Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 1 and Sorting Photos | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA GK:M1:U3:L1

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 1 and Sorting Photos

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.3: With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
  • L.K.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.K.1d: Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
  • L.K.5: With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
  • L.K.5a: Sort common objects into categories (e.g., shapes, foods) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can identify the characters and setting in a story that is read to me. (RL.K.1, RL.K.3)
  • I can sort toys into groups of toys now and toys from long ago. (L.K.5a)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time A, monitor students’ general understanding of the text Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon by listening to them discuss the main characters and setting of the text (RL.K.1, RL.K.3).
  • During Work Time B, circulate and observe how students sort the photos of toys. Listen for them to explain how they are making groups as they sort the photos and support as needed (L.K.5a).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reading Aloud: Letter from the Principal (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud Session 1: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (20 minutes)

B. Noticing and Wondering: Sorting Photos of Toys (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Establishing Discussion Norms: Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • Students receive another letter from the principal with a challenge to become play experts by learning about the toys that others prefer. As in Units 1 and 2, this communication motivates students by giving their work throughout Unit 3, a purpose and an audience. Students are introduced to the Unit 3, guiding question: “What toys do others prefer?” Studying what others prefer helps young learners to move beyond their own point of view to consider those of others (D2.Civ.10.K-2).
  • In Work Time A, students hear Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon read aloud. Primary learners need to hear a large number of texts read aloud to build their word and world knowledge. Display the text when reading aloud. When doing a first read-aloud, read fluently, with expression and without interruption. For additional information, refer to the Module Overview.
  • The close read-aloud in Work Time A is meant to support a deep understanding of a worthy text, support students’ mastery of the CCSS reading informational or literature standards, and engage students with discussion, movement, and dramatic expression. Monitor both students’ understanding and their engagement; adjust the practice as necessary to support each (RL.K.1, RL.K.3).
  • In the Closing, students are introduced to the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart. Asking and answering questions is a focus in Unit 3, building toward the unit assessment in Lessons 9–10, in which students interview one another. (SL.K.3)
  • This lesson is the first in a series of three that include built out instruction for the use of Goal 2, Conversation Cues. Conversation Cues are questions teachers can ask students to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O’Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012. Based on Chapin, S., O’Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K–6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). Goal 2, Conversation Cues encourage students to listen carefully to one another and seek to understand. Continue drawing on Goal 1, Conversation Cues, introduced in Unit 1, Lesson 3, and add Goal 2, Conversation Cues to more strategically promote productive and equitable conversation. As the modules progress, Goal 3 and 4, Conversation Cues are also introduced. Refer to the Module 1 Appendix for additional information on Conversation Cues. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper. Examples of the Goal 2, Conversation Cues you will see in this unit and Module 2, Unit 1, are (with expected responses):
    • To help students listen carefully to one another and seek to understand:

Teacher: “Who can repeat what your classmate said?”

Student: “She said _____.”

Teacher: “Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?”

Student: “He was saying that _____.”

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Unit 1, students explored toys with a focus on social-emotional skills needed to play together well. In Unit 2, students discussed attributes and preferences of toys to develop their descriptive language skills. In this unit, students build on the work of Units 1 and 2, to learn about and describe the toys that they prefer and others prefer.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • In this unit, students are introduced to the concept of time “long ago.” Young learners are often challenged by the idea of time in the past. To clarify students’ understanding, explain that the past can mean many years ago, or it can mean yesterday. In this unit, “long ago” will mean the time when older grown-ups, such as grandparents or great-grandparents, were children.
  • Consider whether students are relying too heavily on their background knowledge about toys over classroom information about the topic or text. For example, some students may not own or use electronic toys. Students need to be clear about the distinction between their background knowledge and textual information and where the two may overlap or diverge. To this end, consider making background knowledge activities short or a period of silent reflection or both. Then, once students have gained text-based knowledge, revisit the background knowledge activities and discuss background in light of the topic or text.

Down the road:

  • In this lesson, students engage in an exploratory sort of toys now and long ago. In Lessons 2–4, students will hear Playing with Friends—an informational text—read aloud, which will support their understanding of toys and play long ago.
  • In Lessons 5–6, students will synthesize their learning about toys now and long ago by creating a new toy using recycled materials. Begin gathering recycled materials in your classroom now. If possible, enlist the help of others in the community, such as colleagues and families. A list of recommended items includes:
    • cotton balls
    • cotton swabs
    • cardboard containers/pieces
    • paper towel/toilet paper rolls
    • plastic bottle caps
    • plastic containers/bottles
    • buttons
    • yarn/string
  • If possible, provide a time for students to explore the recycled materials in an open-ended manner before using them in Lesson 6 to create a toy.
  • As a part of the Celebration of Learning in Lesson 13, the principal and other adults or older students will be invited to visit the classroom and participate in students’ sharing their performance tasks. Invite visitors in advance, so they can clear schedules and be prepared to participate. An example Invitation to Colleagues for Celebration of Learning is included in the supporting materials. Consider also inviting families to attend the Celebration of Learning.

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display the Letter from the Principal and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Prepare:
    • Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • Location for sorting photos during Work Time B. Designate areas of the classroom, whether at tables or on the floor, where students can spread out photos and sort them on their Now and Long Ago T-chart.
    • Photos of toys now and from long ago. Each pair will need four photos of toys now and four photos of toys from long ago.
    • Toys and Play Word Wall card for the word imagination. Write or type the word on a card and create or find a visual to accompany it.
  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide for Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (Session 1; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students. Note that the Close Read-aloud Guide is broken into sessions. Only complete Session 1 in this lesson; students will complete the remaining sessions in Lessons 2–7.
  • Strategically pair students for partner work during Work Time B.
  • Cut out and prepare sets of photos of toys to sort for the Now and Long Ago T-charts during Work Time B. In each set, there should be four photos of toys now and four photos of toys from long ago. If the toys shown in the photos do not adequately represent your students’ backgrounds, consider using other photos or asking families to support the class’s work by sending in photos of toys that older family members played with.
  • Post: Learning targets, Unit 3, guiding question, Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart, and Conversation Partner chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Work Time B: Create Now and Long Ago anchor chart in an online format, for example a Google Doc, to display.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Record students as they work in pairs to listen to later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.B.6 and K.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by building on prior knowledge of sorting using graphic organizers and photographs.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to digest several potentially new concepts, as this lesson sets the stage for the entire unit. Clarify as necessary, but reassure students that they will revisit most of the new concepts throughout the unit.
  • Students will have varying experience with different kinds of toys. It is possible that some may even play with toys that are in the “long ago” category. Be clear about the categories and refer back to the text whenever possible to account for varying background knowledge and experience.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Closing and Assessment A, invite advanced or intermediate proficiency students to demonstrate for the class using the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart to ask one another questions.

For heavier support:

  • Throughout the first session of the close read-aloud, stop often to check for comprehension. Ask students to summarize the events and ideas in the text. When necessary, paraphrase the events in more comprehensible language.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): This lesson incorporates several opportunities for students to engage with text, including the letter from the principal and identifying key story elements. Consider displaying the text graphically and orally to facilitate multiple means of perception and visual scaffolds to support the acquisition of unfamiliar vocabulary. (Example: When discussing story elements, use a picture of a person to represent characters or a house to represent setting.)
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Students are asked to use a T-chart to sort toys from today and from long ago. Offer various methods of response and navigation for students to display their knowledge and sorting ability on the T-chart. In the wrap-up discussion, anticipate students’ needs by preparing additional questions scaffolded for those who may struggle with the whole group question.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Students draw on the text to complete the sorting activity. To facilitate comprehension, activate their prior knowledge: Offer multiple opportunities to make explicit connections to the text and/or their individual experience.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • setting, characters, imagination, image, others, questions (L)

Review:

  • prefer, sort, identify (L)

Materials

  • Document camera (optional)
  • Letter from the Principal (one to display)
  • Toys and Play Word Wall card (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
  • Toys and Play Word Wall (begun in Unit 1)
  • Unit 3, guiding question (one to display)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (Session 1; for teacher reference)
    • Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Grandma Teaches Molly Lou anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see Close Read-aloud Guide)
    • Picture Story Paper: Student Version
    • What Does Molly Lou Make? Response Sheet
    • Toys Molly Lou and Gertie Prefer Anchor Chart
  • Now and Long Ago T-chart (one per pair and one to display; see supporting materials)
  • Photo of a toy from now (one for teacher modeling)
  • Photo of a toy from long ago (one for teacher modeling)
  • Set of photos of toys from now and long ago (one set per pair; see Teaching Notes)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1)
  • Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • Conversation Partner chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Invitation to Colleagues for Celebration of Learning (see supporting materials)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Aloud: Letter from the Principal (10 minutes)

  • Invite students together whole group.
  • Using a document camera, display the Letter from the Principal and read aloud the greeting and first paragraph fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Briefly review the principal’s riddle by asking students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What toy is invisible, can be played with any time, and makes every other toy MORE fun?” (your imagination)

  • Show students the Toys and Play Word Wall card for imagination.
  • Define imagination. Say: “Imagination is the power of the mind to make a thought or picture of something that is not real.” Explain that students now know that an imagination is the best toy!
  • Place the Word Wall card and picture for imagination on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • Reread the word imagination aloud slowly, and then explain that there is a word inside the word imagination. Say the word image and invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What does image mean?” (An image is a picture.)

  • Explain that an image is a picture, and you make pictures in your mind with your imagination.
  • After you define the word image and connect it to imagination, invite the whole class to close their eyes and imagine an image in their mind. As the students are thinking, ask questions to help them clarify their image. Examples:

“What is happening?”

“Who or what is in your image?”

  • Direct students’ attention back to the Letter from the Principal and read the second paragraph aloud fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Define others (everyone except yourself).
  • Read the third paragraph aloud fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Explain that this week students will learn more about the toys that others prefer. They will learn about their classmates as well as children long ago.
  • Refer to the posted Unit 3, guiding question and read it aloud:

“What toys do others prefer? Why do they prefer them?”

  • Emphasize the words others and prefer. If necessary, remind students of the meaning of the word prefer (to like something more than something else).
  • Practice using the word prefer with the class. Say:

“I prefer to write with pen instead of pencil.”

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you prefer to write with?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Direct students’ attention back to the Letter from the Principal and read the rest of it aloud.
  • Briefly preview the Celebration of Learning, explaining that the principal and some other adults/older students will be coming to visit the classroom and learn about toys and play from the play experts—the students in this classroom!
  • Have some students share out the image that they created in their imagination to the rest of the class. This will build engagement through connections to key vocabulary. It also provides peer examples for students who may be confused or unfamiliar with the definition of imagination. (MME, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Remind students that a riddle is like a tricky question. It gives clues or hints about the answer. Model thinking aloud about the riddle without revealing the answer. Remind students that they heard a similar question in Toys Galore. Provide extra wait time for students to think about the clues and generate answers.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud Session 1: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can identify the characters and setting in a story that is read to me.”

  • Explain that students will hear a new book read aloud, and they will identify, or name, the characters in the story. Define characters (a person in a story).
  • Explain that they will also identify the setting (the time and place in which something happens).
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What are some examples of different settings you already know?” (home, classroom, playground)

  • Summarize the learning target. Say: “So this target means we will be able to name the place and people in this story.”
  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud of Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (Session 1; for teacher reference)
  • Refer to the guide for the use of the Grandma Teaches Molly Lou anchor chart.
  • To help students generalize key story elements, such as characters and setting to other texts, a reusable chart might be useful. Include both the words characters and setting, as well as a visual cue (e.g., stick people for characters, a house for setting). The chart could be on an interactive whiteboard, a regular whiteboard, or laminated paper that can be erased and reused. Each time you discuss these story elements in various texts, go back to the chart and write down the specific characters and setting as appropriate for the specific text. This way, students begin to look for these key elements in every text they encounter. (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: To check for comprehension and to facilitate active listening, invite students to listen for characters and settings whenever they are named in the text. Invite students to put their hands on their heads when they hear a character or a setting.

B. Noticing and Wondering: Sorting Photos of Toys (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can sort toys into groups of toys now and toys from long ago.”

  • Briefly review the definition of sort (to put into groups).
  • Remind students of the categories they used to sort toys in previous lessons. (color, texture, shape, etc.)
  • Explain that today students will sort photos of toys into two groups: toys children play with now, and toys children played with long ago. Remind them that long ago is the time when their grandparents or great-grandparents were children. They might have played with these toys!
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target.
  • Direct students to the posted Now and Long Ago T-chart.
  • Show them a photo of a toy from now and model thinking aloud about which group it belongs in. (Ex: “I recognize this toy. It is a scooter that kids ride on the sidewalk or driveway, and I have seen it in toy stores. This toy belongs in the Now group.”)
  • Place the photo of the toy in the Now column of the T-chart.
  • Show students a photo of a toy from long ago and model thinking aloud about which group it belongs in. (Ex: “I have not seen this kind of toy before. It looks very old and is made of wood. I think this toy belongs in the Long Ago group.”)
  • Place the photo of the toy in the Long Ago column of the T-chart.
  • Explain that students will now work in pairs to sort a set of photos.
  • Move students into predetermined pairs and distribute a set of photos of toys now and long ago and Now and Long Ago T-charts to each pair.
  • Call pairs to move to designated areas and begin sorting the toy photos on their Now and Long Ago T-chart.
  • As pairs sort, circulate and engage with students about their thinking. Consider prompting them by asking questions such as:

“Why do you think this is a toy from long ago/now?”

“What attribute makes you think it is now/from long ago?”

  • Also, consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • After 8–10 minutes, signal all students to stop through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle.
  • Instruct them to leave their Now and Long Ago T-chart and walk safely to the whole group gathering area.
  • For ELLs: Activate students’ prior knowledge by drawing connections to the text. Ask:

“What types of toys did Molly Lou play with at the beginning of the story?

“How are they different from the toys that her Grandma describes playing with when she was a child?” (Molly Lou’s are store bought, but her grandma’s are homemade from natural materials such as sticks and leaves). (MME)

  • Activate students’ prior knowledge by asking what they anticipate may be differences between toys children play with now and those children played with long ago (e.g., electronic/not electronic, plastic/handmade materials, etc.). This will set students up for success in the sorting process. This can be done small group or whole group, depending on students’ needs. (MME)
  • For ELLs: On the Now and Long Ago T-chart, offer flexible display options, by including a visual to represent each column of the T-chart along with the words (e.g., a picture of Molly Lou for toys from today and a picture of her Grandma for toys from long ago). Some students may need the columns to have visual targets for how to place the pictures on the paper. (Example: Draw four boxes, one for each photo, or segment the column into four sections.) (MMR)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Establishing Discussion Norms: Ways We Ask Others Questions Anchor Chart (10 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention back to the second learning target and read it aloud:

“I can sort toys into groups of toys now and toys long ago.”

  • Give students specific positive, feedback on reaching this target by sorting photos of toys. (Example: “I noticed that you looked very carefully at the photos to decide whether it was a toy from now or from long ago.”)
  • Explain that to learn more about others, now or long ago, students will need to know how to ask questions.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What are questions?” (sentences that ask for answers)

  • Provide a few simple examples as necessary. (Examples: “What is your favorite color?” or “How did you get to school?”)
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart and read the title of the chart aloud.
  • Explain that this chart will help students remember what to do when they are asking others questions.
  • Read each statement on the Ways We Ask Other Questions anchor chart aloud, referring to the picture to support understanding:
    • Use question words. (who, what, when, where, why, how)
    • Make eye contact.
    • Listen to answers.
    • Share what you heard.
  • Model briefly what this should look like with a student volunteer.

1. Assign yourself as partner A and the volunteer as partner B.

2. Hold up a photo of a toy from long ago (from the sort).

3. Ask your partner:

“How do you think this toy was played with?”

4. Model the statements on the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart as your partner shares an answer.

  • Tell students that now it is their turn to ask a partner the same question.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partner chart, invite students to pair up with their predetermined talking buddy and sit facing each other. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B and walk them through the sharing process. Repeat the question:

“How do you think this toy was played with?”

  • Invite Partner A to begin sharing.
  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Notice whether students are able to ask the question and listen to their partner’s response.
  • If productive, use a Goal 2, Conversation Cue to encourage students to listen carefully:

“Who can repeat what your classmate said?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Refocus whole group and invite students to share their partner’s response.
  • Refocus whole group and repeat the process with Partner B.
  • Invite a few students to share their responses to the question. Remind them of the ideas on the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart as necessary.
  • Preview Lesson 2’s, work with students: to ask questions to learn more about other students in the class!
  • Copy and distribute the Invitation to Colleagues for Celebration of Learning.       
  • For ELLs: If students need additional support with the question, “How do you think this toy was played with?” activate their prior knowledge by asking questions more directly connected to the story or the partner activity. Examples:
    • “Do you think this is a toy that Molly Lou or her grandma would play with? Why?”
    • “Do you think this is a toy that children play with today, or is it from long ago? Why?” (MME, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: While circulating, take note of ELLs who are using the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart effectively. Reinforce their actions by complimenting specific behaviors. (Example: “I love the way you are listening to what your partner is saying without talking or interrupting!”)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up