Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Focused Read-aloud of Weather and Launching Science Talks | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA GK:M2:U1:L8

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Focused Read-aloud of Weather and Launching Science Talks

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2: With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.1b: Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about the sun using the text Weather (RI.K.1, RI.K.2)
  • I can talk about weather with my classmates. (SL.K.1, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time A, circulate and monitor students’ participation in the Picture Tea Party protocol. Support students in making observations or asking questions about their mystery photo. (SL.K.1)
  • During Work Time A, listen for students to ask and answer questions about the sun using the text Weather (National Geographic Readers). (RI.K.1, RI.K.2)
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to participate in the Science Talk protocol positively by following the guidelines on the Science Talk anchor chart. Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to monitor students’ progress toward SL.K.1, specifically SL.K.1a.
  • During the Closing, listen for students to share a fact about the sun when they turn and talk. (SL.K.1, L.K.6)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Song and Movement: “What’s the Weather like Today?” Song (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Weather, Pages 8–11 (20 minutes)

B. Launching Science Talks: The Sun (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Shared Writing: Sun Fact Page (5 minutes)

B. Interactive Writing: Class Weather Journal (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Work Time A, students participate in a focused read-aloud of an excerpt about the sun from the informational text Weather (National Geographic Readers). Students work to ask and answer questions, identify the main topic, and retell key details about the sun (RI.K.1, RL.K.2). Unlike a close read-aloud, these questions are fewer, are found directly in the body of the lesson, and have a skill-based focus for reading.
  • In Work Time B, students participate in a Science Talk. A Science Talk gives them the opportunity to answer questions about science ideas using a structured discussion format. As students speak and listen about science ideas, they build confidence in their language and discussion skills (SL.K.1, SL.K.1a, L.K.6).
  • During the Closing, the teacher models drawing and writing a sun fact for students. Understanding the idea that a fact is a piece of information about a topic is essential to working toward mastery of W.K.2.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Continue to reinforce routines established in Lesson 1: Picture Tea Party protocol. Refer to the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart as needed to reinforce guidelines.
  • In previous lessons, students experienced an informational text, Weather Words and What They Mean, as a close read-aloud. In this lesson, students are introduced to another informational text about weather, Weather (National Geographic Readers). Exposure to many books about weather helps students to engage with the topic deeply, expand their schema, and build their vocabulary.
  • Students continue to follow the routine of completing the class weather journal as a whole group. Monitoring the local weather daily gives them the opportunity to see patterns emerge in weather.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • During the Picture Tea Party protocol, some students may find it challenging to make observations and/or ask questions about their photo. Consider prompting them by asking a more specific question. (Example: “What do you notice in the sky in this photo?”)
  • During the Science Talk, students may find it difficult to wait for their turn, listen to others, and stay on topic. If needed, refocus whole group and re-model a specific desired behavior that is particularly challenging to students.

Down the road:

  • This is the first lesson in a series of four (Lessons 8–11) in which students participate in a focused read-aloud of an excerpt from Weather (National Geographic Readers) and then participate in a Science Talk about the content from the text. Preview all lessons in this series to fully understand the arc of these four lessons and to see how the learning and skills build from one lesson to the next.
  • In today’s lesson, students are introduced to the Sun Fact Page template, which they will complete independently in Lessons 9–11. In Lesson 12, they will use pictures and words to show a fact about weather.
  • In Lesson 13, students share their learning about weather with a small group and some class visitors. Arrange for a 4-6 visitors to come listen to students share during this lesson. Visitors can be older students, school staff, or community/family members.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Mystery Photos: Sun for use during Work Time A (see supporting materials).
    • Weather talking sticks (see supporting materials).
    • Science Talk anchor chart by writing the steps and adhering the icons on chart paper.
    • Sun Fact Page by creating a replica of the template on chart paper (see supporting materials).
  • Preview the focused read-aloud of the sun excerpt from Weather (National Geographic Readers) to familiarize yourself with the lesson. Review the Picture Tea Party and Science Talk protocols. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.) Additionally, watch the “Science Talk protocol” video to prepare for Work Time A.
  • Post: Learning targets, “What’s the Weather like Today?” song, Science Talk Groups chart, Conversation Partners chart, class weather journal template, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • If students were recorded singing “What’s the Weather like Today?” in previous lessons, consider playing this recording to remind students of the song.
  • If students were recorded during the Picture Tea Party protocol in Lesson 1, consider playing this recording to remind students of the process.
  • Create a slideshow of the Mystery Photos: Sun images.
  • Create the Sun Facts chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.
  • Video-record students participating in the Science Talk protocol to watch and evaluate strengths and areas for improvement or to review in later lessons as a reminder of what happened. Post it on a teacher web page or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to watch at home with families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Complete the Sun Fact Page using a word-processing tool, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.B.5, K.I.B.6, and K.1.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing a structured format and protocol that will support students as they participate in academic conversation.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to participate in the Science Talk protocol independently. If necessary, provide additional opportunities for modeling and supervised practice.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time B, encourage students to use Conversation Cues with classmates to extend and deepen conversations, think with others, and enhance language development.
  • During Closing and Assessment B, consider providing students with personal white boards or their own copies of the class weather journal so they can complete their own writing along with the class. This will allow all students to practice, to remain engaged throughout the activity, and to provide real-time assessment data.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, allow a beginning proficiency student to shadow a mentor student during the first round of the Science Talk. This will provide additional modeling and boost students’ confidence to take risks.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In Work Time B, students share what they did well with their Science Talk group. Provide alternatives for auditory information by scribing students’ responses on chart paper or a white board.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During the Closing, students share facts about the sun with a talking partner. Offer options for students to communicate their ideas by providing small dry erase boards and markers.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): In this lesson, students are introduced to a new tool: a weather talking stick. Minimize distractions by emphasizing that the talking sticks are tools (not toys) for discussion. Facilitate self-regulation by prompting students to generate strategies for using the talking stick respectfully.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T);  Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • warms, living, light (T)
  • fact, Science Talk (L)

Review:

  • heat (T)

Materials

  • “What’s the Weather like Today?” song (from Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Mystery Photos: Sun (one per student)
  • Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Module 1; one to display)
  • Weather (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Sun Facts chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Science Talk Protocol anchor chart (new; teacher created; see supporting materials)
  • Weather talking stick (one for teacher modeling and one per Science Talk group; see Teaching Notes)
  • Weather talking stick icons (for teacher reference)
  • Science Talk Groups chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Sun Fact Page (one for teacher modeling; see Teaching Notes)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Module 1)
  • Class weather journal template (blank; from Lesson 1; one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Song and Movement: “What’s the Weather like Today?” Song (5 minutes)

  • Gather whole group.
  • Remind students that in the previous lessons, they began learning a new song about knowing whether or not they are prepared for the weather.
  • Display the “What’s the Weather like Today?” song and invite students to join you in singing the first four verses.
  • Begin singing, modeling the hand motions as needed. Consider inviting a few students to the front to model the motions for classmates as well.
  • After singing the song with students, reread the first verse aloud again:

“What’s the weather like today?

Can we go outside and play?

In the sky I see sunshine;

It brings weather that feels fine.”

  • Share that today students will learn more about one important component of the weather: the sun!
  • Invite students to make their bodies show what the sun does by opening their arms like rays of sunshine.
  • After students open their arms like rays of sunshine, contextualize discussion in students’ experiences. Ask: “Have you ever seen the sun rise or set? Turn to your partner and share the colors you saw in the sky when the sun was rising or setting.” (MME)
  • For ELLs: Discuss the figurative language in the first verse. Example: “Does the sun really bring weather that feels fine?” (No, it is a way of saying that when the sun is out, nice weather happens.)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Weather, Pages 8–11 (20 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to use the Picture Tea Party protocol to view Mystery Photos: Sun. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 1 and review as necessary using the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol using the anchor chart.
  • Invite students back to the whole group area and collect the mystery photos.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Based on the images you saw in the mystery photos, what do you think we will learn about today?” (the sun)

  • Confirm that today students will learn about the sun.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • “I can ask and answer questions about the sun using the text Weather.”
  • Above the posted learning target, draw several simple icons to illustrate the meaning: a question mark over the word questions, a sun over the word sun and a book over the word text.
  • Explain that these pictures show what students will do today.
  • Reread the target, emphasizing the words with an icon above them:
    • “I can ask and answer questions about the sun using the text Weather (National Geographic Readers).”
  • Display the cover of Weather, draw students’ attention to the title of the book, and read it aloud.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Sun Facts chart. Share that as students hear information about the sun read aloud, they will record important facts about the sun on this chart.
  • Define fact (something said or known to be true).
  • While displaying pages 8–9 of the text, read them aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Define warms (to make warm; to heat).
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What does the sun warm?” (the land, the air, and the water)

“So if we know this information, then what does the sun do?” (The sun warms the land, air, and water.)

  • Emphasize that this is an important fact about the sun and record it on the Sun Facts chart.
  • While still displaying the text, read the first sentence of page 9 aloud.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What kinds of things grow?” (plants, animals, babies, people)

  • Explain that living things grow. Define living (having life). Animals and plants are both living things.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“How does the sun help things to grow?” (The sun gives heat and light; the sun shines on living things.)

  • Review the definition of heat and define light (the form of energy that makes it possible for the eye to see).
  • Explain that giving heat and light is an important part of what the sun does for living things.
  • As students share, clarify and capture a few facts on the Sun Facts chart. (Examples: Heat and light help things grow; sunshine helps plants and animals live.)
  • Display pages 10–11 of the text. Read page 10 aloud fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What does the text say that people like to do on sunny days?” (play outside, go to the park, ride a bike, go swimming)

  • Share with students that now they will pretend to do one of the things that people like to do on sunny days.
  • Invite students to quietly and safely stand up in their spot.
  • Review the sunny day activities from the text on page 10: play outside, go to the park, ride a bike, go swimming.
  • Choose one student to select an activity from page 10 and model acting it out. (Example: move arms like swimming in the pool)
  • Invite all students to choose one activity and then act it out in their space.
  • After 15–20 seconds, refocus whole group
  • Before you read, support students in organizing information by encouraging them to discuss a question they already have about the sun through a Think-Pair-Share. Write some of students’ initial questions on chart paper or a white board. Tell students that as you read the book, they can see if their question is answered. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: During or after Work Time A, consider completing or returning to the Language Dive conversation introduced in Lesson 7. Use structures from the Language Dive to discuss the sun. (Example: “The sun is light that warms the earth.”)

B. Launching Science Talks: The Sun (25 minutes)

  • Invite students to move safely to a spot on the edge of the whole group meeting area.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:
    • “I can talk about weather with my classmates.”
  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target.
  • Explain that talking about a science question with your classmates can help you to learn more about science. This is called a Science Talk.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Science Talk Protocol anchor chart and read aloud each bullet, pointing to each word and image:
    • “Sit with your Science Talk group.”
    • “Take turns. Listen when others are speaking.”
    • “Talk about the question.”
  • Tell students that today they will talk to their classmates about several weather questions. Read the questions aloud:

“What do you like to do when it is sunny outside?”

“What do you like to do when it is rainy outside?”

“Do you prefer sunny or rainy weather?”

  • Introduce the weather talking stick and explain that the person holding the weather talking stick is the person who can talk. This helps group members take turns. Refer to the weather talking stick icons as necessary (for teacher reference).
  • Invite two students to the center of the whole group meeting area to model a science talk. The talk should include the teacher and two students.
  • Before modeling, invite students to notice what you say and do during the Science Talk.
  • Model these steps:
  1. All Science Talk group members sit facing one another.
  2. The group member (in this case, the teacher) who has the weather talking stick answers the question first.
  3. That member passes the weather talking stick to the next member (one of the two students).
  4. Repeat until all members have answered the question.
  5. Continue passing the weather talking stick around the circle until you hear the designated chime or signal from the teacher.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you notice the Science Talk group members say and do?” (take turns, hold the weather talking stick to talk, pass the weather talking stick around the circle, answer the question, talk about the question)

  • As needed, guide students to notice the behaviors listed on the Science Talk Protocol anchor chart.
  • Split students into their Science Talk groups using the Science Talk Groups chart.
  • Invite students to move to sit in a circle with their group. Distribute weather talking sticks.
  • Refocus whole group. Post and read aloud the first question:

“What do you like to do when it is sunny outside?” (go outside, play a sport, play at the park, go swimming, ride a scooter or bike)

  • Post and read aloud an applicable sentence stem:
    • “When it is sunny outside, I like to _______.”
  • Remind students to:
    • Take turns and listen when others are speaking.
    • Talk about the question.
  • Invite the students with the weather talking stick to begin use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track their progress toward SL.K.1a.
  • As you introduce and model the weather talking stick, minimize distractions by emphasizing that talking sticks are tools (not toys) for discussion. Facilitate self-regulation by prompting students to generate strategies for using the talking stick respectfully. Example: “When I am holding the talking stick, I might be tempted to wave it in the air. What can I do to remember I should use the stick as a tool, not a toy?” (take a deep breath, squeeze the talking stick with two hands, look at the Science Talk anchor chart) (MME)
  • As students share what they did well with their Science Talk group, provide alternatives for auditory information by scribing students’ responses on chart paper or a white board. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Create groups with varying levels of language proficiency. The students with greater language proficiency can serve as models in the group, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames. If possible, consider grouping students who speak the same home language to help one another interpret and comprehend the conversation in their home language.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Shared Writing: Sun Fact Page (5 minutes)

  • Introduce the posted Sun Fact Page. Tell students that this page is a place where they can teach their reader a fact about the sun using pictures and words.
  • Reinforce that a fact is something said or known to be true.
  • Prompt students to notice that they have learned many new facts about the sun today. Refer to the Sun Facts chart and Weather text to reinforce as needed.
  • Refer to the Conversation Partners chart. Invite students to partner up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner:

“What fact did you learn about the sun today?” (It gives heat and light; it shines to help living things.)

  • Provide a sentence stem:
    • “Today I learned that the sun __________.”
  • As students discuss, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and target a few students to share out whole group.
  • Refocus students whole group and call on the selected students to share out.
  • Direct students’ attention back to Sun Fact Page.
    • Point to the picture box and tell students that a picture can be drawn here.
    • Point to the words box/line and tell students that words can be written here.
    • Model completing the Sun Fact Page:
  1. Think aloud about a sun fact. (Example: “I remember that the sun shines to help plants grow.”)
  2. Draw a picture to show the fact. (Example: a flower growing in a yard with a sun shining in the sky)
  3. Write a sentence to tell the fact. (Example: The sun shines to help plants grow.)
  • Preview tomorrow’s work by telling students that soon they will create their own fact pages.
  • Interactive Writing: Class Weather Journal (5 minutes)

B. Interactive Writing: Class Weather Journal (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to today’s class weather journal template and remind them that they will report on the daily weather just like meteorologists do. Remind students that meteorologists observe the outside conditions and use that information to create weather reports.
  • Follow the Interactive Writing: Class Weather Journal instructional practice from Lesson 5 to complete Parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the class weather journal template.
  • Direct students’ attention to the top of the weather journal template and invite a student to come to the front and read the completed weather journal aloud to the class, as a meteorologist would do.
  • Before students share with their conversation partner, offer options for students to communicate their ideas by providing small dry erase boards and markers. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Invite beginning and intermediate proficiency students to take risks and build confidence by providing opportunities for them to participate more heavily in the shared and interactive writing experiences.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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