You are here

ELA GK:M2:U1:L7

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud, Session 6 and Culminating Task

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2: With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.K.4: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about wind using Weather Words and What They Mean. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, RI.K.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the close read-aloud in Work Time A, use the Reading Informational Text Checklist to track students’ progress toward RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Collect student response sheets for the culminating task during Work Time C to serve as evidence of progress toward standards RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4 and to inform instruction for subsequent lessons.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Song and Movement: “What’s the Weather like Today?” Song (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 6: Weather Words and What They Mean, Pages 26–27 (15 minutes)

B. Language Dive: Weather Words and What They Mean (10 minutes)

C. Close Read-aloud Culminating Task: Naming and Describing Weather Components (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Reflecting on Responsibility (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students continue to cultivate their curiosity and build their knowledge of the components that make weather. This lesson invites students to ask and answer questions about details and unknown words in the text regarding wind as they seek to clarify their understanding, connect with prior knowledge, and wonder about the components that make weather (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4).
  • During Work Time A, students finish their close read of the unit’s anchor text: Weather Words and What They Mean. In Session 6, students add to their understanding of weather by reading and answering questions about a component of weather: wind (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4).
  • During Work Time B, students participate in a Language Dive conversation that guides them through the meaning of a sentence from Weather Words and What They Mean. The conversation invites students to unpack complex syntax—or “academic phrases”—as a necessary component of building both literacy and habits of mind. Students can then apply their understanding of this structure as they complete future writing and speaking tasks. A consistent Language Dive routine is critical in helping all students learn how to decipher complex sentences and write their own. In addition, Language Dive conversations may hasten overall English language development for ELLs.
  • Consider providing a movement break after the before or after Work Time B to help students maintain focus. For example, playing a few quick rounds of “When the Cold Wind Blows.” Instructions for play can be found here.
  • In the culminating task during Work Time C, students synthesize the understanding they have gained from closely reading about the components that make weather (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4).

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 2–6, students listened to and answered questions about sections of the text Weather Words and What They Mean. Now, in this last session of the close read-aloud, students closely study a final section of the text and complete a culminating task, during which they draw and write to synthesize their knowledge of the three components of weather they studied during Lessons 2–6.
  • Throughout the unit, students have been reflecting on how they show responsibility. During the Closing of this lesson, students engage in a more in-depth reflection using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Some students may need additional time to complete the culminating task.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 8, students are introduced to a new book, Weather: National Geographic Reader. In Lessons 8–12, students complete focused read-alouds, answering text-dependent questions after hearing the text read aloud.

In Advance

  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide: Weather Words and What They Mean to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students. Note that the Close Read-aloud Guide is divided into sessions. Complete only Session 6 in this lesson.
  • Prepare:
    • Weather Word Wall card for wind. Write or type the word on a card and create or find a visual to accompany it.
    • Frayer Model: Wind chart by creating a blank version on chart paper. See Close Read-aloud Guide.
    • Language Chunk Wall for use during the Language Dive included with this lesson and during all subsequent whole-class and optional Language Dives. Students are invited to place sentence strip chunks into corresponding language categories. For this lesson, the categories nouns and noun phrases, adjectives, verbs and verb phrases, and language to talk about location or direction suggested; create alternative or additional categories according to students’ needs. Distribute student materials for Work Time B at students’ seats in the whole group area. This helps to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Review the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning target, “What’s the Weather like Today?” song, Frayer Model: Wind chart, Frayer Model: Temperature chart, Frayer Model: Moisture chart, class weather journal template, Conversation Partners chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).
  • Preview the Language Dive Guide and consider how to invite conversation among students to address the questions and goals suggested under each sentence strip chunk (see supporting materials). Select from the questions and goals provided to best meet your students' needs.
  • Consider providing students with a Language Dive log inside a folder to track Language Dive sentences and structures and collate Language Dive note-catchers.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • If students were recorded singing “What’s the Weather like Today?” in previous lessons, consider playing this recording to remind students of the song.
  • Record the whole group singing the fifth and final verse of “What’s the Weather like Today?” and post it on a teacher web page or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to listen to at home with their families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Create the Frayer Model: Wind chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.
  • Students view wind pictures in an online gallery or presentation, such as Google Slides.
  • Students complete the Culminating Task response sheet using word-processing software, such as Google Docs.
  • Students use speech-t0-text facilities activated on devices or use an app or software like Dragon Dictation.
  • Record students as they participate in the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to watch later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standard K.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to synthesize their learning about weather as they begin their culminating task.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to comprehend some of the academic vocabulary and phrases found in the close read-aloud text. Reinforce the meaning of the vocabulary and academic language during the Language Dive conversation in Work Time B.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • During the Language Dive conversation, extend student work by challenging them to add more detail to their sentences about weather facts by using the relative pronoun that. See the Language Dive Guide for details.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time C, distribute a partially filled-in copy of the Culminating Task response sheet. This will provide students with prompting for the information they should draw while reducing the volume of work required. (Example: Label each box to provide students with prompts for what they should begin to draw.)

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the Closing, students revisit the term responsibility. Embed support for new vocabulary by asking students to remind you what responsibility means. If they do not provide an accurate definition, explicitly state it: “Responsibility means taking ownership of my work, my actions, and my space.”
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): In Work Time C, students need to draw and label their ideas in the culminating task. To support this process, offer options for drawing utensils, writing tools, and scaffolds.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Students are introduced to the word wind in the close read-aloud session. After placing the word on the Weather Word Wall, provide options for physical action and foster community by playing a few quick rounds of “When the Cold Wind Blows.” Instructions for play can be found here.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • wind

Materials

  • “What’s the Weather like Today?” song (from Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Weather Word Wall card (new; teacher-created; one)
  • Weather Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1, added to during Work Time A; see Teaching Notes)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Weather Words and What They Mean (Session 6; for teacher reference)
    • Weather Words and What They Mean (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Reading Informational Text Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
    • Frayer Model: Wind chart (new, co-created with students during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
    • Wind pictures (four)
  • Language Dive Guide (for teacher reference)
    • Sentence strip chunks (one to display)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Module 1)
  • Culminating Task response sheet (one per student; see Close Read-aloud Guide)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Crayons (class set; variety of colors per student)
  • Frayer Model: Temperature chart (from Lesson 4; one to display)
  • Frayer Model: Moisture chart (from Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Sofia paper doll (from Lesson 4; one to display)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart (begun in Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Song and Movement: “What’s the Weather like Today?” Song (5 minutes)

  • Gather whole group.
  • Remind students that in the previous lessons, they began learning a new song about knowing whether or not they are prepared for the weather.
  • Display the “What’s the Weather like Today?” song and invite students to join you in singing the first four verses.
  • Invite students to follow along as you track the print and sing the fifth and final verse of the song.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What are some hand gestures and actions that might help us remember this verse?” (looking out the window, shrugging our shoulders, and making our hands look like raindrops falling to the ground)

  • Invite students to join you to sing the entire song and use their chosen hand gestures and actions.
  • Repeat two or three times or as time permits.
  • For ELLs: Identify students who might be mouthing the words or not singing while the class sings chorally. If students seem to be avoiding singing, encourage them to sing without pressuring them. If students are comfortable, invite them to sing “duets” with more confident students so they can more easily hear themselves as they practice.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 6: Weather Words and What They Mean, Pages 26–27 (15 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Display Weather Words and What They Mean and tell students that they will read another section of the text today.
  • Briefly review the three components of weather, temperature, moisture, air pressure, that students have learned about and explain that today students will learn about the fourth component of weather, wind, as they read the text.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning target and read it aloud:
    • “I can ask and answer questions about wind using Weather Words and What They Mean.”
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the learning target.
  • Show students the Weather Word Wall card for wind.
  • Read the word, point to the picture icon, and explain that wind is air that moves over the surface of the earth.
  • Invite students to turn to a partner and ask:

“Can you think of and describe a time that you experienced wind or remember a windy day you have experienced?” (Student responses will vary.)

  • Explain that as students read Weather Words and What They Mean today, they will learn more about different types of wind.
  • Place the Word Wall card and picture for wind on the Weather Word Wall.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud of Weather Words and What They Mean using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Weather Words and What They Mean (Session 6; for teacher reference). Consider using the Reading Informational Text Checklist during the close read-aloud (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Refer to the guide for the use of the Frayer Model: Wind and wind pictures.
  • After placing wind on the Weather Word Wall, provide options for physical action and foster community by playing a few quick rounds of “When the Cold Wind Blows.” Instructions for play can be found here. (MMAE, MME)

B. Language Dive: Weather Words and What They Mean (10 minutes)

  • Tell students they will now participate in a Language Dive.
  • Use the Language Dive Guide: Weather Words and What They Mean to guide students through a Language Dive of the sentence. Display the sentence strip chunks.

C. Close Read-aloud Culminating Task: Naming and Describing Weather Components (20 minutes)

  • Tell students they will now write and draw about the three components of weather they have learned about while reading Weather Words and What They Mean.
  • Using a total participation technique invite responses from the group:

“What are the three components of weather we read about in the text?” (temperature, moisture, wind)

  • Tell students they are going to use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to discuss what they learned about those three components of weather. Review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to partner up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

“What did this book teach you about what makes the weather? What did you learn about what these three components are and how they make the weather?” (Responses will vary.)

  • If productive, cue students to listen carefully and seek to understand:

“Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after both partners have shared.
  • Gather students whole group and invite volunteers to share out.
  • Tell students that now they will return to their tables to draw and write about what they just discussed.
  • Invite students to blow like the wind back to their tables.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Culminating Task response sheet, pencils, and crayons at their tables.
  • Tell students that now they will draw and write about the three components of weather that they just finished talking about with their conversation partner. Review the directions for the task with students:
  1. Write the name of one of the components that make weather in each of the boxes.
  2. Draw a picture that shows something you learned about that component below the name of the component.
  3. Label your pictures
  • Remind students to use classroom resources such as the Frayer Model: Temperature chart, Frayer Model: Moisture chart, Frayer Model: Wind chart, and Weather Word Wall to help them as they write and draw.
  • Invite students to begin writing, drawing, and labeling.
  • Circulate to support students as necessary.
  • To help students express their ideas in the culminating task, offer options for drawing utensils (e.g., thick markers, colored pencils), writing tools (e.g., fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards), and scaffolds (e.g., picture cues, shared writing, extended time). (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with strategy development: Before students begin drawing and writing independently, briefly model completing one of the boxes. Model and think aloud using the Frayer Model charts to help guide the work. (Examples: “Hmm. I see that Frayer Model: Moisture chart has snow, so I am going to make snow.”) (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Recall sentence structures from Language Dives and Mini Language Dives to support student thinking and discussion. Examples:
    • “Moisture is water that ______.”
    • “Rain forms when ______.”

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Reflecting on Responsibility (10 minutes)

  • Gather students back together and give them specific, positive feedback regarding their drawing and writing. (Example: “I noticed that everyone added labels to their drawings of the components of weather.”)
  • Display the Sofia paper doll. Remind students that they have been working hard to learn about the weather to help Sofia become more prepared for all types of weather.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to reflect on how they have shown responsibility during various parts of the unit so far and to tell Sofia how they are helping her be more prepared for all types of weather. Remind them that they used this protocol in Module 1 and review as necessary using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol using the following questions:

“How did you show responsibility during our interactive experiences?” (Responses will vary, but may include: I took care of materials; I moved safely through our space; I observed closely so my drawings would have a lot of details.)

“How have you shown responsibility for helping Sofia learn about the weather and how to be prepared for the weather?” (Responses will vary, but may include: I have learned a lot about what makes different types of weather.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and target a few students to share out whole group.
  • Refocus students and call on the selected students to share out.
  • As students share, pass around the Sofia paper doll so they can share their answers directly with her.
  • If using the Responsibility anchor chart, embed support for vocabulary by asking students to remind you what responsibility means. If they do not provide an accurate definition, explicitly state it: “Responsibility means taking ownership of my work, my actions, and my space.” (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with organizing their thinking for verbal expression: When circulating and listening in during the Think-Pair-Share, scaffold partner conversations as needed. Some students may benefit from explicit prompting or a sentence frame. Examples:
    • “I took care of materials such as _____ and ______.”
    • “I have taken responsibility for learning about the weather by _____.” (MMAE)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up