Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 3 and Play and Exploration with Dramatic Toys | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA GK:M1:U1:L4

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 3 and Play and Exploration with Dramatic Toys

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.1b: Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can participate in conversations with my classmates about our play and our materials. (SL.K.1)
  • I can use illustrations in the text to describe how Llama Llama feels. (RL.K.1, RL.K.7)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time B, circulate and observe students’ interactions as they play together. Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to assess students’ progress towards SL.K.1 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During the Think-Pair-Share protocol in the Closing, listen as students converse about their playtime. Use this information to inform instruction about conversation norms in subsequent lessons.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Toys and Play Word Wall (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud Session 3: Llama Llama Time to Share (20 minutes)

B. Developing Language: Play and Exploration with Dramatic Toys (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

B. Shared Writing: Ways We Take Care Brainstorm Chart (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students continue their close read of the unit’s anchor text, Llama Llama Time to Share. In Session 3, students work to use details in the illustrations to understand the characters’ feelings and gain a better understanding of the central message of the story (RL.K.1, RL.K.7).
  • Students explore a new classroom toy together. Through play, exploration, and reflection on their play, they build speaking and listening skills by conversing with one another (SL.K.1).
  • This lesson is the second in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O’Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012. Based on Chapin, S., O’Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K–6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). As the modules progress, Goal 2, 3, and 4 Conversation Cues will be gradually introduced. Goal 1 Conversation Cues encourage all students to talk and be understood. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 3, students were introduced to the learning target “I can participate in conversations with my classmates about our play and our materials.” Today, they revisit this learning target with a more specific focus on conversation about how to take care of others and materials. This addition supports the focus of students’ reflective conversations about their play, homing in on the concept of caring for others and materials. Revisiting a learning target over several lessons familiarizes students with its language and allows them to practice the skills in the target over time.

Looking ahead to future lessons:

  • In Lesson 5, students will conclude the close read-aloud of Llama Llama Time to Share and participate in the assessment. The assessment can take place in small groups either during Work Time B of Lesson 5 or during a different time of the day. Students will complete the assessment in groups of 6. Administration of the assessment will take approximately 15 minutes per group. The small group assessment can be completed over 2-3 days as needed.
  • During the Closing of Lessons 3–5, students add ideas to the Ways We Take Care brainstorm chart. These ideas will scaffold the creation of the Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart in Lesson 6, which will serve as an essential tool throughout the module.
  • If possible, take photos of students playing together during Work Time B. In Lesson 6, these photos will be used to support the creation of the Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart. Four specific behaviors will be listed on the chart: sharing, taking care of materials, inviting others in, and using kind words as they play. The photos should show students exemplifying these behaviors.

In Advance

  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide for Llama Llama Time to Share (Session 3; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students. Note that the Close Read-aloud Guide is divided into sessions. Complete only Session 3 in this lesson; students will complete the remaining session in Lesson 5.
  • The toys recommended for this lesson are any that encourage imaginative, collaborative play. Examples include toy vehicles, dolls, stuffed animals, figurines, toy food/kitchen items, community helper props, costumes, and puppets. Use your discretion in choosing a variety of toys that will be manageable while also encouraging students to converse during their play.
  • Consider and prepare the best classroom areas for small groups to explore dramatic play toys together. Set out toys in those areas.
  • The time allotted for cleaning up the toys assumes that students have had practice with cleanup procedures. If not, consider adding more explicit instruction and time.
  • Post: Learning targets, Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart, “Play Today” poem: Part III, and Ways We Take Care brainstorm chart.
  • Prepare Toys and Play Word Wall cards for the words include and care. Write or type the words in large print on a card and create or find a visual to accompany the words.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Work Time B: Record the whole group singing the “Play Today” poem: Part III and post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to listen to at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free audio recording apps or software.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Record students as they have their conversations to listen to with students later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.A.3, and K.I.B.6.

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing the opportunity to read closely complex text. This will expand academic vocabulary and allow students to comprehend and practice with syntax structures in English.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to communicate verbally during Work Time B. Group students heterogeneously by proficiency level so that higher proficiency students can take the lead. If possible, group students who speak the same home language. Using their home language will make them more comfortable discussing play in English; it will also facilitate transfer of communication skills across languages. When children are pretending, be aware of games that may be culturally specific and could exclude some students.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Closing and Assessment B, students might be unfamiliar with the concept of “brainstorming.” Explain that it is a way to think of ideas and that there is no right or wrong answer. For beginning proficiency students, wait a few turns to call on them. Allow sufficient wait time for them to share their ideas. If necessary, consider allowing students to consult with a higher proficiency student to help solidify their ideas before sharing.

For heavier support:

  • Check for comprehension of key vocabulary words such as play, toys, and materials. Students may not speak up if they do not understand. Cold call students and ask them to share the meanings of the words, or point to a picture in Llama Llama Time to Share and ask: “Is Llama playing in this picture?”

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of representation (MMR): This lesson includes several new vocabulary words. To provide additional support for visual learners, offer alternatives for auditory information by including an illustration or photo on word cards for each key word introduced.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, students practice talking to peers about play during a Think-Pair-Share. Some students may need additional support in knowing how to engage in conversation with peers. Provide options for communication by prompting students with sentence frames.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): This lesson introduces students to dramatic play toys. To optimize the relevance and value of dramatic play, select toys that are personally motivating to individual students.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • brainstorm, disaster, emergency, fair (L)

Review:

  • illustrations, materials, text (L)

Materials

  • Toys and Play Word Wall cards (teacher-created; two)
  • Toys and Play Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Lesson 1)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Llama Llama Time to Share (from Lesson 2; Session 3; for teacher reference)
    • Llama Llama Time to Share (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • LLama Llama puppet and Nelly Gnu puppet
    • Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart (from Lesson 3; added to in Work Time A)
  • Llama Llama puppet and Nelly Gnu puppet
  • “Play Today” poem: Part III (written on chart paper; one to display)
  • Dramatic play toys (variety of items; divided into groups for three or four students to play with together; see Teaching Notes)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Ways We Take Care brainstorm chart (begun in Lesson 3; added to in Closing and Assessment B; see supporting materials)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Toys and Play Word Wall (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Direct their attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can participate in conversations with my classmates about our play and our materials.”

  • Point to and read the word play on the Toys and Play Word Wall. Remind students that when we play, we do an activity that is fun.
  • Remind students that materials are things we use, and when we play, the materials we use are toys.
  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Redirect students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

"I can use illustrations in the text to describe how Llama Llama feels.”

  • Briefly review the target, referring to the posted Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart if needed. Remind students that the word illustrations means pictures and text is another name for the book.
  • Invite students to use their magic bows and take aim at the second learning target.
  • For ELLs: Remind students that take care of are words that we hear a lot together, and they mean to help people or things we care about. Ask: “What is the meaning of care in the languages we speak at home?” (chăm sóc in Vietnamese) Invite all students to repeat the translation in a different home language. (MMR)
  • As you review words on the Toys and Play Word Wall, offer alternatives for auditory information by including an illustration or photo on each word card you discuss. (MMR)
  • When reciting the “Learning Target” poem, provide differentiated mentors by strategically seating students who feel more comfortable reciting the poem aloud near students who may not feel as comfortable. (MMAE)
  • After reviewing the Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart, optimize individual choice by inviting students to choose one feeling to show with a facial expression. (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud Session 3: Llama Llama Time to Share (20 minutes)

  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Llama Llama Time to Share using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Llama Llama Time to Share (Session 3; for teacher reference)
  • During Session 3, refer to the guide for the use of the Llama Llama puppet and Nelly Gnu puppet, as well as the Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart.
  • For ELLs: Call on a beginning proficiency student to act out one of the puppet roles. The kinesthetic interpretation of the text will help the student comprehend the language. If the student struggles to invent dialogue for his or her character, allow another student to provide dialogue and the beginning student may repeat the line. Invite students to offer dialogue in their home languages. (MMAE)

B. Developing Language: Play and Exploration with Dramatic Toys (25 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted “Play Today” poem: Part III.
  • Read it aloud, pointing to each word as you say it.
  • Tell students you will read the poem again, and this time they should join in.
  • Reread the poem with students.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you think this part of the poem is about?” (playing a game or playing together)

  • Explain that the toys today are toys that you can pretend with, or play pretending games with.
  • Point to the seventh line and reread it aloud:

“The game can change to include you. Because this is more fun too.”

  • Briefly explain that include means to invite others to play or to say “yes” when others ask to play.
  • Post the Toys and Play Word Wall card for the word include on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What is an action we can do while reading this part that shows what the poem is saying?” (pretending to invite someone to play by waving a hand)

  • Tell students you are going to read the poem aloud again and incorporate their ideas for actions. Invite them to join you as you begin reading and acting.
  • Invite students to move to a spot around the edge of the whole group gathering area so everyone can see the toys in the middle. As needed, remind them to move safely and make space for everyone.
  • Introduce dramatic play toys by placing them in the middle of the gathering area. Tell students that in a few minutes, they are going to get to play, and it will be important to include others during play.
  • Invite students to think about how they would like to play with each kind of toy by asking:

“How could you pretend with it? What games could you play with others?”

  • Revisit the first learning target to remind students that they will need to talk to each other so they can take care of each other.
  • Briefly explain what students will need to do to take care of the dramatic play toys, keeping directions brief and clear. Instructions might include: Include others in your play, share the different materials, and listen to others’ ideas.
  • Call students in groups of three or four to go to predetermined areas and begin playing with the dramatic toys.
  • Give students 10–15 minutes to play. As they play in small groups, circulate and engage with students about their play. Consider prompting them by saying and asking:

“Tell me what you are making/playing.”

“What/how are you playing?”

  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Signal students to stop playing with a designated sound such as a chime or whistle.
  • Model cleanup procedures, keeping directions clear and brief.
  • Direct students to clean up their play area and then walk safely to the whole group gathering area. If using a designated cleanup song, remind students to clean up and walk safely to the whole group gathering area by the end of the song.
  • For ELLs: Display the cover of Llama Llama Time to Share and point to Nelly Gnu. Explain that Nelly wanted to be included in Llama’s game because it is more fun to play together. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Introduce language for including others and asking to play together. Examples: “May I play with you?” “Would you like to play with us?” Have students chorally repeat the phrases and practice asking with their partners. Role-play or Fishbowl a scenario in which this language applies. Prompt students to practice using these phrases as they play with their dramatic toys. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Encourage students who speak the same home language to play in their home languages or teach some words in their home language to English speakers. Say: “One of the reasons playing is so fun is you can do it in any language!” (MMAE)
  • After you introduce the dramatic play toys, support strategy development by providing time for students to think quietly about how they could play with each kind of toy. Invite students to give you a thumbs-up when they have come up with an idea. (MMAE)
  • As you select dramatic play toys, optimize the relevance and value of dramatic play by choosing toys that are personally motivating to individual students. (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and revisit the first one:

“I can participate in conversations with my classmates about our play and our materials.”

  • Tell students they are going to Think-Pair-Share. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 3. Review and refer students to the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart as necessary.
  • Explain that students are going to Think-Pair-Share about this topic:

“Talk to your partner about your play time with the dramatic play toys. What did you do?”

  • Guide students through one round of Think-Pair-Share.
  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Listen for them to share about their play, including what they made or how they played.
  • Refocus whole group and invite a few students to share their ideas with the class.
  • Guide students through a second round of Think-Pair-Share with these questions:

“During play, how did you take care of others? How did you take care of the toys?” (talked during play, took turns, included others)

  • If productive, use a Goal 1 Conversation Cue to encourage students to expand the conversation about taking care of others:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Listen for them to share about their play, including what they made or how they played.
  • Refocus whole group and invite a few students to share their ideas with the class.
  • For ELLs: Point out that when students converse, it is polite to make eye contact. Be aware that in some cultures, making eye contact is less common or even considered impolite. If students are uncomfortable doing so at first, allow them to operate within their comfort level. Demonstrate what it looks like to make eye contact and encourage students to practice. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Briefly facilitate a final round of Think-Pair-Share after Shared Writing. Students who may have had trouble verbalizing during the initial round can use the brainstorm chart to scaffold their speech. (MMAE)
  • Before beginning the second round of Think-Pair-Share, activate background knowledge by briefly reminding students of the ideas they came up with on the Ways We Take Care brainstorm chart. (MMR)
  • As students Think-Pair-Share, provide options for communication by prompting students to use sentence frames for talking about dramatic play toys. Example: “When I was playing with ____, I pretended to _________.” (MMAE)

B. Shared Writing: Ways We Take Care Brainstorm Chart (5 minutes)

  • Give students specific positive feedback on their continued efforts to become play experts, emphasizing their ability to talk about the ways they took care of others and the materials during play.
  • Explain that today the class will continue to brainstorm, or share ideas, about how to care for each other and their materials.
  • Focus students’ attention on the Ways to Take Care of Others column on the posted Ways We Take Care brainstorm chart.
  • Ask students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What is one idea you would add to this column?” (say “please” and “thank you,” invite others to join)

  • Call on pairs to share out.
  • As students share, clarify and capture their ideas on the anchor chart, writing down the language they use as accurately as possible. If possible, model referring to the Toys and Play Word Wall as a tool to help when spelling content-related words.
  • Repeat this process with the Ways to Take Care of Our Materials column. (don’t break anything, share toys with others)
  • Give students specific positive feedback on their hard work today.
  • Once the brainstorm chart is complete, encourage reflection by asking a series of questions regarding ideas for taking care. Example: “Put your hands on your shoulders if you saw someone ______ (using toys correctly, putting toys away, sharing, taking turns, speaking kindly) while we were playing with dramatic play toys.” (MME)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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