Reading Aloud and Writing: Umbrella, Part I and Weather Journals | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

You are here

ELA GK:M2:U2:L13

Reading Aloud and Writing: Umbrella, Part I and Weather Journals

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.3: With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
  • W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • SL.K.2: Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.
  • SL.K.5: Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can identify the characters and setting in the text Umbrella. (RL.K.3, SL.K.2)
  • I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather. (W.K.2, SL.K.5, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Times A and B, listen in as students Think-Pair-Share in response to questions about Umbrella. Track students’ progress on the Reading Literature Checklist for this module. (RL.K.1, RL.K.3)
  • During Closing A, circulate and observe students as they complete page 8 of the weather journal independently. Watch for them to observe and accurately name and describe the day’s weather conditions, as well as generate a quality illustration while completing Step 4. (W.K.2, SL.K.4)
  • During Closing B, listen for students to share ways they showed perseverance. (SL.K.1, SL.K.1a)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Developing Language: “Clouds” Poem (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading Aloud: Umbrella, Pages 1–11 (15 minutes)

B. Role-Playing: Umbrella (10 minutes)

C. Shared Writing: Umbrella Story Elements (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Independent Writing: Weather Journals (15 minutes)

B. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Work Time A, students are introduced to a new text, Umbrella. In this text, students meet another character, Momo, who is affected by the weather. During this focused read-aloud, students answer text-dependent questions after hearing the text read aloud. These questions are found directly in the body of the lesson; they have a skill-based focus for reading and are fewer in number than in a close read-aloud. (RL.K.1, RL.K.3)
  • Students continue to build independence and stamina as writers as they complete all the sections of the weather journal. (W.K.2, L.K.6, SL.K.5)

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Work Time follows the same sequence as Lessons 11–12. Students engage in a portion of a focused read-aloud, role-play key excerpts from the text, and then complete one part of an anchor chart in which they identify the characters and setting of the story.
  • Students continue to work on their weather journals, this time attending to quality in Step 4. As in Lesson 12, they draw a picture that shows what type of activity they might like to do in this type of weather.
  • Students continue to think about perseverance and consider how they might show this habit of character when facing a challenge in their work.
  • Continue to use Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may find it difficult to reflect on their demonstration of perseverance. As students work, name specific behaviors that show perseverance and provide examples that will support them to articulate their own progress toward this habit of character.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 15, students complete the Unit 2 Assessment, in which they work more independently with a new text about a character who is affected by the weather (One Hot Summer Day by Nina Crews) and identify the character, setting, and major events of the text.
  • In Unit 3, students will write their own narrative stories about how the weather affected a character, so the reading of Umbrella is scaffolding toward building an understanding of story structure and elements. Students will apply their understanding of story elements as they plan, write, and revise their own stories later in the module.
  • Throughout Lessons 7–14, students work daily to complete a weather journal page independently. Across the arc of these lessons, the weather journal page includes more steps to complete. Students also focus on honing the quality of their work through a series of mini lessons focused on various criteria of high-quality work. Students will continue to identify and meet criteria of quality as they write their own narratives in Unit 3.
  • At the end of Unit 3, students will share their weather journals during a Weather Expo, the culmination of the entire module.

In Advance

  • Since many kindergarteners do not yet decode words independently, visuals are a helpful addition to anchor charts. Consider disassembling and cutting images from an extra copy of Umbrella to use on the Umbrella anchor chart. See recommended images on the Umbrella anchor chart in the supporting materials.
  • Preview the Rainbow cheer to be used at the end of the lesson (see supporting materials).
  • Distribute materials for Closing A at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Post: Learning targets, Weather Journal: Page 8 Model, Weather Journal: Page 8 Non-Model, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Record the whole group reading the “Clouds” poem and saying the Rainbow cheer and post them on a teacher web page or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to listen to at home with their families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • If students were recorded participating in the Think-Pair-Share protocol in Unit 1, sharing their weather journal, or role-playing in previous lessons, consider playing these recordings to remind them of the process.
  • Create the Umbrella anchor chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.
  • Students complete their weather journals using word-processing software, such as Google Docs.
  • Students use speech-to-text facilities activated on devices or use an app or software like Dragon Dictation.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.B.6, K.I.C.10, and K.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing opportunities to deepen comprehension and practice oral language by reading and acting out key events from the text Umbrella.
  • ELLs may benefit from additional practice identifying story elements. Guide students through a Mini Language Dive conversation during Work Time A to reinforce comprehension of academic language and practice identifying story elements.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time B, challenge students to use language from the Mini Language Dive as they act out events from Umbrella. (Example: “The sun is brighter than ever!”)

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, empower students to ask their partners for help if they are not sure what to say. Encourage them to say, “line,” if they feel stuck. Their partners can then suggest something for them to say.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Students are introduced to the poem “Clouds” in the Opening. This poem requires students to make an inference to understand that the poem’s author is referring to clouds shaped like white sheep. As you prepare for reading the “Clouds” poem, offer alternatives for auditory information by drawing a cloud in the shape of a sheep. As you read the poem and discuss what the author means by “white sheep,” display the drawing alongside the poem.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During Work Time A, some students may benefit from sensory input and opportunities for movement while they are sitting. Provide options for differentiated seating, such as sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During the Closing, students reflect on how they persevered in their learning. This is an opportunity to help students see the value and relevance of persevering. After students share how they persevered, optimize value by discussing the outcomes of their hard work.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • N/A

Review:

  • cumulus, character, setting, clue, perseverance (L)

Materials

  • “Clouds” poem (one to display)
  • Umbrella (one for teacher read-aloud)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Role-Play Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 11)
  • Umbrella anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time C; see supporting materials)
  • Umbrella anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
  • Weather Journal: Page 8 Model (one to display)
  • Weather Journal: Page 8 Non-Model (one to display)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Crayons (class set; variety of colors per student)
  • Weather journals (from Lesson 6; page 8; one per student)
  • Perseverance anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)
  • Rainbow cheer (for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Developing Language: “Clouds” Poem (5 minutes)

  • Gather whole group. Tell students that they are going to learn a new poem and create motions to match the words in the poem.
  • Display the “Clouds” poem.
  • While still displaying the text, complete a first read of the poem, reading slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“When the writer says ‘white sheep,’ what is she really talking about?” (clouds)

“What kind of clouds that we learned about might look the most like sheep?” (cumulus)

  • Tell students: “I’m going to read it aloud again, and this time think about what the clouds are doing.”
  • Reread the poem aloud.
  • Invite students to stand up.
  • Chorally read aloud the first two lines: “White sheep, white sheep/On a blue hill.”
  • Ask:

“What motion might we use to show this first line?” (Responses will vary, but may include: moving hands around the body to show a fluffy cumulus cloud.)

  • Reread the line aloud as a group and add the agreed-upon motion.
  • Repeat the above steps for Lines 3/4, 5/6, and 7/8.
  • Once each line has been read and motions have been determined, read aloud the entire poem and act it out with the motions.
  • Invite students to sit back down.
  • Tell students that today they get to read an exciting new book about a character who is affected by the weather.
  • Invite students to push the button on their brain to show that they are ready to learn!
  • For ELLs: When preparing to read the “Clouds” poem, offer alternatives for auditory information by drawing a cloud in the shape of a sheep. As you read the poem and discuss what the writer means by “white sheep,” display the drawing alongside the poem. (MMR)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Aloud: Umbrella, Pages 1–11 (15 minutes)

  • Display Umbrella. Share with students that they can continue to learn about how weather affects people by reading this book. Draw students’ attention to the title of the book and read it aloud.
  • Point out that some pages of the Umbrella include a word in Japanese and the translation in English. On each of these pages, read the Japanese word along with the translation. Invite students who know each word in other languages to share different translations.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Based on the title of this book, what kind of weather do you think this story might be about?” (rain)

  • While still displaying the text, complete a first read of pages 1–13, reading slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What was this part of the book mostly about?” (Momo got an umbrella and red boots for her birthday. She waited and waited for a rainy day to use them, but so far, there has only been a sunny and windy day.)

  • Tell students that you are going to read several pages from the text, and then they are going to use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to answer questions with an elbow partner. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Reread the bottom of page 4 and display the picture on page 5. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What did Momo receive for her birthday?” (red boots and an umbrella)

  • Reread page 8 and display the picture. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“Why does Momo want to use her umbrella today?” (to keep the bright sun off of her)

  • Reread page 10 and display the picture. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“Why does Momo want to use her umbrella today?” (to protect her eyes from the wind)

  • If productive, cue students to provide reasoning:

“Why do you think that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Ask:

“What does her mother tell her after she says she needs the umbrella for the sun and wind?” (Her mother tells her to save the umbrella for a rainy day.)

  • Tell students that they will read the rest of Umbrella in the next lesson to find out if Momo gets to use her umbrella and red rubber boots!
  • When preparing students for the read-aloud, provide options for physical action and sensory input by differentiating seating. Some students might benefit from sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about the meaning of chunks of this key sentence from the text: “Momo was more impatient than ever, because the sun was brighter than ever.” Write and display student responses next to the chunks. Examples:
    • Place your finger on the chunk “Momo was more impatient than ever” and ask:
      • “What character is this sentence about?” (Momo)
    • Point to the prefix im- and ask:
      • “If patient means being able to wait, what do you think impatient means?” (not wanting to wait)
      • “What does ‘more than ever’ mean?” (more than any other time)
      • “When were you more impatient than ever?” (I was more impatient than ever when [I got a new toy; I was waiting to eat lunch].
    • Place your finger on the chunk: “because the sun was brighter than ever” and ask:
      • “Why was Momo so impatient?” (The sun was bright, and she wanted to use her umbrella.)
      • “If the sun was brighter than ever, what does that tell us about the sun? How do you know?” (It was really bright. The suffix -er + than means “more than,” so the sun was more bright than ever before.)
      • “What is the setting of this part of the story? How do you know?” (Momo’s kitchen; the illustration has an egg and milk)
      • “How does this part of the story show how the weather affects the characters?” (The sun makes Momo impatient because she wants to use her umbrella.)

B. Role-Playing: Umbrella (10 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to participate in the Role-Play protocol to better understand the text. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review using the Role-Play Protocol anchor chart as necessary.
  • If necessary, model any steps from the protocol that were challenging for students during the previous lesson.
    • Invite students to stand up and face an elbow partner.
    • Reread page 4 of Umbrella aloud.
    • Invite students to engage in the Role-Play protocol. Circulate and support them as necessary.
    • Repeat the above steps with the text on pages 6, 8, and 10 of Umbrella.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on following specific steps of the Role-Play protocol. (Example: “I noticed that everyone listened carefully to the text before they started role-playing.”)
  • Remind students that acting out parts of stories can help us understand the story better
  • For ELLs: As students act out events from Umbrella, challenge them to use the Japanese words found on pages 2, 6, 12, and 30. This will provide an opportunity for students to transfer their language skills and to celebrate different languages and cultures.

C. Shared Writing: Umbrella Story Elements (10 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Umbrella anchor chart.
  • Tell students that now that they’ve had an opportunity to read and role-play portions of Umbrella, they will think about some of the important parts of the story. Specifically, they will identify the characters and setting of the story.
  • Direct students’ attention to the learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can identify the characters and setting in the text Umbrella.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target.
  • Redirect students’ attention to the Umbrella anchor chart and review the definition of character (a person in a story).
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner

“Who is the main character we have met so far in Umbrella?” (Momo, a little girl)

  • Write the character’s name on the Umbrella anchor chart below the “character” box and add a visual to accompany it (see Teaching Notes).
  • Briefly remind students of the definition of the word setting (the time and place in which something happens).
  • Say:

“As I flip through pages 2–10 of the text, look for clues that might help you figure out what the setting is. Remind students that clues are hints that the writer gives us. Clues can be in the words and pictures. Invite students to put on their special reading detective glasses (model gesture as needed)”.

  • While still displaying the text, slowly turn pages 2-10.
  • Again, invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What is the setting of this story? How do you know?” (Momo’s house in the city; we can see her bed and breakfast plate; outside the window are tall buildings and people)

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the “setting” box and add visuals to accompany them (see Teaching Notes). Refer to the Umbrella anchor chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback. (Example: “You were careful readers today as you looked for clues in the picture to help you figure out what the setting was.”)
  • For ELLs: Circulate as students Think-Pair-Share about the setting of Umbrella. If students need additional support, guide information processing by giving explicit prompts. (Example: “Where was Momo? What furniture do you see on this page that tells you where she is?”) (MMR)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Independent Writing: Weather Journals (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that Momo is a fictional character who is excited about using her new weather clothing. Today they will continue to think about clothing that will help them be prepared for any type of weather as they complete their weather journals.
  • Remind students that just like in other lessons, today they will record the daily weather on their own.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather.”

  • Direct students’ attention to the High-Quality Work anchor chart and review as necessary.
  • Tell students that today they are going to focus on what makes high-quality work in Step 4 of their journals.
  • Display the Weather Journal: Page 8 Model and Weather Journal: Page 8 Non-model side by side.
  • Invite students to compare Step 4 only of the model and the non-model.
  • Point to the model and focus students on Step 4. Ask:

“What do you notice about this step of the weather journal?” (The drawing has details; it fills the space in the box.)

  • Point to the non-model and focus students on Step 4. Ask:

“What do you notice about this step of the weather journal?” (The drawing is very small; you can’t see what it is.)

  • Share that today students will complete Steps 1–4 of page 8 in their weather journal. Today the challenge is to create a large and detailed drawing in Step 4.
  • Point out the pencils, crayons, and weather journals already at student workspaces. Direct them to page 8 and invite them to begin working.
  • Give students 7–9 minutes to complete page 8 of their weather journal. As they work, circulate and engage with them about their work. Reread the sentence frames and refer students to the Weather Word Wall as needed. Consider prompting students asking:

“Can you tell me about the picture you are drawing in Step 4?”

“What details might make your drawing even more high-quality?”

  • Signal all students to stop working through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle. Model cleanup, keeping directions clear and brief. Invite students to walk safely to the whole group gathering area, bringing their weather journals with them for Closing B.
  • When displaying the model and non-model from page 8 of the weather journal, emphasize the importance of process and effort by prompting students to review strategies for what to do if they make a mistake. Example: “High-quality work means that I’ve tried my best to color carefully and write neatly. If I make a mistake, I do not need to feel upset. Who can remind me of some strategies I can use if I make a mistake?” (take a deep breath; be flexible; remember that high quality means trying your best) (MME)

B. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Perseverance anchor chart and read it aloud while tracking the print:
    • “I challenge myself.”
    • “When something is hard, I keep trying.”
    • “I ask for help if I need it.”
  • Say:

“We’ve been talking about the word perseverance the last several days. Let’s practice saying the word together again. It’s a big word!”

  • Invite students to say perseverance aloud several times with you.
  • Pointing to each corresponding icon on the Perseverance anchor chart, remind students that the mountain shows a big challenge, the mountain climber shows a person who keeps going, and the helping hand picture shows someone getting help when it’s needed. All are important parts of perseverance: to try challenges, to keep going, and to ask for help.
  • Share that when people show perseverance, they persevere.
  • Model using the word in a sentence: “Brave Irene persevered to get the dress to the duchess.”
  • If needed, remind students that perseverance means when you try a challenge, keep going, or ask for help.
  • Ask:

“How did you persevere today when you were completing your weather journal?” (Responses will vary, but may include: trying hard to color neatly or write a word; asking for help to locate a weather word.)

  • Provide a sentence starter:
    • “I persevered today as a learner by ______.”
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share their reflection.
  • Refocus the group and invite several students to share their responses. Refer to the Perseverance anchor chart as needed to help students connect their actions to the aspects of perseverance listed on the chart.
  • If productive, cue students to think about their thinking:

“What did you do today that helped you identify characters and settings? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • End the lesson with the Rainbow cheer! Model it briefly and then invite students to join in. Refer to the Rainbow cheer (for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • After students share how they persevered, optimize value by discussing the outcomes of perseverance. (Example: “Many of you shared ways you persevered during writing time today. What did you notice happened when you persevered? How does persevering help you in school?”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: As students complete the sentence starter “I persevered as a learner today by ________,” remind them that the next word will always end in -ing. Prompt students to generate -ing words that might help them complete their thoughts. (Examples: thinking, working, writing)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up