Reading, Speaking, and Listening: An Introduction to Weather around the World | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA GK:M2:U2:L1

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: An Introduction to Weather around the World

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2: With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.K.4: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about weather around the world using the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, RI.K.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Consider using the Reading Informational Text Checklist during the read-aloud in Work Time B to document student progress toward RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4 (see Assessment Resources and Overview).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Curious Sofia Returns (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Picture Tea Party: Mystery Photos (10 minutes)

B. Reading Aloud: On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather (15 minutes)

C. Engaging the Learner: Introduction to Interactive Map (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Structured Discussion: Reflecting on Responsibility (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson kicks off Unit 2 of this module dedicated to the study of weather and introduces the first Unit 2 guiding question: “What is weather like around the world?”
  • In this lesson, Sofia (the character to whom students were introduced in Unit 1) returns to implore students to continue their study of weather. In the continuation of her story, Sofia and her friend Jack invite students into the study of weather around the world and ask the students to help them answer the first Unit 2 guiding question. Throughout the unit, help foster students’ curiosity and imagination by encouraging them to engage with these imaginary characters and their adventures.
  • In almost all of the lessons in this unit, students hear complex texts read aloud. Primary learners need to hear many texts read aloud to build their word and world knowledge. When possible, display the text when reading aloud. And when doing a first read-aloud of a given text, read fluently, with expression, and without interruption. For additional information, refer to the Module Overview.
  • In Work Time A, students participate in the Picture Tea Party protocol, which was introduced in Unit 1 of this module. Based on how familiar students are with this protocol and how well they are doing with it, consider reallocating class time spent reviewing it.
  • In Work Time B, students are introduced to the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. Over the next couple of lessons, students complete focused read-alouds, answering text-dependent questions after hearing the text read aloud. Unlike a close read-aloud, these questions are fewer, are found directly in the body of the lesson, and have a skill-based focus for reading. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, RI.K.4)
  • The pages of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather are not numbered. For instructional purposes, the page that begins with “In the Arctic, polar bears ride on floes of ice …” should be considered page 1 and all pages thereafter numbered accordingly.
  • During Work Time C, students are introduced to the class interactive map. Throughout the focused read-aloud sessions of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, students use the map to track the different places around the world they read about.
  • In Lessons 1–5 of this unit, students continue to reflect on their progress toward showing responsibility. Spending ample time focused on one habit of character allows students to deepen their understanding and become more adept at reflecting on it.
  • This lesson is the first in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 3: Conversation Cues. Conversation Cues are questions teachers can ask students to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O’Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012. Based on Chapin, S., O’Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K–6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). Goal 3 Conversation Cues encourage students to deepen their thinking. Continue drawing on Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues, introduced in Module 1, and add Goal 3 Conversation Cues to more strategically promote productive and equitable conversation. In Module 3, Goal 4 Conversation Cues are also introduced. See the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper. Examples of the Goal 3 Conversation Cues you will see in the next two units are (with expected responses):
    • To encourage students to provide reasoning or evidence:

 “Why do you think that?”

Student: “Because _____.”

 “What, in the _____ (sentence/text), makes you think so?”

Student: “If you look at _____, it says _____, which means _____.”

    • To challenge students:

 “What if _____ (that word was removed/the main character had done something different/we didn’t write an introduction)? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.”

Student: “If we did that, then _____.”

 “Can you figure out why _____ (the author used this phrase/we used that strategy/there’s an -ly added to that word)? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.”

Student: “I think it’s because _____.”

    • To encourage students to think about their thinking (metacognition):

 “What strategies/habits helped you succeed? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.”

Student: “_____ helped me a lot.”

 “How does our discussion add to your understanding of _____ (previously discussed topic/text/language)? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.”

Student: “I used to think that _____, and now I think that _____.”

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • This lesson invites students to deepen their understanding of weather from Unit 1 by expanding the topics of study to include weather around the world and the different effects of weather on people.
  • Consider how this lesson might build on instructional routines already introduced to students (e.g., Picture Tea Party protocol, Think-Pair-Share protocol, learning targets, weather journal). Make modifications to this lesson and others across the unit based on the familiarity of your students with the instructional routines included in the lessons.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Young learners are grounded in their own experiences of the world. The idea that the weather can be different across the world on the same day might be challenging for some students. This concept will unfold gradually across Lessons 1–5, so do not worry if students are unclear during Lesson 1. Consider when or whether to help them make connections to people or places they know (e.g., it’s snowy today in New York, but my grandma in Florida says it is hot; it’s raining today in Iowa, but my relatives in Mexico are enjoying sunny weather).

Down the road:

  • Throughout this unit, students build upon their growing knowledge of weather by expanding their learning to include weather around the world and its effects on people. Lessons 1–5 of the unit are dedicated to the reading of an informational text. The remainder of the unit focuses on narrative texts about characters experiencing weather, helping students build an understanding of the elements of narrative stories and supporting them to answer the second of the unit’s guiding questions. To help students develop an understanding of narrative texts, consider reading narrative stories aloud throughout this unit and ensuring that they have access to narrative texts on their reading level (see K–5 Recommended Text List).

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Unit 2 Guiding Questions anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • The mystery photos for the Picture Tea Party protocol and determine groups of three or four students for Work Time A.
    • The class interactive map by projecting the map onto large sheets of chart paper and tracing it. Many items will be added to the map throughout the course of Lessons 1–5, so it is important that it is large enough to accommodate mystery photos, Jack doll icons, and Culminating Task response sheets.
    • Jack paper doll icons by copying them on cardstock and cutting them out.
  • Review the Picture Tea Party protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, class interactive map, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Create a slideshow of the world mystery photos.
  • If students were recorded during the Picture Tea Party protocol in Unit 1, consider playing the recording to remind students of the process.
  • Create the class interactive map in an online format, such as a Google Doc or with Google Maps, to display and to share at home with families.
  • Record the whole group saying the lightning cheer and post it on a teacher web page or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to listen to at home with families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standard K.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to participate in sensory activities such as the interactive map and the Picture Tea Party protocol. This will help make abstract concepts more concrete for many ELLs.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to grasp the premise of On the Same Day in March, as the fact that all of the events happen on the same day is not evident in the illustrations. Consider guiding students through the Mini Language Dive discussion during Work Time B to unpack the meaning of temporal prepositional phrases and to reinforce the meaning of the text.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • During the Mini Language Dive, challenge students to generate questions about the phrase before asking the prepared questions. Example: “What questions can we ask about this phrase? Let’s see if we can answer them together.”

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, project a mapping application from a computer or online device. Locate the places that Jack will visit. Zoom in to illustrate the way a map becomes a representation of physical locations. To further illustrate this concept, open up ground-level views of each location.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In Work Time B, students are introduced to On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. Activate background knowledge and supply contextual information by looking at a calendar with the class and discuss what typical weather is like in March in your community.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, students are introduced to a class interactive map. When marking the class location on the map, provide options for physical action by inviting a student volunteer to “connect the dots” between locations by drawing a line with a dry erase marker. As the student volunteer draws a line between the pushpins, encourage the class to put their arms out like airplane wings and pretend to “fly” to the new location.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): The story “Curious Sofia Returns” is read during the Opening. When reading each page, optimize relevance by asking students to share connections to the text based on their own lives.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T);  Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • map (L)

Review:

  • weather (L)

Materials

  • Sofia paper doll (from Unit 1, Lesson 4; one to display)
  • “Curious Sofia Returns” (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Jack paper doll (one to display)
  • Unit 2 guiding questions (written on chart paper; one to display)
  • World mystery photos (one per student)
  • Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Reading Informational Text Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Class interactive map (written on chart paper; one to display)
  • Thumbtacks (nine; used by teacher to mark locations on class interactive map during Work Time C)
  • Jack doll icons (eight; used by teacher to mark locations on class interactive map during Work Time C)
  • Lightning cheer (for teacher reference)
  • Responsibility anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 2)
  • Conversation Partners chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Conversation Norms anchor chart (begun in Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Curious Sofia Returns (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Display the Sofia paper doll.
  • Tell students they have done excellent work becoming weather experts, teaching Sofia, and helping her to be more prepared for all types of weather.
  • Tell students today is an exciting day because you have a new “Curious Sofia” story to read to them and you think Sofia might need more help from them.
  • Display page 1 of “Curious Sofia Returns” and read it aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“According to the story, how did you help Sofia learn how to be prepared for all kinds of weather?” (show her how to observe the weather, teach her what meteorologists do, explain what types of clothing are best for different types of weather)

  • Point to the picture on page 2. Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What do you notice about this picture?” (Sofia has a friend. Sofia looks warm in her sweater. Sofia’s friend is shivering.)

  • Display the Jack paper doll and tell students that this story is about Sofia and her friend Jack.
  • While still displaying the text, read aloud pages 2–3 and, using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What facts about the weather did Sofia learn and share with Jack?” (She learned about moisture and temperature.)

“Why does Jack need Sofia’s help?” (He is going on a trip around the world with his family and doesn’t know what the weather is going to be like, so he doesn’t know what to pack.)

  • While still displaying the text, read aloud page 4 and, using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What are the questions about weather that Sofia and Jack have?” (Sofia and Jack are wondering about the weather around the world. They want to know what the weather is like in different places around the world and how people prepare for it.)

  • Tell students that they get to help Sofia and Jack answer their important questions. Display the Unit 2 guiding questions and read the first one aloud:
    • “What is weather like around the world?”
  • Explain that during the next couple of weeks, students will work hard to help Sofia and Jack answer these questions. Tell them that they will read interesting books, keep a weather journal, role-play experiencing the weather in different places, and write and draw about how people prepare for different types of weather.
  • Reread the last paragraph and tell students it’s time to continue learning about the weather!
  • When stopping to ask questions while reading “Curious Sofia Returns,” optimize relevance by asking students to share connections to the text based on their own lives. (Example: After reading page 3, say: “Give a thumbs-up if you or someone you know has packed a suitcase before. Turn to your elbow partner and share one thing you would put in a suitcase.”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Ask about the phrase “around the world.” Examples:

“What do you think ‘around the world’ means?” (Responses will vary.)

“What shape is the earth, or the world?” (round)

  • Invite students to pretend their finger is going around the world. Ask:

“What are some different places your finger is going as it is moving around the world?” (China, Russia, Canada)

“In your own words, what do you think it means to go around the world?” (to travel to different places and countries in the world)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Picture Tea Party: Mystery Photos (10 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Picture Tea Party protocol to view World Mystery photos. Remind them that they used this protocol in Unit 1 and review as necessary using the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol.
  • Invite students back to the whole group area and collect the mystery photos.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you notice in your pictures?”

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Based on the pictures you saw, what do you think we’ll be learning about today?” (We will learn about different places around the world. We will learn about the weather in different cities. We will learn about rain or snow.)

  • If productive, use a Goal 3 Conversation Cue to encourage students to provide evidence:

“What, in the pictures, makes you think so?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Inform students that the pictures they looked at have to do with the question that Sofia and Jack asked them to help with.
  • Have student volunteers model the Picture Tea Party protocol for the class, and then allow the entire class to practice grouping up with three or four students a few times before asking them to discuss the photos with their group. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: It may take longer for some students to process language and follow the conversation during the Picture Tea Party protocol. Encourage students to speak up when they would like to hear something repeated. Empower them with questions they can ask to regulate the pace of the conversation. (Examples: “Can you please repeat what you said?” or “Can you please speak more slowly?”)

B. Reading Aloud: On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather (15 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning target and read it aloud:

“I can ask and answer questions about weather in different places around the world using the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.”

  • Briefly review the definition of weather (the conditions outside; weather concerns such things as temperature, rain, snow, sun, and other factors)
  • Tell students that you have a new text to share with them today and that this text will help them with the challenge Sofia and Jack posed to them.
  • Display On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • Read the title aloud and tell students that this book describes what the weather is like in different places around the world on the same day in March.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 1–8 aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption, pointing to each word as you read it.
  • Pause after reading page 8. Say:

“I notice that the author is describing the weather in these different places. When I look at the pictures, I notice the people in these places are dressed for the different types of weather.”

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice about the weather in these places? What clues do you get from the pictures?” (I see people wearing scarves in one picture. I see the sky is full of gray clouds in one picture. I see people wearing heavy coats in another picture.)

“Have you ever been to a different city or country? What was the weather like in the place you are thinking of?” (Responses will vary.)

  • If productive, use a Goal 3 Conversation Cue to challenge students:

“What if they were wearing the same clothes in all of the pictures? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • While still displaying the text, continue reading On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather aloud. Pause after reading page 20.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice about the different types of clothing the people are wearing in the different places? What do you notice about what people are doing in those different places?” (In some places, people are wearing shorts and sandals and are outside in the sun. In one place, people wore scarves and hats when they were outside. I saw people wearing bathing suits, swimming at the beach.)

  • While still displaying the text, finish reading On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“After listening to this text, what do you notice about the types of weather happening in different places around the world on the same day in March?” (In some places, it is warm and sunny and people go to the beach. In some places, there is snow and wind and people are bundled up.)

  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“After listening to this text, what questions do you have about the types of weather that happens in all of these different places?”

  • As students share, circulate and listen in. Using the Reading Informational Text Checklist, document progress toward RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4. Take note of the questions students are sharing and target a few students to share out with the whole group.
  • Tell students that in the next lesson they will listen to parts of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather again to learn about the weather in specific places in the world and how people prepare for the weather in those places.
  • Before you read On the Same Day in March, activate or supply background knowledge by looking at a calendar and discussing what the weather is usually like in March in your community. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: During the read-aloud, display the text on a document camera or display an enlarged copy of the text to help direct students to the appropriate sentences on each page.
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about the meaning of chunks of this key phrase from the text: “On the same day in March …” Write and display student responses next to the chunks. Examples:
  • “Let’s take another look at the phrase: “On the same day in March...”
  • “What does this mean?” (Responses will vary.)
  • “What is day in our home languages?” (yawm in Arabic) Invite all students to repeat the translation in a home language other than their own.
    • Read and display the chunk “On the same day” and ask:
  • “What does the chunk tell us?” (It tells us what day; it tells us when something will happen.)
  • “We use the word on when we want to give information about what day something happens. Can you tell me something that happens Tuesday, using the phrase ‘on Tuesday’?” (On Tuesday … we have music; we will go on a field trip; we have gym.)
  • “If we are still talking about Tuesday and I tell you something that happened on the same day, what day would that be? Why?” (Tuesday; because same means you’re still talking about Tuesday, not a different day)
  • “So if you come to class in kindergarten on Tuesday, what is something that a friend or family member does on the same day? (On the same day … my mom works; my friend goes to fifth grade; my sister goes to middle school.)
    • Read and display the chunk “in March” and ask:
  • “What does this chunk tell us?” (the month of the day)
  • “We use the word in when we want to give information about what month something happens. Can you tell me something that happens in March, using the phrase ‘in March’?” (In March … it gets warmer; winter changes to spring; we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day.)
  • “This book is called On the Same Day in March. What is it about?” (things that happen all on the same day in March in different places)
  • “What are some different things that happen on the same day in March?” (On the same day in March … polar bears catch fish; people wear warm clothes; people go to the beach.)

C. Engaging the Learner: Introduction to Interactive Map (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted class interactive map.
  • Point to the word map on the chart and tell students that a map is a picture of an area of the earth or sky drawn or printed on a flat surface. Inform students that this is a map of the entire world.
  • Point to the place where you are located on the map and inform students of the location.
  • Using the thumbtack, mark the class’ location on the map.
  • Invite students to share any places they or their family members have lived. Briefly locate these on the map.
  • Tell students that as the class continues to read On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, they are going to use the map to track the different places they learn about.
  • Remind students that they are reading the text to help Sofia and Jack learn about the weather around the world so that Jack can pack his suitcase and prepare for his trip.
  • Display one Jack doll icon and tell students that just like you marked where the class is located on the map, they are going to mark all the places that Jack is going to visit when he goes on his trip around the world with his family.
  • Preview the places that Jack will visit on his trip by reading aloud the following list:
    • Alberta, Canada
    • Paris, France
    • New York City
    • Xian, China
    • Central Thailand
    • Northern Kenya
    • Darwin, Australia
    • Patagonia, Argentina
  • Reread the list of place names aloud again, slowly, pausing after each one to invite students to repeat the name of the place with you.
  • After reading each place name, locate it on the class interactive map and, using a thumbtack, place a Jack doll icon on it to mark the location Jack will visit with his family.
  • After placing one or two icons on the map, invite student volunteers to place the remaining icons on the map after you have identified the location.
  • After all Jack doll icons have been placed on the map, explain that the weather is different in each of these places because of things like the amount of moisture in the air in each place, how far the sun is from each place, and how much warm air and cool air is present in each place.
  • Tell students that in the next few lessons, they will closely study the text so that they can learn more about the weather in these different places and help Sofia and Jack answer their questions.
  • Inform students that because they have done such hard work today continuing their study of weather, you want to teach them a new weather cheer called the lightning cheer.
  • Model how to do the cheer:
  1. Stand up in your spot.
  2. Raise your hands above your head and point your index fingers to the sky.
  3. Use your index fingers to make zigzags through the air, starting high and moving down in front of your body.
  4. As you move your fingers, say, “Lightning, lightning.”
  5. Keep repeating the motion and the word lightning, slowly getting louder.
  6. Stomp your foot and say, “BOOM! Great job!”
  • Invite students to stand up in their spots and join you in doing the lightning cheer.
  • After marking the class location on the map, provide options for physical action by inviting a student volunteer to “connect the dots” between locations by drawing a line with a dry erase marker. As the volunteer draws a line between the pushpins, encourage the class to put their arms out like airplane wings and pretend to “fly” to the new location. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: As students place the Jack doll icon on the interactive map, display the corresponding pages of On the Same Day in March. This will support students as they make connections between the map and physical locations.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Structured Discussion: Reflecting on Responsibility (10 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Responsibility anchor chart.
  • Remind students that in Unit 1, they focused on learning about and demonstrating the habit of character: Responsibility.
  • Briefly review the definition of responsibility by reading aloud what is on the chart:
    • “I take ownership for my materials, my actions, and my materials and space.”
  • Tell students that they are going to continue learning about responsibility and reflecting on how they are showing this habit of character.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to partner up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with their partner:

“What does responsibility mean to you?” (Responses will vary, but may include: Responsibility means finishing my work; responsibility means helping Sofia and Jack answer their questions; responsibility means putting my materials away and cleaning up my space.)

  • Circulate and listen as students share, ensuring that each partner has an opportunity to answer the question. Take note of how students are interacting with one another and redirect students as needed using the Conversation Norms anchor chart.
  • Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after both partners have shared.
  • Gather students back together and invite a few to share with the whole group.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What are some ways you can continue to show responsibility as we continue to learn about weather?” (Responses will vary, but may include: We can help Jack and Sofia answer their questions; we can learn about the weather in different parts of the world; we can make sure we take care of the big class map.)

  • Give students specific, positive feedback regarding their conversations. (Example: “I noticed that you all mentioned some really great ways that you can continue to show responsibility. It shows me that you are committed to working on that habit of character!”)
  • Remind students that as they continue to study the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather and learn about the weather in different places around the world in the next several lessons, they will be showing responsibility by helping to answer the questions that Sofia and Jack have.
  • For ELLs: Briefly review the learning target from Work Time B. Ask students to provide an example of a question they asked or answered about the weather in different parts of the world. Ask how they showed responsibility as they learned about weather. (I listened carefully to my partner when we were answering questions.)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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