Close Read-aloud, Session 2: Off to Class, Pages 12–13 | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA G2:M1:U2:L3

Close Read-aloud, Session 2: Off to Class, Pages 12–13

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.2.1: Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • RI.2.2: Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.
  • W.2.8: Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.2.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.2.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.2.1b: Build on others' talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others.
  • SL.2.1c: Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion.
  • L.2.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 2 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can answer questions using key details about the solution in “Protecting the Amazon” from Off to Class. (RI.2.1, RI.2.2, L.2.4)
  • I can plan and share my writing with a writing partner. (SL.2.1a, SL.2.1b, SL.2.1c, W.2.8)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Times A and B, use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to monitor student progress toward SL.2.1a, SL.2.1b, and SL.2.1c (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time C, circulate and observe students’ writing to monitor progress toward RI.2.1 and RI.2.2 and to notice whether students answer the questions correctly and use details from the text in their notes.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Close Reading (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud: Session 2, Off to Class, pages 12–13 (20 minutes)

B. Independent Writing: Working with a Writing Partner (15 minutes)

C. Analyzing a Model: Problem and Solution Informative Writing (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Song and Movement: “What Is School?” Song (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This is the second of six close read-aloud sessions of Off to Class. In this session, students explore the solution to the problem the school faced and the benefits the school provides its community. Students continue listening for important details and practicing taking notes (RI.2.1, RI.2.2).
  • During the close read, students participate in a Language Dive conversation that guides them through the meaning of a sentence from Off to Class. The conversation invites students to unpack complex syntax—or “academic phrases”—as a necessary component of building both literacy and habits of mind. The sentence was selected because it uses the relative pronoun which and for its connection to current and future content. Invite students to discuss each chunk briefly, but slow down to focus on the highlighted structure which gives them the chance to get a high school education. Students then apply their understanding of the structure of this sentence when writing their informative paragraphs. A consistent Language Dive routine is critical in helping all students learn how to decipher complex sentences and write their own. In addition, Language Dive conversations hasten overall English language development for ELLs. Consider providing students with a Language Dive log inside a folder to track Language Dive sentences and structures and collate Language Dive note-catchers.
  • In Work Time B, students practice working with their writing partners. Establishing this routine is important, as the writing tasks increase in rigor and the job of the writing partner in later lessons includes giving feedback (SL.2.1, SL.2.1a, SL.2.1b, SL.2.1c).
  • In Work Time B, students respond to a prompt after listening to a part of the text. Because students also have practiced taking notes after listening to text, clarify that there are different reasons for writing and that writing can be done for different audiences. Explicitly state that their writing response should be in complete sentences, with their best spelling and punctuation (W.2.8).
  • In Work Time C, students read and analyze a model of a problem and solution informative paragraph written about the school in the Brazilian rainforest. Reading and analyzing the model together will lay a foundational understanding of the parts of informative writing so that students can start writing their own paragraphs in subsequent lessons.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • As in Lesson 2, students practice listening to text and taking notes in their Off to Class notebook. Lesson 2 focused on collecting notes about the place and the problem, and this lesson focuses on collecting notes on the solution and the effect on the community.
  • Students continue writing independently in response to the text. Students review the job of writing partners (introduced in Lesson 2) and practice working with their writing partner before and after writing.
  • Throughout Unit 1, students were introduced to various total participation techniques (e.g., cold calling, Think-Pair-Share, etc.). When following the directive “Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group,” use one of these techniques or another familiar technique to encourage all students to participate.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • In Work Time C, students help you find parts of an informative paragraph. To ensure that all students understand the parts of the paragraph, consider using picture clues for each section, cutting the informative writing model up into the separate parts, or coloring the note sheet with the associated colors.
  • In the Closing, students revisit the What is School? Song from Unit 1. To ensure all students are participating, invite students to move their bodies in safe ways that are best for them (e.g., marching in place, jumping, twisting, acting out the song, etc.). Invite students who may need a job to lead the song or to point to the words on the chart as the song is sung.

Down the road:

  • In this lesson, students complete the problem-solution cycle about the school in the Amazon rainforest. In future lessons, students will repeat this same cycle two more times (about two different schools described in the text Off to Class). Monitor student notes to support them in answering the question correctly and with details from the text before the reading portion of the Unit 2 Assessment in Lessons 6–7.
  • In this lesson, students examine a model of a problem and solution informative paragraph (based on information gained from the text students read in the close read-aloud). In future lessons, students will write their own problem and solution informative paragraphs, using the notes they take during those close read-aloud sessions. Be explicit with students that problem and solution is just one type of writing and that in Unit 3, they will do a different type of informative writing (comparing and contrasting).

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display Off to Class and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide: Off to Class (Session 2) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Consider laying out the Off to Class notebooks in a way that makes it easy for students to access them during the close read-aloud.
  • Prepare:
    • Our Study of School Word Wall cards for solution and solar panels. Write or type each word on a card and create or find a visual to accompany it.
    • Problem and Solution Informative Writing Model: “The Rainforest School” (see supporting materials).
    • Parts of a Problem and Solution Informative Paragraph anchor chart (see supporting materials).
  • Post: Learning targets, Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart, Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart, How to Take Notes anchor chart, Writing Partners anchor chart, and “What Is School?” song.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Work Time B: Students complete the Off to Class notebooks using a word processing tool, for example a Google Doc.
  • Work Time B: Students use Speech to Text facilities activated on devices, or using an app or software like Dragon Dictation 
  • Work Time C: Display a word-processed version of the text and annotate using word-processing tools, for example colored highlighting.
  • Closing and Assessment A: If you recorded students singing the “What is School?” song in Unit 1, play this recording for them to join in with.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 2.I.A.1, 2.I.A.3, 2.I.B.5, 2.I.B.6, and 2.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to read informational text closely to determine the topic and key details. This provides students with valuable experience reading and interpreting complex text, which will foster English language development by exposing them to academic vocabulary and syntax.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to analyze the structure of an informative paragraph while they may also struggle to comprehend the language and content of the paragraph itself. Consider spending some additional time discussing the meaning of the Problem and Solution Informative Writing Model. Ask students if there is anything about the paragraph they do not understand. Consider annotating the paragraph with notes and illustrations representing the main idea of each part. If students are confused, reassure them that they will have plenty of time to practice reading and writing informative paragraphs.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Provide shorter sentence frames during the close read and during the Closing and Assessment. Example: “The village ____” or “I think ____.” This will prompt language while requiring students to generate more of their own syntax and content.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time, distribute partially filled-in copies of the relevant pages in the Off to Class notebook. This will provide students with models for the kind of information they should enter and reduce the volume of writing required. Refer to the Off to Class notebook (example, for teacher reference) to determine which sections of the materials to provide for students.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the Closing, discuss strategies for singing the “What Is School?” song loudly and clearly. Students may have difficulty reflecting on how to improve their own singing behavior without hearing it. Provide options for perception by audio recording the class singing the “What Is School?” song and playing it back to the group. Allow students to identify strengths and things to work on when singing as a group.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): During the close read-aloud, some students may benefit from sensory input and opportunities for movement while they are sitting. Provide options for differentiated seating, such as sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During Work Time B, students share their writing with a partner. Second-graders have a range of writing abilities and may feel nervous or uncomfortable sharing their work with a classmate. Create an accepting and supportive classroom climate by brainstorming ideas for how to recognize a writing partner’s efforts and give positive feedback. 

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • solution, recount (L)
  • solar panels (T)

Review:

  • informational

Materials

  • Our Study of School Word Wall cards (new; teacher-created; two cards; see Teaching Notes)
  • Our Study of School Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1; added to during Opening and Work Time A)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 7)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Off to Class (from Lesson 2; Session 2; for teacher reference)
    • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
    • Off to Class (from Lesson 2; one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Off to Class notebook (from Lesson 2; pages 2 and 4; one per student)
    • Off to Class notebook (from Lesson 2; pages 2 and 4; example, for teacher reference)
    • How to Take Notes anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
    • Sentence strip chunks I: Off to Class (one to display)
  • Writing Partners anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Problem and Solution Informative Writing Model: “The Rainforest School” (one to display)
  • Markers (green, yellow and blue; one of each for teacher modeling)
  • Parts of a Problem and Solution Informative Paragraph anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • “What Is School?” song (from Unit 1, Lesson 3; one to display

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Close Reading (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can answer questions using key details about the solution in ‘Protecting the Amazon’ from Off to Class.”

  • Show students the Our Study of School Word Wall card for solution. Say the word and show the picture.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What is a solution?” (an answer or way to fix a problem)

  • Discuss the definition on the card as a class.
  • Encourage students to turn to an elbow partner and use the word in a sentence. (Example: “I found a solution when _____.”)
  • Place the card and picture for solution on the Our Study of School Word Wall.
  • Tell students they will read closely the same section of informational text they read yesterday. Today, they will read to find out more about the solution the community of Xixuaú, Brazil, came up with.
  • Invite students to whisper an answer into their hands and ask:

“What is an informational text?” (a text to inform the reader with facts and definitions)

  • Focus students’ attention on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“Which of these did you do really well as a close reader yesterday?” (Responses will vary.)

“What will you work on doing better as a close reader today?” (Responses will vary.)

  • For ELLs: Review the meaning of the word research. Ask questions to recall prior knowledge:

“What topic did we ‘do research’ about yesterday?”

“What problems did you learn about in your research about schools?”

  • When introducing the word solution, maximize relevance by inviting students to describe a solution to a problem they have seen in your community. Ask:

“Yesterday you talked about how sometimes a problem in our community is that the library doesn’t have a copy of the book you want to check out. Can you think of a solution to that problem?” (Responses will vary) (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 2: “Protecting the Amazon” from Off to Class, Pages 12–13 (20 minutes)

  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Off to Class using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Off to Class (Session 2; for teacher reference). Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist during the close read-aloud (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Refer to the guide for the use of:
    • Off to Class
    • Off to Class notebook
    • How to Take Notes anchor chart
    • Sentence strip chunks
  • Show students the Our Study of School Word Wall card for solar panels. Remind them that solar panels soak up the sun’s energy and use it to make electricity.
  • Say: “What is the translation of solar panels in our home languages?” Call on a student volunteer to share. Ask other students to choose one translation to quietly repeat. Invite students to say their chosen translation out loud when you give the signal. Chorally repeat the translations and the word in English. Invite self- and peer correction of the pronunciation of the translations and the English.
  • Place the Word Wall card and picture for solar panels on the Our Study of School Word Wall.
  • At the end of Session 1, invite students to take a short break by placing their notebooks back at their workspaces and returning to their spot in the whole group area.
  • For ELLs: During the close read-aloud, provide sentence frames for Think-Pair-Shares. (Example: “In the village, there are no ______.”) (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: During the close read-aloud, display the text on a document camera or display an enlarged copy of the text to help direct students to the appropriate sentences on each page. (MMR)
  • As students prepare for the close read-aloud, provide options for physical action and sensory input by differentiating seating. Some students might benefit from sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs. (MMAE)

B. Independent Writing: Working with a Writing Partner (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to place their Off to Class notebooks in their lap or under their bottom while they listen.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can plan and share my writing with a writing partner.”

  • Direct students’ attention to the Writing Partners anchor chart and review it.
  • Ask and invite students to use a megaphone response (say it all together):

“What is one thing you will do with your writing partner?”

  • Transition students to sit next to their writing partner in their workspaces.
  • Invite students to open their Off to Class notebook to page 4 and put their pencil down.
  • Remind students that they have used their notebooks to take notes, and now they will use their notebooks to answer a question. This is different from taking notes, because now the ideas need to be in complete sentences.
  • Tell students that after you read the prompt aloud, they should turn and talk with their writing partners about what they will be listening for when you read the text aloud.
  • Remind students of their writing partner.
  • Read the prompt and question on page 4 of the Off to Class notebook:
    • “Listen as your teacher rereads the section ‘A Window to the World’ on page 13. Then answer the question below.”
    • “How does technology help students to learn in the village of Xixuaú? Use details from the text in your explanation.”
  • Invite students to turn to their writing partner to discuss what information they will be listening for.
  • Display page 13 of Off to Class. Read aloud the section that begins “In 2002, everything changed.”
  • Invite students to turn to their writing partner to discuss what they will write. After 30 seconds, cue students to allow the other partner to share his or her ideas.
  • Invite students to begin writing in their own notebooks. Circulate to support them as they write by rereading the prompt or parts of the text. Encourage students to use the resources in the room to help them with spelling (Word Walls, anchor charts, etc.).
  • When 3 minutes remain, ask students to wrap up their writing.
  • Refocus whole group.
  • Encourage students to share their work with their writing partner. Remind them to take turns listening to each other read their work aloud.
  • Invite students to give their writing partner a handshake or high-five for the work they have done.
  • For ELLs: Consider pairing students with a partner who has more advanced or native language proficiency. The partner with greater language proficiency can serve as a model in the pair, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames, for example. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Display the relevant pages of the notebook on a document camera or display an enlarged copy of it to help direct students to the appropriate pages and sections while providing instructions. Model and think aloud responding to a sample question. Provide sentence frames for students to support their thinking and writing. (Example: Technology helps students by _______. Also, _______.) (MMR)
  • Before students share their writing, create an accepting and supportive classroom climate by brainstorming ideas for how to give positive feedback to a writing partner. (Example: “Everyone is working very hard to do their best writing. After your writing partner shares his or her work with you, what is something you could say to acknowledge your partner’s writing efforts?” (I like how your words are resting neatly on the lines. I can see you included many details about how technology helped students. You did a great job with capitals and periods for every sentence.) (MME)

C. Analyzing a Model: Problem and Solution Informative Writing (15 minutes)

  • Transition students back to the whole group area.
  • Tell students that to understand how to write a problem and solution informative piece about what they have read, they will help you examine a model that has already been done for the school in Brazil.
  • Display the Problem and Solution Informative Writing Model: “The Rainforest School.”
  • Invite students to follow along, reading silently in their heads as you read it aloud.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What was this paragraph about?” (The rainforest school had no electricity but solved the problem by putting in solar panels, which enabled students to access the internet through computers.)

  • Tell students there are four parts to the problem and solution informative writing piece. Challenge them to find each part with a partner.
  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by giving an example:

“Can you give an example?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“Which sentences do you think make up the first part? What makes you think that?” (The first sentence is the first part. It talks about what will be written.)

  • Using a green marker, put a box around the sentence that begins “In a rainforest in Brazil.…”
  • Repeat this process with the second, third, and fourth parts of the model:
    • Use a yellow marker to box the second part: “The problem is that.…” “There was also no.…” (These sentences state the problem and give details about it.)
    • Use a blue marker to box the third part: “So they solved this problem.…” “The new school has.…” (These sentences state the solution and give details about it.)
    • Use a green marker to box the fourth part: “This is how the community.…” (This sentence reminds the reader what you have written about.)
  • Display the Parts of a Problem and Solution Informative Paragraph anchor chart.
  • Invite students to follow along, reading silently in their heads as you read it aloud. While reading, use a green marker to highlight or star the focus statement, a yellow marker for the information about the problem, a blue marker for information about the solution, and a green marker for the conclusion.
  • Tell students that as they begin to write their own problem and solution informative paragraphs in the next lesson, they should use the anchor chart to help them remember the parts of their writing.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Read the Problem and Solution Informative Writing Model aloud twice, each time framing and contextualizing the document, to provide additional opportunities to process and comprehend the language within. If necessary, pause to check for comprehension after each sentence. (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Use the respective colors for each sentence to annotate and illustrate the model with notes corresponding to each part. (MMR, MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Song and Movement: “What Is School?” Song (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to stand in their places.
  • Focus students’ attention on the “What Is School?” song and remind them that they sang this song in Unit 1.
  • Tell students that when they sing it together this time, you want to make sure they are singing loudly enough and clearly enough for others to hear.
  • Model singing the first line mumbled. Ask:

“Was that clear and loud enough for others to hear?” (No!)

  • Model singing the first line again in a clear voice and medium volume.
  • Invite students to sing the entire song along with you using the same clarity. Repeat if time allows.
  • For ELLs: Identify students who might be mouthing the words or not singing while the class sings chorally. If students seem to be avoiding singing, encourage them to sing without pressuring them. If students are comfortable, invite them to sing “duets” with more confident students so they can more easily hear themselves as they practice. (MMAE)
  • When discussing strategies for singing, provide options for perception by audio recording the class singing the “What Is School?” song and playing it back to the group. Allow students to identify strengths and things to work on when singing as a group. (MMR)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up