Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 2 and Play and Exploration with Pattern Blocks | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA GK:M1:U1:L3

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 2 and Play and Exploration with Pattern Blocks

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.1b: Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can participate in conversations with my classmates about our play and our materials. (SL.K.1)
  • I can use illustrations in the text to describe how Llama Llama feels. (RL.K.1, RL.K.7)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time B, circulate and observe students’ interactions as they play together. Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to assess students’ progress toward SL.K.1 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During the Think-Pair-Share protocol in the Closing, observe students conversing about their playtime. Use this information to inform instruction about conversation norms in subsequent lessons.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reinforcing Norms for Conversation (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud Session 2: Llama Llama Time to Share (20 minutes)

B. Developing Language: Play and Exploration with Pattern Blocks (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

B. Shared Writing: Ways We Take Care Brainstorm Chart (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students continue their close read of the unit’s anchor text, Llama Llama Time to Share by Anna Dewdney. In Session 2, students are introduced to the Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart, a tool that will help them to use the pictures and words in the story to describe the character’s feelings. Focusing on the details in the illustrations helps young students to “read” the text using the illustrations, giving them confidence as they approach complex texts (RL.K.7).
  • Students explore a new classroom toy together. Through play, exploration, and reflection on their play, they build speaking and listening skills by conversing with one another (SL.K.1).
  • In the Closing, students reflect on their play to co-create the Ways to Take Care brainstorm chart (SL.K.1).
  • This lesson is the first in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 1 Conversation Cues. Conversation Cues are questions teachers can ask students to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O’Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012.  Based on Chapin, S., O’Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K–6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). Goal 1 Conversation Cues encourage all students to talk and be understood. As the modules progress, Goal 2, 3, and 4 Conversation Cues are gradually introduced. See the Tools page for the complete set of cues. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper. Examples of the Goal 1 Conversation Cues you will see in the next two units are (with expected responses):
    • After any question that requires thoughtful consideration:

“I’ll give you time to think and sketch.”

“I’ll give you time to discuss this with a partner.”

    • To help students share, expand, and clarify thoughts:

“Can you say more about that?”

“Sure. I think that _____.”

“Can you give an example?”

“OK. One example is _____.”

“So, do you mean _____?”

"You’ve got it./No, sorry, that’s not what I mean. I mean _____.”

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • During Lessons 1–2, students were introduced to the learning target “I can participate in conversations with my classmates.” Today, they revisit this learning target with a more specific focus on conversation about their play. Revisiting a learning target over several lessons familiarizes students with its language and allows them to practice the skills in the target over time.

Looking ahead to future lessons:

  • This is the second lesson in a series of four (Lessons 2–5) in which students participate in a close reading of Llama Llama Time to Share and then explore a new classroom toy. Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide to fully understand the arc of these lessons and how the learning and skills build from one lesson to the next.
  • If possible, take photos of students playing together during Work Time B. In Lesson 6, these photos will be used to support the creation of the Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart. Four specific behaviors will be listed on the chart: sharing, taking care of materials, inviting others in, and using kind words as they play. The photos should show students exemplifying these behaviors.
  • During the Closing of Lessons 3–5, students will add ideas to the Ways We Take Care brainstorm chart. The purpose of this chart is to hold students’ ideas about caring as they reflect on their own play each day. These ideas will scaffold the creation of the Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart in Lesson 6, which will serve as an essential tool throughout the module.

In Advance

  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide for Llama Llama Time to Share (Session 2; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students. Note that the Close Read-aloud Guide is divided into sessions. Complete only Session 2 in this lesson; students will complete the remaining sessions in Lessons 4–5.
  • Consider and prepare the best classroom areas for small groups to explore pattern blocks together. Set out pattern blocks in those areas.
  • If pattern blocks are not available, choose a similar toy that will help students build fine motor skills and spatial awareness, as well as encourage collaborative play. Examples: wooden blocks, K’Nex, or Magna-Tiles.
  • The time allotted for cleaning up pattern blocks assumes that students have had practice with cleanup procedures. Consider adding more explicit instruction and time as necessary.
  • Post: Learning targets, Conversation Norms anchor chart, Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart, “Play Today” poem: Part II, Think-Pair-Share anchor chart, and Ways We Take Care brainstorm chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: If you recorded the “Talk and Listen” song in the previous lesson, play it for students to sing along to.
  • Opening A: Record the whole group singing the “Play Today” poem: Part II and post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to listen to at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free audio recording apps or software.
  • Work Time A: Create the Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart in an online format, for example a Google Doc, to display.
  • Work Time B and Closing and Assessment A: Record students as they have their conversations to listen to with students later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free audio recording apps or software.
  • Closing and Assessment B: Create the Ways We Take Care chart in an online format, for example a Google Doc, to display.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.A.3, and K.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing the opportunity to read closely complex text. This will expand academic vocabulary and allow students to comprehend and practice with syntax structures in English.
  • ELLs by find responding to text-dependent questions challenging. Model thinking aloud the answers to the questions and remind students that there are important clues in the illustrations. Provide extra wait time for students to process the questions and formulate answers.
  • During parts of this lesson, when students are singing or reading chorally, listen for those who may be bashful or confused. Encourage them to participate and to try their best.
  • Explain the purpose and goals of Conversation Cues to students and that they should listen closely for them, as they will respond to Conversation Cues throughout this curriculum.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • When asking about the learning target sentence during Opening A, challenge students to generate questions about the sentence before asking the prepared questions. Example: “What questions can we ask about this sentence? Let’s see if we can answer them together.”

For heavier support:

  • Before Work Time A, pre-teach emotion words from Llama Llama Time to Share, such as worried and nervous. Example: “People can be worried when they think something bad will happen or they might get into trouble. Have you ever been worried?”

Students may need extra support and reminders for close reading protocols. Consider creating hand signals for when it is time to listen, time to raise hands, time to answer questions chorally, and time to Think-Pair-Share.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Throughout this lesson, embed support for unfamiliar vocabulary by providing explanation and visual examples. This will help students make connections and support comprehension.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, students practice talking to peers during play. Some students may need additional support in knowing how to initiate conversation with peers. Provide options for communication by prompting students with sentence frames.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): The importance of “talking to each other while you play” is highlighted in this lesson. This is a great opportunity to anticipate problems that may arise during play and discuss conflict resolution. Consider introducing and displaying a peer mediation chart for resolving conflicts with pictures and prompts.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • visit, frown (T)
  • materials, describe, illustrations, text (L)

Review:

  • play (L)

Materials

  • “Talk and Listen” song (from Lesson 2; for teacher reference)
  • Conversation Norms anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Toys and Play Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Lesson 1)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Llama Llama Time to Share (from Lesson 2; Session 2; for teacher reference)
    • Llama Llama Time to Share (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Llama Llama puppet and Nelly Gnu puppet
    • Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A)
  • “Play Today” poem: Part II (written on chart paper; one to display)
  • Pattern blocks (class set; divided into containers for groups of three or four students to play with together)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Ways We Take Care brainstorm chart (new; co-created with students during Closing)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reinforcing Norms for Conversation (5 minutes)

  • Gather students together whole group.
  • Invite them to quietly and quickly stand up.
  • Model singing the “Talk and Listen” song, inviting students to join in if they remember it.
  • Sing the song a second time as a whole group.
  • Invite students to sit down.
  • Give students specific positive feedback on their ability to participate in conversations with others by following the norms for conversation in Lesson 2.
  • Briefly review the Conversation Norms anchor chart.
  • Tell students that today there will be a similar target, but with an extra challenge. Direct their attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can participate in conversations with my classmates about our play and our materials.”

  • Explain that students will talk to each other about their play and their materials, or the toys they use to play.
  • Point to and read the word play on the Toys and Play Word Wall. Remind students that when we play, we do an activity that is fun.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

 “Why do you think it is important to talk to each other while you play?” (talking might help to solve problems)

  • If productive, use a Goal 1 Conversation Cue to encourage students to clarify the conversation about collaborate play:

 “So, do you mean _____?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about this sentence from the learning targets: “I can participate in conversations with my classmates about our play and our materials.” Examples:

“What does it mean to participate in conversations?” (to take turns talking)

“Who are your classmates?” (our friends; the other kindergarteners)

“Who is the sentence talking about with the word our?” (the class; the toys and the play belong to us)

“What does this learning target mean? Can you say it in your own words?” (I can talk to my friends about toys.)

  • As you discuss the importance of “talking to each other while you play,” foster community by introducing and displaying a visual that can be used when problems arise during play. Example: a peer mediation chart with pictures and sentence starters such as: “I didn’t like it when you _______. It made me feel ______. One solution is __________.” (give a hug, draw a picture, choose something new to play together, etc.) (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud Session 2: Llama Llama Time to Share (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can use illustrations in the text to describe how Llama Llama feels.”

  • Explain that illustrations are the pictures. The text is the book. Today, they will look closely at the illustrations, or pictures, to find out how Llama Llama feels when he meets Nelly Gnu.
  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the second learning target.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Llama Llama Time to Share using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Llama Llama Time to Share (Session 2; for teacher reference)
  • During Session 2, refer to the guide for the use of the Llama Llama puppet and Nelly Gnu puppet, as well as the Llama Llama’s Feelings anchor chart.
  • For ELLs: Prepare students for finding details as clues for emotions. Make a frown and ask: “How do I feel? How do you know? What is a detail on my face that tells you I am sad?” Briefly introduce the words smile and frown. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: To practice using the present simple tense to talk about feelings, prompt students to answer key questions with a sentence frame. Example: “Llama feels _______” or “Gnu feels _______.” If students omit the -s at the end of feels, recast the sentence and prompt them to repeat it. (MMAE)
  • As you review the Llama Llama Feelings anchor chart, vary methods of response by inviting students to show you with facial expressions the meaning of each emotion. (MMAE)
  • B. Developing Language: Play and Exploration with Pattern Blocks (25 minutes)
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted “Play Today” poem: Part II.
  • Read it aloud, pointing to each word as you say it.
  • Tell students you will read the poem again, and this time they should join in.
  • Reread the poem with students.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What toy do you think this part of the poem is about?” (blocks or building blocks)

  • Point to the seventh line and reread it aloud:

“Maybe a trade is what to do. Here is my purple one for your blue.”

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What is happening here?” (They are trading toys.)

"What is an action we can do while reading this part that shows what the poem is saying?” (building with blocks and trading)

  • Tell students you are going to read the poem aloud again and incorporate their ideas for actions. Invite them to join you as you begin reading and acting.
  • Explain that the toy in this poem is the toy that students will play with today … very soon!
  • Invite students to move to a spot around the edge of the whole group gathering area so everyone can see the toy in the middle. As needed, remind them to move safely and make space for everyone.
  • Introduce pattern blocks by placing them in the middle of the gathering area. Tell students that in a few minutes, they are going to get to play!
  • Direct student’s attention back to the “Play Today” poem: Part II and reread the second line:

“Let us talk about it, then we will see.”

  • Remind students that yesterday at the end of the lesson, they talked about taking care of each other and materials. Briefly reference the principal’s letter from Lesson 1, mentioning the principal’s challenge to become play experts by learning how to play together.
  • Tell students that today they will continue to learn to play together by exploring the pattern blocks together.
  • Invite students to think about how they would like to play with the blocks by asking:

“What could you make with the pattern blocks?” How could you pretend with them?”

  • Revisit the second learning target to remind students that they will need to talk to each other while playing.
  • Briefly explain what students will need to do to take care of the pattern blocks, keeping directions brief and clear. Instructions might include: Build in your area and share the different shapes and colors.
  • Call students in groups of three or four to go to predetermined areas and begin playing with the pattern blocks.
  • Give students 10–15 minutes to play. As they play in small groups, circulate and engage with them about their play. Consider prompting students by saying and asking:

“Tell me what you are making/playing.”

“What/how are you playing?”

  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Signal all students to stop playing with a designated sound such as a chime or whistle. If time allows, practice responding to the signal a few times to reinforce this routine.
  • Model cleanup procedures, keeping directions clear and brief.
  • Direct students to clean up their play area and then walk safely to the whole group gathering area. Consider playing a particular song during the cleanup process and remind students that they will need to complete their cleanup by the end of the song.
  • For ELLs: Briefly explain trading. Give a blue block to one student and hold a purple block. Say: “If I want to trade, that means I want Claudia to give me her purple block, and I am going to give Claudia my blue block so that it is fair.” Demonstrate trading with the student. Provide a sentence frame so students can practice tra ding. Example: “I’ll give you my _________ for your _______.” (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Show a few examples of premade pattern block sculptures so that students who may have never played with them have a concrete model for possible outcomes. (MMR)
  • As students talk with peers during play, provide options for communication by prompting students with sentence frames. Example: “I like how you are using the pattern blocks to ____.” or “I am using pattern blocks to make _______. Do you want to help me?” (MMAE)
  • As students clean up, encourage effort and persistence by providing frequent, timely, and specific positive feedback to individual students. (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and revisit the first one:

“I can participate in conversations with my classmates about our play and our materials.”

  • Tell students they are going to Think-Pair-Share. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 2. Review and refer students to the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart as necessary.
  • Explain that students are going to Think-Pair-Share about this topic:

“Talk to your partner about your play time with the pattern blocks. What did you do?”

  • Guide students through one round of Think-Pair-Share.
  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Listen for them to share about their play, including what they made or how they played.
  • Refocus whole group and invite a few students to share their ideas with the class.
  • Guide students through a second round of Think-Pair-Share with these questions:

“During play, how did you take care of others? How did you take care of the pattern blocks?” (used materials safely, took turns, talked to solve problems)

  • If productive, use a Goal 1 Conversation Cue to encourage students to expand the conversation about taking care of others:

“Can you give an example?” (Responses will vary.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Listen for them to share about their play, including what they made or how they played.
  • Refocus whole group and invite a few students to share their ideas with the class.
  • For ELLs: Use sentence frames to prompt discussion and to model standard syntax. Model using the sentence frames and invite students to use them during the Think-Pair-Share. Examples: “I made _________.” “I played with _______.” “I took care of the blocks when I _______.” (MMAE)
  • As students talk with partners about their play, provide graduated levels of support for sharing by prompting students to give specific details. Examples: “What color of blocks did you use? What shape of blocks did you use? What did you make with your blocks?” (MMAE)
  • After students share with their partners, optimize choice by recording their ideas for playing with pattern blocks on a whiteboard or chart paper labeled “Playing with Pattern Blocks” that can be used in subsequent sessions. Consider printing and posting photos of students as examples of ways to play with pattern blocks. (MME)

B. Shared Writing: Ways We Take Care Brainstorm Chart (5 minutes)

  • Give students specific positive feedback on their continued efforts to become play experts, emphasizing their ability to talk about the ways they took care of others and the materials during play.
  • Focus students’ attention on the Ways to Take Care of Others column on the posted Ways We Take Care brainstorm chart.
  • Ask students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What is one idea you would add to this column?” (share, take turns, speak kindly)

  • Call on pairs to share out.
  • As students share, clarify and capture their ideas on the anchor chart, write down the language they use as accurately as possible. If possible, model referring to the Toys and Play Word Wall as a tool to help when spelling content-related words.
  • Repeat this process with the Ways to Take Care of Our Materials column. (use toys correctly, put toys away)
  • Give students specific positive feedback on their hard work today. Tell them that in the next lesson, they will play with another toy!
  • For ELLs: Point out that take care of are words we hear a lot together. Example: “Remember, when we take care of someone, we are not really taking anything. It means we are helping someone or something that we care about.” Prompt students to practice using the phrase take care of. Ask: “Who takes care of you at home?” (My _________ takes care of me at home.) (MMR)
  • As you write each idea for taking care, provide options for expression by saying: “Give a silent signal (e.g., me too in American sign language) if you saw someone taking care of materials or a classmate this way while you were playing with pattern blocks.” (MMAE)
  • Once the brainstorm chart is complete, involve students in goal-setting by asking them to whisper one way they will try to take care the next time they play with pattern blocks. (MME)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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