Reading, Speaking, and Listening: The Weather of Canada, France, and Thailand | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA GK:M2:U2:L2

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: The Weather of Canada, France, and Thailand

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2: With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.K.4: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about weather around the world using the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, RI.K.4)
  • I can use details from the text to describe how people prepare for the weather in Alberta, Canada; Paris, France; and central Thailand. (SL.K.1)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the focused read-aloud in Work Time A, use the Reading Informational Text Checklist to track students’ progress toward RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RL.K.4 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to use evidence from the text as they discuss the weather in three specific locations with their partner using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track progress towards SL.K.1 (see the Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Picture Tea Party: Mystery Photos (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud: On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, Pages 3–6 and 17–18 (15 minutes)

B. Partner Role-play and Discussion: Responding to the Text (20 minutes)

C. Shared Writing: Responding to the Text (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Structured Discussion: Reflecting on Responsibility (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students continue to explore how weather is different around the world and how people prepare for different types of weather. They continue to study parts of the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather by engaging in a partner role-play and discussion in response to the text and by participating in a class shared writing activity to capture information gathered from their reading.
  • During Work Time A, students listen to three sections of the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather about weather in three different countries. They answer several text-dependent questions during this focused read-aloud session. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, RI.K.4)
  • During Work Time B, students engage in a partner role-play and discussion. Allowing students an opportunity to speak and listen in response to the text serves as oral rehearsal for the shared writing they will subsequently engage in as a class. (SL.K.1)
  • During Work Time C, students participate in a shared writing activity, which gives them a highly supportive writing opportunity in which they can practice generating ideas, selecting appropriate vocabulary, and rereading writing for fluency.
  • This lesson is the second in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O’Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012. Based on Chapin, S., O’Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K–6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). Goal 3 Conversation Cues encourage students to deepen their thinking. Continue drawing on Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues, introduced in Module 1, and add Goal 3 Conversation Cues to more strategically promote productive and equitable conversation. In Module 3, Goal 4 Conversation Cues are introduced. See the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 1, students listened to the entire text of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather read-aloud. In this lesson, students revisit several sections of the text and answer text-dependent questions to learn about the weather in three specific countries.
  • This lesson invites students to engage in several instructional routines introduced in previous lessons, units, and modules (e.g., Picture Tea Party protocol, paired discussion, Think-Pair-Share protocol). Consider your students’ familiarity with these instructional routines and reallocate time as needed to review them.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may find the partner role-play and discussion challenging. Give those who may struggle a strong partner, seating them near classroom resources such as the Weather Word Wall and Weather around the World anchor chart. Alternatively, consider seating the student(s) close to you and partner with the student(s) yourself.

Down the road:

  • Over the next several lessons, students will continue their focused read-aloud of sections of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. After each session, they will process the text orally with a partner. They then will respond to the text in writing, first as a whole class shared writing activity and eventually in an independent writing task.
  • In this lesson, students focus specifically on describing the weather in different locations across the world. In Lesson 3, students will build upon these descriptions and shift to comparing and contrasting the weather in the different locations studied.
  • In Lesson 5, students will revisit the shared writing that they complete during this lesson.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • The mystery photos for the Picture Tea Party protocol and determine groups of three or four for the Opening.
    • Weather around the World anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • Weather Word Wall cards for chinook and huddle. Write or type the words in large print on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
    • Responding to Text: Canada, France, Thailand chart (see supporting materials).
  • Preview the lesson plan for the focused read-aloud of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, in conjunction with the text, to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Distribute materials (Sofia paper doll, Jack paper doll, Weather Clothing cards) for Work Time B at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Review Picture Tea Party protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)

Post: Learning targets, class interactive map, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Create a slideshow of the Mystery Photos: Canada, France, Thailand images.
  • If students were recorded during the Picture Tea Party or Think-Pair-Share protocols in Unit 1, consider playing the recordings to remind students of the process.
  • Create the Weather around the World and Responding to Text: Canada, France, Thailand charts in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.
  • Use a search engine like Google to find additional pictures or videos of weather in Alberta, Canada; Paris, France; and central Thailand.
  • Video-record students role-playing in Work Time B to review in later lessons as a reminder of what happened. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1 and K.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to read and interpret On the Same Day in March, whose illustrations support the text with detailed depictions of how the weather affects people’s lives in different parts of the world.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to follow the process of the partner discussion role-play while they absorb the information they learned during the read-aloud. Consider providing additional opportunities for modeling and practicing this protocol. See the Meeting Students’ Needs column for suggestions.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time A, briefly review the Mini Language Dive from the previous lesson. Invite students to discuss the places in this lesson’s read-aloud using the phrase “on the same day in March.” (Example: “On the same day in March in Thailand, it’s too hot to plant rice.”)

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, create individual sentence frame cue cards that students can use for prompting during their discussions. Illustrate each part with icons representing place, weather, and clothing. Prompt students to place their manipulative cards in the frame for additional kinesthetic support.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the shared writing activity, students may need additional visual cues to share key details about the weather in each location. When preparing the Responding to Text: Canada, France, Thailand chart, you can highlight critical features of the weather in each place by including a photo to represent each location.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During the focused read-aloud, students study pictures in On the Same Day in March and share observations about weather in three different places. As students share details about the pictures, they may have questions or new insights. Guide information processing and enhance students’ capacity for monitoring progress by inviting them to developing a silent signal to be used when they see something that surprises them.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During the partner role-play and discussion, students may disagree about appropriate weather accessories for Sofia and Jack. When modeling the role-play, foster collaboration by soliciting strategies for resolving a disagreement.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T);  Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • chinook, huddle (T), details from the text (L)

Materials

  • Mystery Photos: Canada, France, Thailand (one per student)
  • Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather (one to display, for teacher read-aloud)
  • Class interactive map (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Weather around the World anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Weather Word Wall cards (new; teacher-created; two)
  • Weather Word Wall (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Weather around the World anchor chart (completed; for teacher reference)
  • Sofia paper doll (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one per pair and one to display)
  • Jack paper doll (from Lesson 1; one per pair and one to display)
  • Weather Clothing cards (one set per pair)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Module 1)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Conversation Norms anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Responding to Text: Canada, France, Thailand chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time C; see supporting materials)
  • Responding to Text: Canada, France, Thailand chart (completed; for teacher reference)
  • Responsibility anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 2)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Picture Tea Party: Mystery Photos (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Remind students that in the previous lesson, they started exploring what the weather is like in different places around the world. Tell them that today they will continue to do so by reading about a few specific places.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Picture Tea Party protocol to view Mystery Photos: Canada, France, Thailand. Remind them that they used this protocol in Unit 1 and review as necessary using the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol.
  • Invite students back to the whole group area and collect the mystery photos.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you notice in your pictures?” (snow on the ground; people dressed in warm clothing; sunny weather; people dressed for warm weather)

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Based on the pictures you saw, what do you think we’ll be learning about today?” (different places and cities; weather in different places)

  • Inform students that the pictures they looked at have to do with the three places they will read about in the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • For ELLs: Review the word predict from Unit 1. Invite students to use the word predict as they guess what they will be learning about today. Use the sentence frame “I predict we will learn about _____.”

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud: On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, Pages 3–6 and 17–18 (15 minutes)

  • Display On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • Briefly review that the text explains that even on the same day in March, in different places around the world, the weather might be different because of things like the amount of moisture in the air, how the sun changes the temperature, and how much warm and cool air is present.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can ask and answer questions about weather around the world using the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.”

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you remember about this text?” (Responses will vary, but may include: The text is about different places around the world; the weather is different around the world; sometimes when it’s winter in one place, it is summer in another.)

  • Tell students that today they will read about the weather in three places: Alberta, Canada; Paris, France; and central Thailand.
  • Using the class interactive map, point out Alberta, Canada; Paris, France; and central Thailand.
    • Place one or two of the first set of mystery photos where Alberta, Canada, is on the map.
    • Place one or two of the second set of mystery photos where Paris, France, is on the map.
    • Place one or two of the third set of mystery photos where central Thailand is on the map.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Weather around the World anchor chart. Pointing to each column of the chart, tell students that they will use the anchor chart to keep track of all the places they read about in the text, what the weather is like in those places, and what people wear and do because of the weather in those places.
  • Tell students that first they will read about Alberta, Canada, and point to it on the class interactive map.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 3–4 aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Show students the Weather Word Wall card for chinook.
    • Explain that the author is using the word chinook to refer to the type of wind that blows in this area of Canada and that it is a warm, dry wind blowing eastward from the Rocky Mountains.
    • Repeat the word two or three times and invite students to join you.
    • Place the Word Wall card and picture for chinook on the Weather Word Wall.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice about the weather in this picture of Alberta, Canada? What do you notice about what the people are wearing and doing?” (I see green grass growing, but there is still snow on the ground. The snow looks like it’s melting. I see people wearing hats. I see skis and sleds in the yard. I see people looking at animals like birds and bears.)

  • As students share responses, clarify and capture their ideas on the Weather around the World anchor chart, writing down the language they use as accurately as possible. If possible, model referring to the Weather Word Wall as a tool to help when spelling content-related words. Refer to the Weather around the World anchor chart (completed, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Tell students that now they will read about Paris, France, and point to it on the class interactive map.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 5–6 aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What does the author say people have to wear in Paris, France, because of the weather?” (The people wear scarves and coats.)

  • Direct students’ attention to the word huddle in the text.
  • Show students the Weather Word Wall card for huddle and tell them it means to gather in a small, close group.
    • Invite one or two student volunteers to gather together in a small, close group with you.
    • Place the Word Wall card and picture for huddle on the Weather Word Wall.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Why do you think the people have to ‘huddle in their scarves and coats,’ as the author says? What does it tell you about the weather?” (They have to huddle because they are cold. It is cold and still feels like winter.)

  • As students share out, clarify and capture their ideas on the Weather around the World anchor chart.
  • Tell students that now they will read about central Thailand and point to it on the class interactive map.
  • Turn to page 17. Before reading, using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice is different about this picture from the previous two pictures we saw?” (In this picture, people are wearing sandals and shorts. In this picture, I see palm trees and a big sun.)

  • While still displaying the text, read pages 17–18 aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Point out that the teacher is writing the word for rice in Thai. What is the translation of rice in our home languages?” (dhāna in Bengali) Call on student volunteers to share. Ask other students to choose one translation in a home language other than their own to quietly repeat. Invite students to say their chosen translation out loud when you give the signal. Chorally repeat the translations and the word in English. Invite self- and peer correction of the pronunciation of the translations and the English.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What is the weather like in central Thailand in March?” (It is hot.)

“What do the people wear because of the weather? What do the people do?” (They wear sandals and short sleeves. They have to be under shade to stay out of the sun. It is too hot to do many things.)

  • As students share out, clarify and capture their ideas on the Weather around the World anchor chart.
  • Review the information gathered on the Weather around the World anchor chart and remind students that the weather in the three countries studied during this lesson is different because of things such as moisture in the air, temperature, and amount of wind.
  • If productive, use a Goal 3 Conversation Cue to encourage students to think about their thinking:

“How does our discussion add to your understanding of weather around the world? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • As students study pictures in On the Same Day in March and share observations about weather in three different places, guide information processing and enhance their capacity for monitoring progress by developing a silent signal to use when they see something that surprises them. (Example: “Sometimes it can be helpful to have a silent signal to keep track of your thinking while I’m reading a book. When we look at these pictures of weather and notice details, you may notice something that surprises you or that you want to learn more about. What is a silent signal you could use when you see something that surprises you or that you have a question about?”) (MMR, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: While reading the learning target, ask students to generate some question words to use when asking questions. Invite students to share a question they have about the text. (Example: How is the weather different in Canada?)
  • For ELLs: As you record student responses on the Weather around the World anchor chart, support comprehension by posting a mystery photo of each place next to written responses. Illustrate each entry by drawing small icons representing each type of weather and piece of clothing. (Example: Draw a sun next to the word sunny.) (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Ask about this sentence from the text: “It’s too hot to plant rice.” Examples:
    • “What does this sentence mean?” (It is so hot that the people can’t plant rice.)
    • “Why do you think that is?” (The rice will grow only in colder weather. It is not safe to work in hot weather.)
    • “If it is too hot to plant rice, what else might it be too hot to do?” (It is too hot to play; it is too hot to drink hot chocolate.)

B. Partner Role-play and Discussion: Responding to the Text (20 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Offer students specific, positive feedback on how they learned about the weather in three places around the world. (Example: “Everyone looked very closely at the pictures in the text to notice as many details as possible to help understand what the weather is like in each place.”)
  • Tell students that now they will get a chance to help Sofia and Jack pick the proper clothing to ensure that Jack is prepared when he visits Canada, France, and Thailand.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:
    • “I can use details from the text to describe how people prepare for the weather in Alberta, Canada; Paris, France; and central Thailand.”
  • Point out the phrase details from the text and, using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What does the phrase ‘details from the text’ mean?” (It means the words and pictures in a text that help us understand what the text is about.)

  • Display the Sofia paper doll, the Jack paper doll, and the Weather Clothing cards.
  • Invite a student volunteer to help you model the following:
  1. Pick one of the three places studied during the focused read-aloud. (Example: central Thailand)
  2. Examine the Weather Clothing cards, naming each item as you examine it.
  3. Pick the clothing cards that are most appropriate for the weather in the place you chose. (Example: shorts, short-sleeved shirt, sandals)
  4. Consult the Weather around the World anchor chart to find the information about the place you selected.
  5. Use the sentence frame “Jack is in _________. The weather is _________, so I picked _________.” (Example: “Jack is in central Thailand. The weather is hot, so I picked shorts, short-sleeved shirt, and sandals.”)
  6. Pass the Sofia doll and Jack doll to your partner, who will repeat the first five steps using a different location studied during the focused read-aloud.
  • Use a total participation technique and invite responses from the group:

“What did you notice me and my partner do?” (You picked one place. You used the anchor chart to help you remember the information. You picked the clothing that matched the weather in the place. You completed the sentence frame to talk about where Jack visited and what clothing he needed.)

  • Tell students they will now get to do the same with their conversation partner.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to partner up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Ensure that students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Once students have partnered up, invite pairs to pitter-patter like raindrops falling on the ground back to their tables.
  • Once settled, direct students’ attention to the Sofia doll, Jack doll, and Weather Clothing cards at their tables.
  • Briefly review the directions. Remind students of the sentence frame they should use for their discussion.
  • Invite students to begin their discussions.
  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of how they are interacting with one another using the Speaking and Listening Checklist and document progress toward SL.K.1. Redirect students as needed using the Conversation Norms anchor chart.
  • As you and a student volunteer model the partner role-play, highlight critical features of the weather in each place by prompting students to refer to the posted mystery photos. (MMR)
  • As you give directions for the partner role-play, foster collaboration by soliciting strategies for resolving a disagreement. (Example: “When my partner is picking Jack’s clothing, he may pick a weather accessory that I don’t think matches the weather in a certain place. What can I do or say to share my idea and help my partner?”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: For students who need heavier support, encourage them to discuss the same location used for the teacher model. (Example: “This is a difficult task. For today, how about you talk about central Thailand with your partner? Remember how we discussed central Thailand as a class?”)
  • For ELLs: Before students begin working independently, provide additional opportunities to practice using the sentence frame as a class. (Example: “What if I chose Alberta, Canada? Then what would I tell my partner?”)
  • For ELLs: As students work together, record and display the sentence frame that partners will use with one another. Illustrate each part to cue students with the type of response required. (Example: Next to “Jack is in____,” sketch a picture of Jack and the outline of a country with a question mark inside.)

C. Shared Writing: Responding to the Text (10 minutes)

  • Invite students back to the whole group area.
  • Give them specific, positive feedback regarding their conversations. (Example: “I noticed all partners following our agreed-upon conversation norms as they discussed the weather in the different places we studied today.”)
  • Remind students that today they learned about the weather in Alberta, Canada; Paris, France; and central Thailand.
  • Tell students that as partners discussed the clothing they picked for Jack to take on his trip, you heard a lot of great ideas and it’s important to capture those ideas.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Responding to Text: Canada, France, Thailand chart and tell them that, as a class, they are going to write to capture the ideas they gathered from reading the text.
  • Point to the questions at the top of the Responding to Text chart paper and read them aloud:
    • “What is the weather like in this place?”
    • “What do the people wear and do because of the weather?”
  • Tell students they are going to answer these two questions about the three places they studied today.
  • Tell students that they have already done a lot of thinking to answer those questions. Remind them that during the read-aloud they filled in the Weather around the World anchor chart, and during the partner role-play they discussed these ideas with their partners.
  • Use the following procedure to complete the shared writing:
  1. Point to Part I of the Responding to Text chart and read the first sentence aloud:
    • “In Alberta, Canada, the weather is ___________ in March.”
  1. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did we learn the weather was like in Alberta, Canada, in March?” (cold, windy; sometimes there is snow on the ground)

  1. As students share responses, use their ideas to complete the first sentence.
  2. Read the second sentence aloud:
    • “The people have to wear ______________.”
  1. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:
    • *    “What do the people wear in Alberta, Canada, because of the weather?” (hats, coats, gloves, and scarves; some people wear heavy boots)
  1. As students share responses, use their ideas to complete the second sentence.
  2. Read the third sentence aloud:
    • “The people like to ____________.”
  1. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you learn the people in Alberta, Canada, like to do in March?” (They use sleds or skis; they make snowballs; they go outside when they are bundled up; they look at the animals.)

  1. As students share responses, use their ideas to complete the third sentence.
  2. Read the three completed sentences aloud, tracking the print as you do.
  • Repeat Steps 1–10 to complete the shared writing for the remaining two places. Refer to the Responding to Text: Canada, France, Thailand chart (completed, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • If productive, use a Goal 3 Conversation Cue to challenge students:

“Can you figure out why some of the trees in Alberta, Canada, do not have leaves? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (It is still wintertime.)

  • For ELLs and students who need visual support: As you prepare the Place column of the Responding to Text chart, highlight critical features by including a photo to represent each location. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Ask students about the phrases have to and like to. Examples:
    • “What is the difference between have to and like to?” (When you have to do something, you have no choice. When you like to do something, you choose to do it because it makes you happy.)
    •  “What are some things you have to do?” (I have to … go to school; go to bed; brush my teeth.)
    • “What are some things you like to do?” (I like to … play; build with blocks; go swimming.)
    • “What do you have to wear when the weather is cold?” (I have to wear … a warm coat; gloves.)
    • “What do you like to do when the weather is cold?” (I like to … play in the snow; drink hot chocolate.)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Structured Discussion: Reflecting on Responsibility (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Responsibility anchor chart.
  • Tell students they are now going to use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to explain how they showed responsibility during their work today. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Provide a sentence frame:
    • “I showed responsibility in my ______ by ________.”
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to partner up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with their partner:

“How did you show responsibility during your work today?” (Responses will vary, but may include: I showed responsibility in my work by listening closely during the read-aloud; I showed responsibility in my work by taking turns with my partner during the role-play; or I showed responsibility in my work by taking care of the Sofia and Jack dolls during the role-play.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and select a few students to share out with the whole group.
  • Offer students specific positive feedback on showing responsibility. (Example: “I noticed that everyone showed responsibility by taking care of the materials during the partner role-play and discussion today.”)
  • Share with students that in the next lesson, they will read about and discuss the weather in two new places, adding to their knowledge about weather around the world.
  • When you direct students’ attention to the Responsibility anchor chart, embed support for vocabulary by asking students to remind you what responsibility means. If students do not provide an accurate definition, explicitly state it: “Responsibility means taking ownership of my work, my actions, and my space.” (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Before discussing how students showed responsibility with their conversation partners, generate a few ideas with the whole class. Record and display student ideas. Tell students they may use these ideas with their partners if they have trouble thinking of new ideas.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up