partner A to begin sharing. Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after partner A has shared.
    • As students share, circulate and offer guidance and support as necessary. Re-model reading Steps 1–2 aloud if necessary.
    • Refocus students whole group.
  • For ELLs: While modeling the Pair-Share process, invite students to generate some possible questions they could ask their partners as they share. Display the questions and invite students to use these ideas when they are sharing with their partners. (Examples: “How do you know it is cold?” “What do you think the weather might be tomorrow?”)

B. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Perseverance anchor chart and review the definition briefly, reminding students of the three main ways they can show perseverance. Also consider referring to the Weather Word Wall for support.
  • Prompt students to consider how they persevered while creating high-quality work today. Remind students that they thought about one challenge to work on while coloring and writing in their weather journals.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to reflect on how they have shown perseverance during various parts of the unit so far, and to tell Sofia how they are helping her be more prepared for all types of weather. Remind them that they used this protocol in the previous lesson and review as necessary using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.).
  • Guide students through the protocol using the following question:

“How did you persevere to create high-quality work today?”

  • Provide several sentence starters to choose among:
    • “I challenged myself to ________.”
    • “I kept trying to ________.”
    • “I asked for help with _______.”
  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and target a few students to share out with the whole group.
  • Refocus students whole group and select volunteers to share out.
  • As students share tangible classroom examples, consider adding these examples to the Perseverance anchor chart.
  • If productive, cue students to think about their thinking:

“How does our discussion add to your understanding of perseverance? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • Share that in the next lesson, students will persevere to complete a high-quality weather journal page that can be shared with a small group of students.
  • As students discuss ways they showed perseverance, customize the display by including a printed photo or photos of children in kindergarten persevering as they learn about weather. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Briefly review the learning target from Work Time B. Ask students to rephrase the target with an example of how they persevered. (Example: I can carefully write and draw about the weather. I can try again if it is hard.)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up