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ELA GK:M2:U2:L10

Reading, Writing, and Speaking: Close Read-aloud Culminating Task and Reporting like a Meteorologist

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.2: With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
  • RL.K.4: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).
  • W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.6: Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can describe how the changing weather affects Tess and Mamma in the text Come On, Rain! (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.4, RL.K.7)
  • I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather. (W.K.2, SL.K.5)
  • I can share a report of the weather with others. (SL.K.4, L.K.6, SL.K.1a)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the Culminating Task: Before and After the Rain of the Close Read-aloud, Session 5, use the Reading Literature Checklist to assess students’ progress toward RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.4, and RL.K.7.
  • During Work Time B, circulate and observe students as they complete page 5 of their weather journals independently. Watch for them to correctly identify the clothing pieces needed for the day’s weather in Step 3 while continuing to observe and accurately record the weather conditions in Steps 1–2. Also watch for students to color carefully and write neatly. (W.K.2, SL.K.4)
  • During the Closing, circulate and observe students as they share page 5 of their weather journal in small groups. Watch for them to meet the criteria on the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart with a larger audience. (SL.K.1a, SL.K.4, SL.K.6)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Interactive Word Wall: Building Vocabulary (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 5: Come On, Rain! and Culminating Task (25 minutes)

B. Independent Writing: High-Quality Work in Weather Journals (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Small Group Share: Weather Journals (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • Session 5 of the close read-aloud contains the culminating task, but students should experience this part of the lesson as routine. Do not overemphasize the assessment; instead, use this as an opportunity to continue to gather meaningful data. (RL.K.1, W.K.2)
  • During Work Time B, students begin to complete a new step in their weather journal routine. In Step 3, students consider which items of clothing would be most appropriate to wear given the day’s weather. This step connects to the second unit guiding question—“How does weather affect people?”—and encourages students to consider how they are affected each day by the weather in the practical decision of what to wear.
  • In the Closing, students share page 5 of their weather journals in a small group so they begin to experience sharing in front of a larger audience than a partner. (SL.K.1a, SL.K.4, SL.K.6)

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • As in Lessons 6–9, students continue the routine of completing a page in their weather journals. Today they are introduced to Step 3. In this step, students consider which clothing pieces would be most appropriate to wear given the daily weather conditions.
  • Continue to use Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Some students may find it challenging to take turns while sharing their weather journals in a small group setting. If needed, re-model how to pass the paper microphone to support appropriate sharing.

Down the road:

  • In Lessons 11–14, students will complete Steps 1–4 of a page in their weather journals. They also will learn a third criterion of high-quality work: using detail. Students will continue to hone their ability to create high-quality work by examining examples and non-examples, as well reflecting on their own work.

In Advance

  • Predetermine small groups (four or five students) for working together during the Interactive Word Wall protocol. Consider creating groups with a variety of language strengths and needs.
  • Prepare the Interactive Word Wall card sets and arrow card sets (see supporting materials).
  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide for Come On, Rain! (Session 5; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Distribute materials for Work Time B at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Review the Interactive Word Wall protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, sample page 5 of weather journal, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • If students were recorded participating in the Interactive Word Wall protocol in Unit 1, consider playing the recordings to remind students of the process.
  • Students complete their Before and After the Rain response sheet and weather journals using word-processing software, such as Google Docs.
  • Students use speech-to-text facilities activated on devices or use an app or software like Dragon Dictation.
  • If students were recorded sharing their weather Journal in Lesson 6, consider playing these recordings to remind them of the process.
  • Video-record students’ small group share of weather journals to watch with students to evaluate strengths and areas for improvement. Post it on a teacher web page or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to watch at home with their families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.B.6, K.I.C.10, and K.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to participate in a culminating task after reading Come On, Rain!, which will require students to synthesize their learning from the previous four lessons.
  • In Work Time A, ELLs are invited to participate in a Language Dive conversation (optional). This conversation guides them through expanding the meaning of a sentence from the text Come On, Rain! It also provides students with further practice using the language structure from the text. Students may draw on this sentence when discussing how the weather affects the characters in the text and when completing their performance tasks. Preview the Language Dive Guide and consider how to invite conversation among students to address the questions and goals suggested under each sentence strip chunk (see supporting materials). Select from the questions and goals provided to best meet your students' needs.
  • Create a “Language Chunk Wall”—an area in the classroom where students can display and categorize the academic phrases discussed in the Language Dive. During the Language Dive, students are invited to place the Language Dive sentence strip chunks on the Language Chunk Wall into corresponding categories, such as “Nouns and noun phrases” or “Language to talk about purpose.” Students can then refer to the wall after the Language Dive and during subsequent lessons. For this lesson, the categories are “Nouns and noun phrases” and “Adjectives and language to describe.”

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • During the Language Dive, challenge students to generate questions about the sentence before asking the prepared questions. Example: “What questions can we ask about this sentence? Let’s see if we can answer them together.”
  • In preparation for the Unit 2 Assessment, post the sentence frame from the Language Dive, “First, [character] is _______. Last, [character] is _______.” Students can draw from their experience with this structure as they write and draw about the sequence of events in The Umbrella.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time A, distribute a partially filled-in copy of the Before and After the Rain response sheet. This will provide students with models for the kind of information they should enter while reducing the volume of work required.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students revisit the Interactive Word Wall once more. In addition to visuals, providing physical information can reinforce the meanings of vocabulary words for students. As you prepare the Interactive Word Wall cards, offer alternatives for visual information by adding touch equivalents (tactile graphics or objects of reference) to represent concepts.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): Kindergartners will demonstrate a wide range of writing skills and may benefit from additional writing supports. To help students express their ideas in the weather journal, offer options for drawing utensils, writing tools, and scaffolds.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During the Closing, students will pass a paper microphone to members of a small group and take turns sharing their work. This is an opportunity to teach positive behavioral strategies and to foster community. As you model sharing and passing the microphone, invite students to brainstorm what to do if someone forgets to pass the microphone on.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

No new vocabulary for this lesson.

Materials

  • Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 9)
  • Interactive Word Wall cards (one set per group)
  • Arrow cards (one set per group)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Module 1; one to display)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Come On, Rain! (Session 5; for teacher reference)
    • Come On, Rain! (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Reading Literature Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 2)
    • After the Rain anchor chart (from Lesson 7; added to during Work Time A; see Close Read-aloud Guide)
    • Before and After the Rain response sheet (one per student)
  • Weather journals (from Lesson 6; page 5; one for teacher modeling and one per student)
  • Unit 2 Guiding Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Crayons (class set; variety of colors per student)
  • Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Paper microphones (from Unit 1, Lesson 12; one for teacher modeling and one per group)
  • Language Dive Guide (optional; for ELLs; for teacher reference; see supporting materials)
  • Sentence strip chunks (one to display, see supporting materials)
  • A spray bottle or water mister for use during the Language Dive (optional; for ELLs)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Interactive Word Wall: Building Vocabulary (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group gathering area.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Interactive Word Wall protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary using the Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol in small groups using the Interactive Word Wall cards and arrow cards.
  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What two words did you connect, and why?” (Responses will vary, but should include naming the two words and explaining their connection.)

  • Invite several students to share out.
  • When preparing the Interactive Word Wall cards, offer alternatives for visual information by adding touch equivalents (tactile graphics or objects of reference) to represent concepts. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Check for comprehension by inviting students to paraphrase the rationale for each connection in their own words. Restate or rephrase as necessary. (Example: “Tess is waiting for the rain. Jordan, can you tell me in your own words why we connected Tess and rain?”)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 5: Come On, Rain! Pages 27–28 and Culminating Task (25 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can describe how the changing weather affects Tess and Mamma in the text Come On, Rain!”

  • Emphasize to students that today their focus will be on how the change in the weather affects Tess and her mamma.
  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Come On, Rain! using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Come On, Rain! (Session 5; for teacher reference). Consider using the Reading Literature Checklist during the close read-aloud (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Refer to the guide for the use of the After the Rain anchor chart and Before and After the Rain response sheet.
  • When introducing new terms and phrases, optimize relevance by inviting students to apply the term/phrase as they share real-life examples. (Example: “What is something that soothes you? Raise your hand if you want to share.”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: During or after Work Time A, lead students through a Language Dive (see supporting materials). Refer to the Language Dive Guide (for teacher reference). Display the sentence strip chunks.
  • For ELLs: Briefly review the Language Dive sentence from Lesson 8. Compare it to the sentence from this lesson. Discuss how the details in the two Language Dive sentences illustrate how the weather affected Tess and her mamma before and after the rain. Encourage students to use language from the two Language Dives as they complete their culminating tasks.

B. Independent Writing: High-Quality Work in Weather Journals (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can use high-quality words and pictures to describe what I observe about the weather.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bow and take aim at the target.
  • Introduce the posted page 5 of the weather journal.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite students to respond whole group to complete Steps 1–2:

“What is today’s weather?” (Responses will vary.)

“What word could we use to fill in the sentence ‘Today it is ____ outside’?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Point to Step 3 and read the sentence: “We would be most comfortable wearing _____.” Explain that students will choose one or more clothing pictures to color that show what to wear outside in today’s weather.
  • Still referring to Step 3, point to each clothing picture and read the name below it.
  • Model completing Step 3:
  1. Read the sentence aloud: “We would be most comfortable wearing ______.”
  2. Read several clothing picture names aloud before choosing a few, referring to Steps 1–2 for information about the weather. (Example: “Today the weather is sunny. Also, it is chilly outside. So, we will be most comfortable wearing a jacket and a hat.”)
  3. Color the selected clothing pictures using a crayon.
  4. Read the completed sentence aloud. (Example: “We would be most comfortable wearing a jacket and a hat.”)
  • Direct students’ attention to the Unit 2 Guiding Questions anchor chart and briefly review it.
  • With excitement, invite students to show a thumbs-up or touch their head if they are ready to persevere to complete the big challenge of Steps 1, 2, and 3!
  • Invite students to take the pencils, crayons, and weather journals at their table area, turn to page 5, and begin working.
  • Give students 5–7 minutes to complete page 5 of their weather journals. As they work, circulate and engage with them about their work. Reread the sentence frames and refer students to the Weather Word Wall as needed. Consider prompting students by asking:

“Why would these clothing pieces help you to be prepared for today’s weather?”

“Why did you choose this picture/word to describe today’s weather?”

  • Signal students to stop working through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle. Model cleanup, keeping directions clear and brief. Invite students to walk safely to the whole group gathering area, bringing their weather journals with them for the Closing.
  • To help students express their ideas in the weather journal, offer options for drawing utensils (examples: thick markers, colored pencils), writing tools (examples: fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards), and scaffolds (examples: picture cues, shared writing, extended time). (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: While modeling Part 3 of the weather journal, review the differences between the meanings of the articles of clothing. (Example: “What is the difference between a sweater and a jacket? I see Ingrid is wearing a sweater now. When might she wear her jacket?”)
  • For ELLs: While modeling Part 3 of the weather journal, think aloud to illustrate the meaning of most comfortable. (Example: “Hmm, I would be a little bit comfortable wearing a hat. But my hands would be so cold, so I would be most comfortable wearing gloves.”)
  • For ELLs: Some students may have trouble reading their work aloud. Help them identify key elements of their journal and allow them to repeat words and phrases. (Example: “It looks like you wrote, ‘It is warm outside.’ Watch me point to the words. It. is. warm. outside. Now you try.”)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Small Group Share: Weather Journals (10 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the third one aloud:

“I can share a report of the weather with others.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target.
  • Share that today students will share their weather report with a small group of classmates. Move students into groups.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart and Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart to remind them about sharing a weather report as needed.
  • Model sharing the sample page 5 of the weather journal using a paper microphone.
  1. Read Step 1 aloud, pointing to the selected weather picture.
  2. Read Step 2 aloud.
  3. Read Step 3 aloud, pointing to the selected clothing picture(s).
  • Remind students that the person with the microphone is the one who shares, and then passes the microphone to the next person.
  • Distribute paper microphones and invite students to begin sharing page 5 of their weather journals.
  • As students share, circulate and provide reminders about sharing and taking turns as needed. If needed, re-model how to share Steps 1–3.
  • After 5–7 minutes, signal students to stop working through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle.
  • Gather students back together and give them specific, positive feedback regarding their sharing. (Example: “I noticed Rory read her weather report with a loud and proud voice and pointed to the weather pictures as she shared.”)
  • When modeling how to share and pass the microphone, foster community by asking students to brainstorm what to do if someone forgets to pass the microphone on. (Example: “While you are sharing in small groups, somebody might forget to keep passing the microphone. If you notice this happening, what are some caring ways you could remind your classmate to pass the microphone on?”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Create groups with varying levels of language proficiency. The students with greater language proficiency can serve as models in the group, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames. If possible, consider grouping students who speak the same home language together to help one another interpret and comprehend the conversation in their home language.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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