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ELA G1:M2:U3:L5

Speaking and Listening: Planning and Writing “What the Moon Sees” Poem and Introducing Peer Feedback

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.1.3: Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.5: With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.4: Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
  • L.1.1f: Use frequently occurring adjectives.
  • L.1.1j: Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2b: Use end punctuation for sentences.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can write a narrative poem using a model and evidence. (W.1.3, W.1.8, L.1.1f, L.1.1j, L.1.2b)
  • I can provide kind, helpful, and specific feedback to my classmates. (W.1.5, SL.1.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Refer to the Narrative Writing Rubric to track students’ progress toward W.1.3, W.1.8, L.1.1f, L.1.1j, and L.1.2b as they independently write during Work Time B (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Shared Reading: "What the Moon Sees" Poem, Verses 1 and 2 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Preparing for Writing: "What the Moon Sees" Verse Planner, Verse 3 (15 minutes)

B. Independent Writing: "What the Moon Sees" Poem, Verse 3 (10 minutes)

C. Launching Peer Critique (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson follows a similar pattern to Lesson 4, but with more student responsibility. Students engage in a shared reading of the “What the Moon Sees” class poem (verses 1 and 2), prepare for writing (using the verse planner), and then independently write verse 3 and the closing statement.
  • This lesson introduces giving and receiving feedback as students practice giving and receiving feedback that is kind, helpful, and specific about one another’s writing.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 4, students were introduced to the process of planning and writing the narrative poem “What the Moon Sees.” The process continues in this lesson, but students take more ownership.
  • Students continue working on the speaking and listening discussion norms from previous lessons as they practice giving and receiving supportive feedback.
  • Continue to use Goal 1­–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need additional support independently writing verse 3 of “What the Moon Sees.” Circulate during Work Time B and encourage them to use the classroom resources such as the verse planner, Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall, “What the Moon Sees” anchor chart, Time of Night anchor chart, Adjectives anchor chart, and verses 1 and 2 of the class poem.
  • The process of giving and receiving feedback was introduced in kindergarten but may be new to some students. The use of the feedback sentence starters will help all students frame their feedback in a kind, helpful, and supportive way. Consider strategically pairing students of varying language proficiency so that those with greater language proficiency can serve as a model for their partner.

Down the road:

  • During this lesson, students independently write “What the Moon Sees” verse 3 and the closing using their verse planner. The pattern of planning and writing is revisited during Lessons 8–10 as students synthesize their understanding of the sun and daytime to write their own narrative poems.
  • The process of giving and receiving feedback will be revisited throughout first grade. Consider providing more opportunities for students to practice giving and receiving kind, helpful, and specific feedback for all kinds of student work in many different subject areas.
  • Consider keeping student partnerships consistent over the course of Lessons 8–10 to maintain consistency while learning to meaningfully plan for writing.

In Advance

  • Distribute “What the Moon Sees” verse planners and “What the Moon Sees” poem verse 3 at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition to Work Time.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Create the Peer Feedback sentence starters in an online format such as Padlet to share with families.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.A.1, 1.I.A.2, 1.I.A.3, 1.I.C.10, 1.I.C.11, 1.I.C.12, 1.II.A.1, 1.II.A.2, 1.II.B.4, and 1.II.B.5

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing continued practice with a format for writing their own narrative poem. Students are invited to negotiate a plan for their Verse 3 of the poem with a partner, an ideal environment for language development.
  • ELLs may find peer feedback challenging. The process may conflict with home culture norms, where students are expected to receive feedback only from a teacher. Receiving and giving feedback with other students may be perceived as unproductive. Consider discussing with students and families the culturally bound value that peer feedback is an essential contributor to student learning and autonomy in this curriculum, acknowledging that teacher and parent feedback is equally valued.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Encourage students to add detail to their sentences by inserting adjectives or prepositional phrases. Example: The moon is rising up. > The shiny moon is rising up between the hills.

For heavier support:

  • Consider copying and cutting into strips some or all of the sentences from “What the Moon Sees” poem, Verse 2. Scramble them and invite students to resequence them into complete sentences, identifying in each the “main character” (subject) with the corresponding “what the main character does” (verb) or “more about the main character” (predicate).

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MME): During shared reading, support active information processing skills as students integrate new information with prior knowledge. Provide options for comprehension by linking to and activating relevant prior knowledge. (Example: Prior to reading, invite students to recall information from previous interactions with the text.)
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During shared reading, students are invited to read sentences aloud with you. Students may not feel confident in their reading skills and may benefit from modeling and supported practice. Provide differentiated mentors by seating students who may be more confident reading aloud near students who may not feel as confident.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During independent writing, some students may need examples of how to problem-solve when they want to write a word with tricky spelling. Emphasize sustained effort and process by modeling how to sound out a word with tricky spelling and demonstrate how to use environmental print to support spelling accuracy.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • closing, feedback (L)

Review:

  • evening, midnight, twilight, dusk

Materials

  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • “What the Moon Sees” poem (begun in Lesson 4; one to display)
  • “What the Moon Sees” verse planner (from Lesson 4; one per student and one to display)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Time of Night anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Adjectives anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 4)
  • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • “What the Moon Sees” poem verse 3 (one per student)
  • Peer Feedback sentence starters (one to display)
  • Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 2)
  • Narrative Writing Rubric (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Shared Reading: “What the Moon Sees” Poem, Verses 1 and 2 (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • “I can write a narrative poem using a model and evidence.”
  • Tell students that in a moment, they are going to read verses 1 and 2 of “What the Moon Sees” to refresh their memories and prepare for verse 3.
  • Direct students’ attention to the High-Quality Work anchor chart and reread the big ideas. Remind them that in the previous lesson, they analyzed these verses for evidence of high-quality writing.
  • Say: “As I read the poem today, I want you to look and listen for the parts that make this poem high quality. When you hear or see something, quietly put a thumb out in front of your chest.”
  • Invite students to quietly push the imaginary button on their brains to show they are ready to look and listen for high-quality writing in “What the Moon Sees.”
  • Display the “What the Moon Sees” poem and read it aloud.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What is something you saw or heard in the poem that let you know the poem is high quality?”

  • Select two to three students to share out the aspects of high-quality work they noticed.
  • For students who may need additional support with expressive skills: Consider offering the option for students to point to the evidence in the poem. (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Preparing for Writing: “What the Moon Sees” Verse Planner, Verse 3 (15 minutes)

  • Display the “What the Moon Sees” verse planner. Remind students that they took time to plan and write verse 2 together in Lesson 4. Now, they will plan verse 3 with a partner and then write verse 3 and the closing independently.
  • Explain that the closing is a sentence to end the poem. It should tell the reader that night is coming to an end.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“How can you say that night is ending in different ways?” (Night ends; The moon sets; Night is done; etc.)

  • Move students into pre-determined pairs and ask them to remain in the whole group gathering area.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner:

“What do you want to write in verse 3? Why?” (Answers will vary.)

  • Circulate and listen in as students discuss. As needed, remind them to show respect for one another’s ideas by listening intently and taking turns to speak.
  • Tell students that at their workspace they will find the “What the Moon Sees” verse planners from Lesson 4 and pencils.
  • Dismiss students to their workspace and invite them to complete the planner.
  • As students write, circulate and provide guidance by referring students to look at verses 1 and 2, the Time of Night anchor chart, the Adjectives anchor chart, the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall, etc.
  • Signal students to stop writing with the use of a designated sound. Tell them to keep their verse planners because they will use them next when they write verse 3 in complete sentences.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their ability to plan with a partner. (Example: “Patrick, I heard you and Julia respectfully come to an agreement about how to describe the moon by using the Adjectives anchor chart.”) Tell students that they are now going to write their own version of verse 3 independently.
  • To support self-regulation and independence when students transition from one activity to another, provide a clear routine for what to do with unfinished work and use a visual time timer. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Write and display student ideas for the closing.
  • For ELLs: Consider inviting students to discuss their ideas for the planner first in home language groups.
  • For ELLs: Jot down examples of successful communication as well as any language errors related to adjectives and taking notes to share with students at the end of Work Time B. Invite students to celebrate the successes and correct the errors.

B. Independent Writing: “What the Moon Sees” Poem, Verse 3 (10 minutes)

  • Display the “What the Moon Sees” poem and read verses 1 and 2 aloud.
  • Tell students that now they will write their own version of verse 3 and the closing independently on the “What the Moon Sees” poem verse 3.
  • Point out this material at their workspaces.
  • Answer clarifying questions and invite students to begin writing.
  • Circulate and support students at they write. When 2 minutes remain, provide them with a time reminder.
  • Signal students to stop writing with the use of a designated sound. Ask them to put away the verse planners in the designated area but to keep their “What the Moon Sees” poem verse 3 with them
  • For students who may need additional support recording their ideas in writing: Provide a partially filled-in or guided “What the Moon Sees” verse planner to help students know what to record. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Encourage students to color-code the verse planner and the corresponding phrases in their “What the Moon Sees,” Verse 3. For example, if their planner says “gibbous moon,” they can highlight it in red. In “What the Moon Sees,” Verse 3, they can write, “The gibbous moon disappears behind the hill,” highlighting in red “gibbous moon.”
  • For ELLs: To check for complete sentences, students can write a “C” above each “main character”/subject and a “D” above what each main character does. Invite students to make sure they have a “C” with a “D” in every complete sentence.
  • For ELLs: Ask students how their completed Verse 3 answers the planner questions.

C. Launching Peer Critique (15 minutes)

  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their ability to turn their ideas from the verse planner into complete sentences on the “What the Moon Sees” poem verse 3. (Example: “Ryan, you were able to take your idea that the moon saw a howling wolf and turn it into a complete sentence.”)
  • Invite students to bring their “What the Moon Sees” poem verse 3 and return to the whole group meeting area.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:
    • I can provide kind, helpful, and specific feedback to my classmates.
  • Tell students that they are now going to use the High-Quality Work anchor chart to provide feedback on a classmate’s writing.
  • Remind them that when you give feedback on someone’s work, you point out something they did well and something they might want to change or add to make their work even better.
  • Remind students that when giving feedback, it is important to be kind, helpful, and specific.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What does it mean to be kind, helpful, and specific?” (You say it in a nice way; you say something that will help the writer; you talk about a precise part.)

  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by giving an example and to listen carefully:

“Can you give an example?” (Responses will vary.)

“Who can repeat what your classmate said?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Display the Peer Feedback sentence starters and read them aloud. Tell students that these sentence frames are a way to ensure that the feedback they give is kind, helpful, and specific.
  • Display the High-Quality Work anchor chart and explain that students will focus their feedback on the big ideas of high-quality writing, including details and following conventions.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Pinky Partners protocol to provide feedback on their partners’ writing. Remind them that they used this protocol in Unit 2 and review as necessary using the Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol using their “What the Moon Sees” poem verse 3.
  • Circulate and listen in as students receive and give feedback on each other’s writing. As needed, remind them to be kind, specific, and helpful and to use the sentence starters.
  • Refocus whole group and invite students to return to their seats.
  • Collect students’ verse 3 to monitor progress toward W.1.3, W.1.8, L.1.1f, L.1.1j, and L.1.2b using the Narrative Writing Rubric.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback about giving feedback to each other. (Example: “Lia, I heard you give very kind, helpful, and specific feedback to Jin when you said that you think he should include another adjective to describe the moon.”)
  • For students who may need additional support with self-regulating taking turns or remembering their partner designation: Consider providing an index card with an A or a B and explain that partner A will share first, followed by partner B. (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider modeling peer feedback with an enthusiastic ELL, using think-aloud, the Peer Feedback sentence starters, and the High-Quality Work anchor chart.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Share that today students independently wrote verse 3 of “What the Moon Sees” and gave each other feedback on their writing, which is preparing them to write a complete poem, “What the Sun Sees.”
  • Remind students that the best learning happens when learners check to see how well they are doing and what they can do to be even better and tell students that now they are going to reflect on the feedback process.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What went well when giving and receiving feedback today?” (Responses will vary, but may include: We used the sentence starters to be kind, specific, and helpful; my partner gave me good advice to change ____ about my writing.”)

“What can we do differently to make giving and receiving feedback even better next time?” (Responses will vary, but may include: We could be more respectful when the other person is reading so we don’t interrupt each other; we could say two things we liked instead of just one.)

  • If productive, cue students with a challenge:

“What if we didn’t give feedback to one another on Verse 3? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • Give specific, positive feedback to students on their ability to respectfully give and receive kind, specific, and helpful feedback and tell them that they will continue to give and receive feedback as they begin writing a new poem about what the sun sees.
  • As students share, provide options for expression and communication by using sentence frames. Examples:
    • "It was helpful when my partner said ___.”
    • “Next time, we could be more helpful if we say ___.” (MMAE)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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