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ELA GK:M2:U2:L12

Reading Aloud and Writing: Brave Irene, Part II and Weather Journals

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.3: With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
  • W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.2: Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.5: Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can identify the major events in the text Brave Irene. (RL K.1, R.LK.3, SL.K.2)
  • I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather. (W.K.2, SL.K.5, L.K.6)
  • I can share a report of the weather with others. (SL.K.1a, SL.K.4, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Times A and B, listen in as students Think-Pair-Share in response to questions about Brave Irene. Track students’ progress on the Reading Literature Checklist for this module (see Assessment Overview and Resources). (RL.K.1, RL.K.3)
  • During Closing A, circulate and observe students as they complete page 7 of the weather journal independently. Watch for them to observe and accurately name and describe the day’s weather conditions, as well as generate an illustration while completing Step 4. (W.K.2, SL.K.4)
  • During Closing B, circulate and observe students as they share their weather journal. Watch for them to use a strong, clear voice, look at their partner, and point to the weather icons when sharing. As needed, refer students to the Ways We Share Our Work and Things Meteorologists Do anchor charts to provide support and redirection. (SL.K.1a, SL.K.4, SL.K.6)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Developing Language: “Snowflakes” Poem (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading Aloud: Brave Irene, Pages 14–28 (15 minutes)

B. Role-Playing: Brave Irene (10 minutes)

C. Shared Writing: Brave Irene Story Elements (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Independent Writing: Weather Journals (15 minutes)

B. Small Group Share: Weather Journals (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Work Time A, students continue to read Brave Irene to learn about how the weather affects people—in this case, Irene, the main character in the text. During this focused read-aloud, students answer text-dependent questions after hearing the text read aloud. These questions are found directly in the body of the lesson; they have a skill-based focus for reading and are fewer in number than in a close read-aloud. (RL.K.1, RL.K.3)
  • Students continue to build independence and stamina as writers as they complete all the sections of the weather journal. (W.K.2, L.K.6, SL.K.5)
  • Recall that the pages of Brave Irene are not numbered. For instructional purposes, the page that begins with “Mrs. Bobbin, the dressmaker, was tired and had a bad headache” should be considered page 1 and all pages thereafter numbered accordingly.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Work Time in this lesson follows the same sequence as Lesson 11. Students continue to listen to Brave Irene read aloud, role-play significant parts, and identify certain elements of the story. Students will be asked to identify major events in the story and track these on the Brave Irene anchor chart, as in Lesson 11.
  • Students continue to work on their weather journals, this time adding in Step 4, in which they draw a picture that shows what type of activity they might like to do in this type of weather.
  • As in Lessons 7–11, students continue to share their weather journal pages with others as they make progress toward SL.K.4 and SL.K.6.
  • Continue to use Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • When analyzing narratives, some students may struggle with determining the difference between any event and “major” events. Guide them toward major events by showing the pictures, reading the excerpts associated with these events, and thinking aloud as necessary. Students will continue to have practice with this in Lesson 14.
  • Some students may need additional support generating a picture for Step 4 of the weather journal. Engage in dialogue with these students by asking: “What would you like to do in weather like today?” and then help them think about a simple illustration that corresponds with that activity.

Down the road:

  • In Unit 3, students will write their own narrative stories about how the weather affected a character, so the reading of Brave Irene is scaffolding toward building an understanding of story structure and story elements. Students will apply their understanding of story elements as they plan, write, and revise their own stories.
  • Throughout Lessons 12–14, students work daily to complete a weather journal page independently. Across the arc of these lessons, the weather journal page includes more steps to complete. Students also focus on honing the quality of their work through a series of mini lessons focused on various criteria of high-quality work. Students will continue to identify and meet criteria of quality as they write their own narratives in Unit 3.
  • At the end of Unit 3, students will share their weather journals during a Weather Expo, the culmination of the entire module.

In Advance

  • Since many kindergarteners do not yet decode words independently, visuals are a helpful addition to anchor charts. Consider disassembling and cutting images from an extra copy of Brave Irene to use on the Brave Irene anchor chart. See recommended images on the Brave Irene anchor chart document in the supporting materials.
  • Distribute materials for Closing A at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • If you recorded students reading the “Snowflakes” poem in Lesson 11, play the recording for them to join in with.
  • If students were recorded participating in the Think-Pair-Share protocol in Unit 1 or role-playing or sharing their weather journals in previous lessons, consider playing these recordings to remind students of the process.
  • Students complete their weather journals using word-processing software, such as Google Docs.
  • Students use speech-to-text facilities activated on devices or use an app or software like Dragon Dictation.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.B.6, K.I.C.10, and K.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing opportunities to deepen comprehension and practice oral language by acting out key events from the text Brave Irene. This will help prepare them for sequencing events in Work Time C and for the unit assessment.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to recall, identify, and sequence major events in a story. In preparation for the Unit 2 Assessment, consider spending additional time practicing this skill. See levels of support below and the Meeting Students’ Needs column for details.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time B, challenge students to use language from the unit’s Language Dives and vocabulary from the text as they act out events from Brave Irene. (Example: “I am nearly freezing in the cold! The snow is whirling all around me!”)

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, empower students to ask their partners for help if they are not sure what to say. Encourage them to say, “line,” if they feel stuck. Their partners can then suggest something for them to say.
  • During Work Time C, practice sequencing events by creating cards with illustrations of major events in familiar stories, such as Come On, Rain! or Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon. Invite students, with partners or as a whole class, to sequence each event. Prompt students to describe the sequence using the words first, next, and last.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the read-aloud in Work Time A, students are introduced to the word buried. In addition to defining the vocabulary word, it can be helpful to apply the term to other contexts based on students’ experiences and prior knowledge.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): This lesson includes independent writing. Kindergarteners have a wide variety of writing skills and needs. To help students express their ideas in the weather journal, offer options for drawing utensils, writing tools, and scaffolds.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During the Closing, students have an opportunity to share their weather journals with their peers. This is a good opportunity to foster community and support students to provide each other with positive feedback. Before students share the weather journal pages, discuss strategies for how to give a compliment to a peer about her or his work.

Vocabulary

Key:  Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • buried, sled (T)

Review:

  • major, event (L)

Materials

  • “Snowflakes” poem (from Lesson 11; one to display)
  • Brave Irene (one for teacher read-aloud)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Role-Play Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 11)
  • Brave Irene anchor chart (begun in Lesson 11; added to during Work Time C; see supporting materials)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
  • Weather journals (from Lesson 6; page 7; one per student and one to display)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Crayons (class set; variety of colors per student)
  • Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Paper microphones (from Unit 1, Lesson 12; one per group)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Developing Language: “Snowflakes” Poem (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group. Tell them that they are going to practice the words and motions to the poem they learned in the last lesson.
  • Display the “Snowflakes” poem.
  • While still displaying the text, complete a first read of the text, reading slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Invite students to stand up.
  • Chorally read aloud the first line, “The snowflakes are falling by ones and by twos,” and invite students to responsibly act out the motions they learned in the previous lesson. Model if necessary.
  • Repeat the above steps for Lines 2–4.
  • Read aloud the entire poem and act it out with the motions.
  • Invite students to sit back down.
  • Tell students that today they will continue reading Brave Irene.
  • Consider providing differentiated mentors by seating students who may be more comfortable reading aloud in a large group near students who may not feel as comfortable. (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Aloud: Brave Irene, Pages 14–28 (15 minutes)

  • Display Brave Irene and briefly flip through pages 1–13.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What happened in Brave Irene so far?” (Irene is trying to deliver a dress to the duchess because her mother is sick. She is traveling through snow and wind to try to get to the palace, but the wind and snow are very powerful. When we stopped reading yesterday, Irene was sitting in the snow holding her hurt leg.)

  • While still displaying the text, complete a first read of pages 14–28, reading slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Tell students you are going to read several pages from the text, and then they are going to use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to answer questions with an elbow partner. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Reread the top of page 17. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What happened to Irene?” (She is buried in the snow, because I don’t see her body and I heard the word buried.)

  • Briefly define buried (covered).
  • Reread page 19. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What does Irene do after she uncovers herself?” (Irene jumps on the box and slides down the hill.)

“The text says, ‘The box shot forward, like a sled.’ What is a sled?” (something used to travel over snow and ice)

  • Invite students to look at the pictures on page 20 and Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What does Irene find on the tree?” (I think she finds the dress.)

  • Reread page 22. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“Why did the people in the palace cheer?” (They cheered because she had made it to the palace in the snow.)

  • Turn to page 27. Again, invite students to study the picture and then Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“How did Irene get home?” (She rode in a sleigh.)

  • Reread page 28. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What did the duchess think about Irene?” (The duchess said Irene was brave and loving because she wrote that in a note to Irene’s mother.)

  • Tell students that they will now have a chance to act out parts of the story to help them understand it better.
  • When discussing the word buried, clarify vocabulary by connecting the term to students’ experiences and prior knowledge. Example: “Let’s think of some other ways to use the word buried. When I’m on the beach, my sister scooped sand all over me until I was buried in sand. What else have you been buried in?” (leaves, blankets, ball pit) (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Ask students about the phrase from the text, “hugging the trunk of a tree.” Examples:
    • “Is the dress really hugging the tree? What is happening in the story?” (The wind blew the dress against the tree trunk.)
  • Draw a diagram of a tree and ask:
    • “What part of the tree is the trunk?” (the big, tall part that comes up from the ground; student points to or labels the trunk)
    • “What is the setting of this part of the story?” (outside; outside the duchess’s house)
    • “How does this part of the story show how the weather affects the characters?” (The wind blew the dress somewhere, and Irene found it there.)

B. Role-Playing: Brave Irene (10 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to participate in the Role-Play protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in the previous lesson and review using the Role-Play Protocol anchor chart as necessary.
  • If necessary, model any steps from the protocol that were challenging for students during the previous lesson.
    • Invite students to stand up and face an elbow partner.
    • Reread the bottom of page 17 of Brave Irene aloud.
    • Invite students to engage in the Role-Play protocol. Circulate and support them as necessary.
    • Repeat the above steps with the text on pages 18–21 of Brave Irene.
    • Invite students to return to their seats.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on following specific steps of the Role-Play protocol. (Example: “I noticed that everyone made tent arms with their partners after they were finished role-playing.”)
  • Remind students that acting out parts of stories can help us understand the story better.
  • If productive, cue students to think about their thinking:

“How does our role-play help us understand the story? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • When reviewing the Role-Play Protocol anchor chart, provide alternatives for auditory information by displaying page 17 of the text on a document camera. (MMR)

C. Shared Writing: Brave Irene Story Elements (10 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Brave Irene anchor chart.
  • Tell students that now that they’ve had an opportunity to read and role-play portions of Brave Irene, they will think about some of the important parts of the story. Specifically, they will identify the events of the story.
  • Direct students’ attention to the learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can identify the major events in the text Brave Irene.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target.
  • Redirect students’ attention to the Brave Irene anchor chart and review the following definitions:
    • major (very important)
    • events (things that happen)
  • Put the two words together to further clarify the target for students: “Today we are going to find the very important things that happen in the story Brave Irene.”
  • Invite students to put on their imaginary reading detective glasses so they can look for clues that will help them identify the major events.
  • Display pages 2–3 of Brave Irene and prompt students to look for clues in the pictures.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What is the first very important thing that happens in the story?” (Irene’s mother is sick, so Irene prepares to take the dress to the palace because her mother cannot.)

  • As students share out, capture their responses on the Brave Irene anchor chart in the first event box and add visuals to accompany it (see Teaching Notes).
  • While still displaying the text, slowly flip through pages 12–19 and invite students to look for clues in the pictures about the major events.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What are two or three other important events that happened in the story after Irene left her house with the dress? It might be helpful to think about some of the events that we acted out during our role-play.” (Irene battled with wind and snow; she got buried in the snow; she pulled herself out; she slid down the hill on the box.)

  • As students share out, capture their ideas in the middle events box of the Brave Irene anchor chart, along with corresponding visuals. Refer to the Brave Irene anchor chart (completed, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What are the important events at the end of the story?” (Irene finds the dress on a tree and takes it to the duchess. Then she gets a sleigh ride back to her house.)

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the third events box on the Brave Irene anchor chart.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback. (Example: “You were careful reading detectives today as you looked for clues in the pictures to help you figure out what the major events were.”)
  • Tell students that you have one final question for them to think about on their own:

“How did the snowy and windy weather affect Irene?” (She had to work really hard to make it to the palace; she kept going even though the wind and snow were challenging; she persevered through the difficult weather.)

  • Invite students to think independently and then put a hand on their head when they have an idea.
  • After 30 seconds of think time, cold call on two or three students to share their ideas. Track them on the bottom of the Brave Irene anchor chart.
  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • If students do not make the connection to perseverance, be sure to tell them that Irene demonstrated that character trait as she kept going even when the wind and snow were making the journey difficult for her.
  • For ELLs: Practice sequencing events by prompting students to discuss some of the major events that take place each day at school. (Example: “First, we have morning message. Next, we eat lunch. Last, we line up to go home.”)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Independent Writing: Weather Journals (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that just like Irene, they, too, can be affected by the weather. Remind them that their weather journals are one way to help them think about how the day’s weather might affect them.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather.”

  • Tell students that today they will complete Steps 1–4 on page 7 of their weather journal.
  • Direct students’ attention to the High-Quality Work anchor chart and review as necessary.
  • Display the page 7 of the weather journal.
  • Model completing Step 4 of the sample weather journal page 7:
  1. Read the prompt aloud: “Today would be a good day to ________.”
  2. Think aloud:

“Let’s see, today’s weather is ______, so I think it would be a good day to _____.” (This think-aloud will vary based on the day’s weather, but an example is “Today’s weather is warm and sunny, so I think it would be a good day to play outside.”)

  1. Model drawing a picture in the box to represent the activity.
  • With excitement, invite students to give their neighbor a high-five if they are ready to persevere to complete the new challenge of Steps 1, 2, 3, and 4!
  • Point out the pencils, crayons, and weather journals already at students’ workspaces. Direct them to page 7 and invite them to begin working.
  • Give students 5–7 minutes to work, circulating and engaging with them about their work. Reread the sentence frames and refer students to the Weather Word Wall as needed. Consider prompting students by asking:

“Why would these clothing pieces help you to be prepared for today’s weather?”

“Why did you choose this picture/word to describe today’s weather?”

“Why is this activity a good match for today’s weather?”

  • Signal students to stop working through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle.
  • Model cleanup, keeping directions clear and brief. Invite students to tiptoe to the whole group gathering area, bringing their weather journals with them for the Closing.
  • To help students express their ideas in the weather journal, offer options for drawing utensils (examples: thick markers, colored pencils), writing tools (examples: fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards), and scaffolds (examples: picture cues, shared writing, extended time). (MMAE)

B. Small Group Share: Weather Journals (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the third one aloud:

“I can share a report of the weather with others.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target.
  • Tell students that today they will share their weather report with a small group of classmates.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart and Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart and briefly review them.
  • Tell students that today they will choose only two steps of their weather journal to read aloud, instead of the whole page like they have done in past sessions.
  • Say:

“Today I am most proud of Steps 2–3, so I am going to share those.”

  • Model sharing page 7 of the weather journal using a paper microphone.
  1. Read Step 2 aloud.
  2. Read Step 3 aloud, pointing to the selected clothing picture(s).
  • Remind students that the person with the microphone is the one who shares, and then passes the microphone to the next person.
  • Move students into groups and distribute paper microphones.
  • Invite students to begin sharing page 7 of their weather journals.
  • As students share, circulate and provide reminders about sharing and taking turns as needed. If needed, re-model how to share Steps 1–3.
  • After 3–4 minutes, signal all students to stop working through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle.
  • Gather students back together and give them specific, positive feedback regarding their sharing. (Example: “I noticed Damien read his weather report slowly and clearly as he shared, and Octavia listened carefully as her group members shared their reports.”)
  • Before students share the weather journal pages, foster community by discussing how to make a comment on a peer’s work. (Example: “When someone in my group is sharing, I might see something I like about their work. When that person is done sharing, it is a good time to give a compliment. What are some ways we might give a compliment or tell someone we like their work?”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Create groups with varying levels of language proficiency. The students with greater language proficiency can serve as models in the group, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames. If possible, consider grouping students who speak the same home language together to help one another interpret and comprehend the conversation in their home language.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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