Unit 3 Assessment, Part III: Using Observations of the Sun to Write Narrative Poems | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA G1:M2:U3:L10

Unit 3 Assessment, Part III: Using Observations of the Sun to Write Narrative Poems

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.1.3: Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • L.1.1f: Use frequently occurring adjectives.
  • L.1.1j: Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2b: Use end punctuation for sentences.
  • SL.1.4: Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can write a narrative poem based on a model and using evidence. (W.1.3, W.1.8, L.1.1f, L.1.1j, L.1.2b)
  • I can provide kind, helpful, and specific feedback to my classmates. (W.1.5, SL.1.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • At the end of Work Times A and B, collect students’ “What the Sun Sees” verse planner and “What the Sun Sees” poem to serve as work samples demonstrating progress toward W.1.3, W.1.8, L.1.1f, L.1.1j, and L.1.2b.
  • During Work Time A, circulate as students discuss and plan their writing with a partner. Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to monitor progress toward SL.1.4 (see Assessment Overview and Resources). Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist again during Work Time C and the Closing as students participate in and debrief a peer feedback experience. 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Sun Movement Routine (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Preparing for Independent Writing: "What the Sun Sees" Poem, Verse 3 and Closing (15 minutes)

B. Unit 3 Assessment, Part III: "What the Sun Sees" Poem, Verse 3 and Closing (20 minutes)

C. Peer Feedback: "What the Sun Sees" Poem, Verse 3 and Closing (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This is the final lesson in a series of three in which students write a narrative poem. It follows a similar structure to Lessons 8–9. Students plan, write, and give feedback on verse 3 and the closing of their poem. This serves as the final part of the Unit 3 Assessment (W.1.3, W.1.8, L.1.1f, L.1.1j, L.1.2b).

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • During Work Time B, students revisit the “What the Moon Sees” example to analyze the closing sentence of the poem.
  • Similar to Lessons 8–9, during Work Time C, students give kind and specific feedback to their classmates based on the writing they have done during this lesson (W.1.5). This lesson’s feedback is specifically grounded in criteria from the High-Quality Work anchor chart.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need additional time to complete verse 3 of their narrative poem. Reallocate instructional time as necessary.
  • Some students may need additional support completing the independent writing portion of the Unit 3 Assessment. Consider providing those students with a written sentence frame for each verse: “It is _________. The ___________sun is _________. The sun sees __________.”
  • Some students may need additional support providing specific feedback during Work Time C. Consider providing and posting sentence frames for students to reference: “You did a good job of _______.” “I think you should _______.”

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 11, students will revise and edit their “What the Sun Sees” poem using feedback from the teacher. Prepare feedback for each student using the High-Quality Narrative Poem Checklist.
  • In Lesson 11, students will examine a teacher model and learn steps for revising and editing their own writing.
  • In Lesson 12, students will practice sharing their “What the Sun Sees” poems for the celebration of learning in Lesson 13.
  • In Lesson 13, students will share learning from all three units during the end of module celebration. Consider extending invitations to the principal, families, community members, and other teachers and their classes to attend.

In Advance

  • Distribute materials for Work Time B at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Review the Pinky Partners and Think-Pair-Share protocols. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, Sun Movement chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: If you recorded students participating in the Sun Movement routine in Unit 1, play this video to remind them of what to do.
  • Work Time C: If students were recorded during Work Time C in Lesson 9, consider replaying the recording to remind them of the process.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.C.10, 1.II.B.4

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by inviting them to complete assessment tasks similar to the classroom tasks completed in Lessons 4–6. Students use a planner like the one they used to plan for writing in those lessons and they also use familiar resources during the assessment (“What the Sun Sees” anchor chart, “What the Moon Sees” class poem, Adjectives anchor chart, Time of Day anchor chart, and Sky notebook).
  • Consider allowing time for students to review the entries they chose from their Sky notebook to describe the sun at different parts of the day as well as the language in the “What the Sun Sees” anchor chart, Adjectives anchor chart, and Time of Day anchor chart.
  • The assessment may be challenging for ELLs, because it is a big leap from the heavily scaffolded lessons. ELLs will be asked not only to independently apply writing skills developed throughout the unit, but to use resources as well.
  • Make sure ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supporting them with the writing skill being assessed. See additional support in the lesson.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Developing spellers will benefit from environmental support to sound out words in their writing. Some students may need explicit prompting to use environmental print when they cannot recall letter sounds or sight words. As you model writing, emphasize process and effort by modeling how to sound out a word with tricky spelling and demonstrate how to use environmental print.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): As students begin independent writing, vary methods for fine motor responses by offering options for drawing utensils (e.g., thick markers or colored pencils) and writing tools (e.g., fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards). Some students may forget their sentence ideas once they begin directing their efforts toward writing. Support strategy development by modeling how to physically touch the words/spaces on the sentence frame and draw lines for additional words you intend to write. This helps students recall their original ideas throughout the writing process.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Although holding high expectations is important, be aware that sometimes these expectations can raise student anxiety. During the assessment, emphasize the importance of process and effort by discussing how even when you try your best and give your best effort, you can sometimes get stuck as you think of what you want to write, and that is okay. Support development of problem-solving skills and sustained engagement by offering explicit scaffolding for what to do when you get stuck. (Example: “When I get stuck in my writing, sometimes I feel like I just want to rush or give up. But I can remember that I can take a deep breath and relax, then go back to my writing and give my best effort.”)

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

N/A

Materials

  • Sun Movement chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 2; one to display)
  • “What the Sun Sees” verse planner (begun in Lesson 8; added to during Work Time A; one per student)
  • “What the Moon Sees” example (from Lesson 7; one to display)
  • Sky notebook (completed in Unit 2; one per student)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Time of Day anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Adjectives anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 4)
  • What the Sun Sees anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • “What the Sun Sees” poem (begun in Lesson 8; added to during Work Time B; one per student)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Think-Pair-Share Protocol anchor chart (begin in Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Sun Movement Routine (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group area.
  • Remind students that throughout Unit 1, they learned a series of stretches and movements about the sun and moon to energize and activate their bodies. Tell them that today they will review and practice the steps of the Sun Movement routine in preparation for the end of module celebration.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Sun Movement chart and invite a student volunteer to lead the class through the routine.
  • Repeat the process with more student volunteers as time permits.
  • Tell students that in the next lesson, they will review and practice the Moon Movement routine.
  • Provide options for physical movement during the Sun Movement routine. (Example: Invite students to join in with movements as appropriate from a seated position.) (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Some students might not remember the steps of this routine from Unit 1. Before starting, briefly review some of the verbal directives involved in the Sun Movement routine and how they correspond to the Sun Movement chart before beginning the routine. (Example: “This is how you crouch down. Can someone show me what it looks like to crouch?”)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Preparing for Independent Writing: “What the Sun Sees” Poem, Verse 3 and Closing (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that during the past two lessons, they have written verses 1 and 2 of their poems. Today, they will work with the same partner to plan the third verse and closing.
  • Display the “What the Sun Sees” verse planner and focus students on page 3. Review each prompt question by reading them aloud.
  • Tell students that today they will not only discuss the prompt questions, but will also discuss ideas for the closing of their poem.
  • Display the “What the Moon Sees” example.
  • Move students into pairs and invite them to turn and talk:

“After closely examining the closing sentence of the poem, what ideas do you have for how to end your own poem?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Distribute Sky notebooks and “What the Sun Sees” verse planners.
  • Follow the same process used in Lessons 8–9 to guide students through planning their final verse and closing with their partner. Prompt them to use the following resources as necessary:
    • Time of Day anchor chart
    • Adjectives anchor chart
    • What the Sun Sees anchor chart
    • Pages in Sky notebooks that describe the sun at dusk
  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track students’ progress towards the targeted standard
  • After 5–7 minutes, refocus students whole group. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What time of day will your third verse be about?” (It’s going to be about dusk.)

“What does the sun ‘see’ at this time of day?” (The sun sees kids getting ready for bed.)

“What is an idea for your closing?” (Day is over, and the sun goes to sleep.

  • Transition students to their workspaces and invite them to begin completing their “What the Sun Sees” verse planner.
  • Circulate and support students as necessary.
  • When 1 minute remains, signal students to stop working through the use of a designated sound. Model cleanup, keeping directions clear and brief.
  • Tell students that they will use this verse planner as they begin to write the final verse and closing of their poem in the next part of the lesson.
  • For students who may need additional support recording their ideas in writing: Provide a partially filled-in or guided “What the Sun Sees” verse planner to help students know what to record. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Some students might be challenged to have to think on the spot about an idea for how they might end their poem. Support these students by providing time to process ideas orally. Example: “How can you say that day is ending in different ways?” (day ends; the sun sets; day is done; etc.)
  • For ELLs: To remind students of the resources available during the assessment, quickly review them by asking volunteers to name them, point to where they are in the room, and tell how each can help write Verse 3. (Example: “I can use the Adjectives anchor chart to find words to describe the sun in the morning, because that is what I am writing about.”)

B. Unit 3 Assessment, Part III: “What the Sun Sees” Poem, Verse 3 and Closing (20 minutes)

  • Display page 2 of the “What the Sun Sees” poem.
  • Remind students that in the previous lessons, they wrote verses 1 and 2 of their “What the Sun Sees” poem. Tell students that today they will write the final verse and closing of their poem.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“When we wrote our poem about the moon, what did you notice about the closing in the ‘What the Moon Sees’ poem?” (The poem doesn’t just end. The moon goes to sleep, and the sun comes up.)

“What do you need to remember as you write the closing?” (I need to make sure the poem feels complete. I need to think about what happens when the sun goes away.)

  • Follow the same process used in Lessons 8–9 to guide students through completing verse 3 and the closing at their workspaces. Circulate to support them as they work and refer them to their verse planners and the High-Quality Work anchor chart as necessary. 
  • To minimize distractions as students write independently, provide tools such as sound-canceling headphones or individual dividers. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider having students paraphrase what they need to do to meet the learning target. Make sure they understand what evidence they will use to write the poem.
  • For ELLs: If students can’t complete the work independently, consider providing students with a written sentence frame for the second verse: “It is _________. The ___________ sun is _________. The sun sees __________.” Allow time for students to grapple with completing this independent writing portion of the Unit 3 Assessment before providing the support. Grappling will help students build independence and offer an opportunity to assess what they are able to do independently.

C. Peer Feedback: “What the Sun Sees” Poem, Verse 3 and Closing (15 minutes)

  • Offer specific, positive feedback on students’ planning and writing processes. (Example: “I noticed that Jack took time to describe what the sun looked like at the evening time with descriptive adjectives. I also noticed that he wrote a closing that described what happens at the end of the day.”)
  • Tell the writers that today they will share verse 3 and the closing of their poem with a partner using the Pinky Partner protocol. Remind students that they used this protocol in Lessons 8–9 and review using the Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart as necessary. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol using the following sentence frames:
    • “You did a good job of _____________.”
    • “I think you should ________ because _________.”
  • Circulate as students share; prompt them to use the criteria on the High-Quality Work anchor chart when providing feedback. Take note of how students are interacting with one another using the Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • Refocus whole group and collect students’ poems. Share with students that you will spend time reading their poems and will provide kind, helpful, and specific feedback to each student to use during the next lesson.
  • For students who may need additional support with auditory processing: Display a checklist for peer feedback. Example:
  1. Be kind.
  2. Point out something specific.
  3. Suggest something your partner could change. (MMR)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group and offer students specific, positive feedback on their work providing feedback over the past several lessons to one another. (Example: “I heard Angel giving Damien specific feedback on his closing. He told Damien to describe what happens at the very end of the day.”)
  • Tell students they will again use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to reflect on how well they gave and received feedback in this lesson. Remind them that they used this protocol in many previous lessons and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“How did you do giving and receiving feedback?”

“What worked well?”

“What could you improve?”

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and target a few students to share out with the whole group. Document progress toward SL.1.4 using the Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • Refocus whole group and tell students that in the next lesson, they will have an opportunity to use the peer feedback from the past several lessons, as well as feedback from the teacher, as they revise and edit their poem.
  • To foster a sense of community and provide options for physical action after students have completed their work, invite the whole class to join you in a special applause (e.g., silent cheer, firecracker, hip-hip hooray, and high-five a classmate). (MMAE, MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider giving feedback on what an ELL student did well. This will help enable the student to identify and repeat his or her success next time.

Refer to the Assessment Overview and Resources for supporting materials for this lesson.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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