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ELA GK:M1:U3:L2

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 2 and Exploring Photos

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.4: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts)
  • SL.K.3: Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • L.K.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.K.1d: Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
  • L.K.1f: Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can describe what Grandma teaches Molly Lou about toys using details in the text. (RL.K.1, RL.K.4, RL.K.7)
  • I can ask a question to learn about my classmate. (SL.K.3, L.K.1d)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time A, listen for students to describe what Grandma teaches Molly Lou using details in the text (RL.K.1).
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to use the guessing game sentence frame to name and describe photos of toys from long ago (SL.K.3).
  • During the Closing, students turn and talk to a classmate to practice the skill of asking a question. Monitor students as they ask a question and listen to their partner’s response. Also, listen for students to share their partner’s idea with the whole group. Direct students to the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart as needed and consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to monitor progress (SL.K.3).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Song and Movement: “Toys from Long Ago” Song (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud Session 2: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon, Pages 1–8 (20 minutes)

B. Noticing and Wondering: Toys Long Ago Guessing Game (20 minutes)

C. Reading Aloud: Playing with Friends (10 minutes)

3.      Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students continue their close read of the unit’s anchor text: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon. In Session 2, students work to ask and answer questions about key details and unknown words and describe the relationship between illustrations and the story (RL.K.1, RL.K.4 and RL.K.7).
  • In this lesson, students explore the idea of others’ preferences through literature, informational text, and exploratory games using photos of toys long ago. This supports young learners with multiple and varied experiences related to perspectives and preferences to support understanding of these concepts. The playful, hands-on experiences in this lesson encourage engagement in the topic and use of descriptive language skills (D2.Civ.10.K-2, SL.K.4).
  • Students continue to use the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart as a support for developing the skills of asking and answering questions. Anchor charts such as this one support students’ participation in high-level cognitive tasks by giving them clear, concrete directions of what to do. As students become more confident, they will be asked to generate their own questions as well as ask follow-up questions to gather more information (SL.K.3, SL.K.4).
  • This lesson is the second in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 2, Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O’Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012.  Based on Chapin, S., O’Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K–6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). Goal 2, Conversation Cues encourage students to listen carefully to one another and seek to understand. Continue drawing on Goal 1, Conversation Cues, introduced in Unit 1, Lesson 3, and add Goal 2, Conversation Cues to more strategically promote productive and equitable conversation. As the modules progress, Goal 3, and 4, Conversation Cues are also introduced. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 1, students were introduced to the unit guiding question: “What toys do others prefer?” and the Letter from the Principal, which presented the primary work for this unit. In this lesson, students begin to explore toys from long ago in greater depth.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Look for opportunities to support students as they name and describe photos of toys from long ago in the guessing game during Work Time B. Students who lack descriptive language and syntax skills will need additional support. Consider placing the Toys and Play Word Wall and guessing game sentence frames in an area of the classroom where students can easily reference them.

Down the road:

  • During Work Time B, students hear the text Playing with Friends read aloud. This text will be read aloud three times, in Lessons 2–4. The first read-aloud focuses on general understanding, the second focuses on similarities between toys now and long ago, and the third focuses on differences between toys now and long ago.
  • In this lesson, students ask a classmate a question and report the classmate’s answer to the whole group in the Closing. This activity allows students to practice the skill of asking a question, which scaffolds them toward interviewing a classmate in the unit assessment in Lessons 9–10.
  • In Lesson 6, students will use masking tape and recycled materials to create a toy. If students have not used masking tape before, consider providing a time to practice using masking tape to adhere items together, to prepare for the work of Lesson 6.

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display the “Toys from Long Ago” song and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • The “Toys from Long Ago” song references toys that grandparents played with. If possible, invite students to ask an older adult or grandparent, “What toys did you play with when you were little?” and report their findings to the class.
  • Preview:
    • Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (Session 2; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students. Note that the Close Read-aloud Guide is broken into sessions. Complete only Session 2, in this lesson; students will complete the remaining sessions in Lessons 3–7.
    • Playing with Friends to familiarize yourself with the text before reading it aloud to students.
  • Strategically pair students for partner work during Work Time B.
  • Designate classroom areas where students can work in pairs to play the Toys Long Ago guessing game during Work Time B. Set out sets of photos of toys from long ago in those work areas.
  • Cut out the photos of toys from long ago and create sets of photos for pairs to use. There should be two photos in each set. If the toys shown in the toy photos do not adequately represent your students’ backgrounds, consider using other photos or asking families to support the class’s work by sending in photos of toys that older family members played with.
  • Post: Learning targets, “Learning Target” poem, “Toys from Long Ago” song, guessing game sentence frames, and Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: Record the whole group singing verse 1, of the “Toys from Long Ago” song and post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to listen to at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Record students as they discuss in pairs, to listen to later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.B.5, K.I.B.6, K.I.C.12, and K.II.B.5

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the use of graphic organizers and through opportunities to use verbal language in a structured way.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to transition throughout the lesson and to comprehend each cumulative step toward expressing their own preferences and asking about a classmate’s preference. Throughout the lesson, prime students to choose their preferences by pausing for a moment to ask the class to choose one of two preferences. (Example: “Raise your hand if you would prefer to be partner A. Now raise your hand if you would prefer to be partner B.”)
  • It may be challenging for students to use language to describe different kinds of toys, especially if the toys are unfamiliar. Display visual aids where students can see them throughout the lesson. Encourage them to describe toys through pantomiming and/or speaking in their home languages to scaffold using English.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time B, invite students to suggest their own guessing game sentence frames. Write and display students’ ideas on or near the original guessing game sentence frames.

For heavier support:

  • Before each step of the lesson, perform key activities with familiar content first. (Example: Before playing a guessing game about toys from long ago, practice playing a guessing game about toys considered in previous lessons, such as building blocks.)
  • Remind students that long ago means a time when their grandparents were children. To reinforce this concept, consider showing a short movie or displaying some photographs depicting scenes from the past.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, information is conveyed through multiple formats such as song, text, and visuals. Make use of multiple flexible formats in each component of the lesson. In particular, offer customized displays of information on the guessing game sentence frames for student reference during the activity.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): At the end of this lesson, students will indicate which type of toy from long ago that they prefer. Offer alternatives for conveying their preference other than speaking, such as pointing to an image or writing/drawing their preference. In addition, minimize threats to students in partner work by acknowledging that students may disagree on which toy they prefer and that your classroom is accepting of everyone’s personal opinions.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): This lesson builds on the previous lesson and the close reading of Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon. Facilitate comprehension by drawing connections to the story from the previous lesson. Particularly, prompt students to recall the characters and setting as well as differences between toys from today and those from long ago. This lesson offers several opportunities for students to engage in partner work. Think strategically about partnerships, so that peers can serve as differentiated mentors. Offer visual and physical reminders for partnership protocols, to minimize distractions during the partner discussion.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • classmates (L)

Review:

  • describe, prefer, details, question (L)

Materials

  • Document camera (optional)
  • “Toys from Long Ago” song (verse 1; one to display; see supporting materials)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (from Lesson 1; Session 2; for teacher reference)
  • Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Grandma Teaches Molly Lou anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1; added to in Work Time A; see Close Read-aloud Guide)
  • Photo of a toy from long ago (from Lesson 1; one for teacher modeling)
  • Guessing game sentence frames (several to display; see supporting materials)
  • Shape Words anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 3)
  • Photos of toys from long ago (from Lesson 1; one set per student; see Teaching Notes)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1)
  • Playing with Friends (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Conversation Partner chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Song and Movement: “Toys from Long Ago” Song (5 minutes)

  • Using a document camera, display the “Toys from Long Ago” song and model singing verse 1, aloud for students, pointing to each word as you sing.
  • Sing the song a second time, inviting students to join in.
  • Explain that there are many toys from long ago in this song, and some are the same toys as the toy photos students sorted in Lesson 1.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What names of toys from long ago did you hear in the song?” (ball, doll, house, top, jacks, mouse)

  • As toys are named, invite students to show a thumbs-up or put their hands on their head if they have heard of this toy before.
  • Sing or read the first two lines of the song again.
  • Explain that grandparents grew up a long time ago and sometimes played with different toys than children play with now.
  • Explain that the students will learn more about Molly Lou Melon’s grandmother today by learning about the toys she played with.
  • Offer alternatives for auditory information by providing visual notations of music or sound and use facial expressions or hand gestures to convey the emotional interpretation of the song. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Provide options for comprehension by activating students’ prior knowledge about the book based on the previous lesson. (Example: “Name the types of toys you remember Molly Lou’s Grandma playing with.”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Annotate the song with illustrations based on the lyrics. (Example: Draw or paste a photograph of a small picture of a mouse next to the word mouse.)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud Session 2: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon, Pages 1–8 (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can describe what Grandma teaches Molly Lou about toys using details in the text.”

  • Review the definition of describe (to tell or write about) and details (a small item; a particular thing). Say:

“So this target means that students will look closely in the text to describe what Grandma teaches Molly Lou about toys.”

  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (Session 2; for teacher reference)
  • Refer to the guide for the use of the Grandma Teaches Molly Lou anchor chart.
  • For ELLs: When introducing the definitions for describe and details, clarify new vocabulary with graphic symbols. (Examples: a picture of someone talking and pointing to an object for describe or a picture of an object with arrows pointing to the details) (MMR)
  • Highlight previously learned skills by referring back to the key story elements from Lesson 1: characters and setting. Use the same chart or visual representation from the previous lesson to build on reading routines. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Invite at least one beginner ELL to the board among the students who act out pages 1–4. This will allow them to connect to the meaning of the text through movement.

B. Noticing and Wondering: Toys Long Ago Guessing Game (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can ask a question to learn about my classmate.”

  • Explain that today, students will learn about their classmates by asking a partner a question. Define classmates (people in the same class at school).
  • Briefly review the definition of question (a sentence that asks for an answer).
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target.
  • Explain that later in the lesson, students will ask their partner this question:

“Which toy from long ago would you prefer to play with?”

  • Tell students that two activities will help them to learn more about toys from long ago: playing a game and reading a text. First, the class will play a game!
  • Show students a photo of a toy from long ago.
  • Invite students to look closely at the photo.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice about this toy?” (It has wheels. It looks like a scooter. You can drive it.)

  • Explain that the students will play a guessing game to guess what the toy is called and how children might have played with it.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted guessing game sentence frames.
  • Holding up the photo of a toy from long ago, model using the guessing game sentence frames. Say:

“This toy has lots of little pieces that are shaped like x’s and one ball. I think you might play with them by putting the pieces on the floor and bouncing the ball. My guess is that it is a game.”

  • Refer to the Shape Words anchor chart if needed.
  • Model pretending to play with the toy. Encourage students to mime how they might play with it to help make their guess.
  • Explain that students will work with a partner to use the guessing game sentence frames with photos of toys from long ago to learn more about the toys.
  • Move students into predetermined pairs and designate one student as partner A and one as partner B.
  • Call pairs of students to move safely to a designated area where photos of toys from long ago have been placed.
  • Post the following directions for the guessing game and read them aloud to students. Answer clarifying questions.

1. Sit across from your partner.

2. Place a photo of a toy from long ago on your lap. Do not let your partner see your photo yet.

3. Looks closely at your photo of a toy from long ago.

4. Listen as the teacher reads the guessing game sentence frames aloud.

5. Use all three guessing game sentence frames to describe your photo to your partner. Show your photo to your partner now.

6. Repeat the guessing game with partner B, using his/her photo.

  • Invite students to begin the guessing game.
  • As students play, circulate and listen to students’ descriptions and guesses. As needed, prompt and remodel using the guessing game sentence frames and the Toys and Play Word Wall as a reference for toy action words. Also, consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1).
  • Refocus whole group, signaling all students to stop through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle.
  • Instruct students to bring their photo of a toy from long ago with them and walk safely to the whole group gathering area.
  • Collect students’ photos.
  • When introducing the definition of question, provide options for language by clarifying new vocabulary with graphic symbols. (Examples: a picture of a student asking someone a question or a large question mark, etc.) (MMR)
  • As students share what they notice about the toy, help guide their information processing by identifying the specific details they use to describe the toy. This also helps to model appropriate usage of new vocabulary in context. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: If some students have difficultly reading or recalling the guessing game sentence frames, offer flexible formats to convey the set of questions (e.g., a picture of eyes for what it looks like, a picture of a child playing for how a child might play with it, and a picture of a person holding his hand up to the ear for what it is called). (MMR)
  • Provide differentiated mentors by purposefully pre-selecting student partnerships in which students who struggle can have peer support. You may need to coach the mentors to engage with their partners and share their thought processes. This can be done during questioning as you circulate the room. (MME)
  • Minimize potential distractions by asking students to physically indicate whether they are an A or a B (e.g., raising hand, giving a thumbs -up, etc.). This way, students get an extra reminder, so that they can focus on the conversation when they engage with their partner. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Simplify the sentence frames if students have difficulty verbalizing the guessing game sentence frames. Prompt students by asking: “What is this?” If it would help express their ideas, prompt students to use their home languages. (Example: “What is this? This is a ________.”

C. Reading Aloud: Playing with Friends (10 minutes)

  • Prompt students to consider the question from earlier in the lesson:

“What toy from long ago would you prefer to play with?”

  • Tell students to keep their ideas in their minds for now, because they will learn more about toys long ago by hearing a new text read aloud.
  • Using a document camera, display Playing with Friends and read the title aloud slowly.
  • Explain that this text will teach students about toys and play long ago and now.
  • Tell students you will now read the text aloud. As you do, they should look and listen closely to notice any toys in the text that they have seen or heard about before in the photos of toys now and long ago or in the “Toys from Long Ago” song. Consider inviting students to quietly show a thumbs-up or touch their nose whenever they see or hear about a familiar toy.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 4–22 aloud fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What toys from long ago did you notice in this text?” (carousel horse, ball and bat, jump rope, marbles, radio, wooden toys)

  • Consider making a list on chart paper or on the board to aid students’ memory. Guide them toward identifying several toys from long ago if needed.
  • For ELLs: Clarify the meaning of the word prefer by connecting it to their prior vocabulary knowledge, such as “favorite” or “best of all.” (MMR)
  • For ELLs: As you make the list on chart paper or a whiteboard, consider pasting cut-out pictures of the toys in addition to text to provide varied formats of representation. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Point out that the same action words (verbs) are used on each pair of pages, but the tenses are different. Prompt students to notice that some of the verbs have an -ed at the end and some sound different. Briefly review the meaning of each verb: like to, play, move, be made of, watch, listen, have fun.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Remind students that they participated in two activities today that taught them more about toys from long ago: playing the guessing game and listening to Playing with Friends.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart and review it briefly.
  • Tell students they are going to turn and talk about a question from earlier in the lesson. Model briefly, what this turn and talk should look like with a student volunteer:

1. Assign yourself as partner A and the student volunteer as partner B.

2. Ask the student volunteer:

“Which toy from long ago would you prefer to play with?”

3. Listen as the student volunteer shares an answer. If needed, guide the student to name a toy from the photos of toys from long ago or from Playing with Friends.

4. Invite the student volunteer to ask you the same question.

5. Model a response. (Example: “I would prefer to play with marbles.”)

  • For additional modeling, invite two students to Fishbowl the interaction.
  • Tell students that it is their turn to ask a partner the same question.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partner chart, invite students to pair up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing each other. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner:

“Which toy from long ago would you prefer to play with?” (Responses will vary.)

  • As students share, circulate and listen in. Notice whether they are able to ask the question and listen to their partner’s response.
  • If productive, use a Goal 2, Conversation Cue to encourage students to listen carefully:

“Who can repeat what your classmate said?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Refocus whole group. Give students specific, positive feedback on asking questions to learn more. (Example: “I noticed you listened carefully as your partners shared their responses.”)
  • Before beginning the conversation, supply background knowledge by having students answer a question anchored in their own life experience to help them grasp the meaning of prefer. Ask a question such as: “Do you prefer pizza or hot dogs?” Ensure that the question is culturally relevant to your classroom demographics. (MME)
  • Minimize potential distractions by asking students to physically indicate whether they are an A or a B (e.g., raising hand, giving a thumbs-up, etc.). This way, students get an extra reminder, so that they can focus on the conversation when they engage with their partner. (MME)
  • Minimize potential threats to students by emphasizing that there are no right or wrong responses in this activity. Instead, students just need to be able to explain why they prefer one toy over the other. Promote an accepting and supportive classroom climate by explaining that some students might disagree on which toy they prefer, and that is okay. (MME, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: To vary the methods of response, provide alternatives means for conveying student responses, such as pointing to the type of toy they prefer or writing/drawing it on a piece of paper. (MMAE)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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