Focused Read Aloud and Retelling, Session 1: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA G1:M2:U1:L8

Focused Read Aloud and Retelling, Session 1: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.1.1: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.1.2: Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.
  • RL.1.3: Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
  • RL.1.7: Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.1.1b: Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
  • L.1.1e: Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
  • L.1.2a: Capitalize dates and names of people.
  • L.1.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because).

Daily Learning Target

I can answer questions about key details from Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. (RL.1.1, RL.1.2, RL.1.7, SL.1.1, SL.1.2)

I can describe the characters and setting from Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. (RL.1.3, RL.1.7, L.1.6, W.1.8)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the Opening, use the Language Checklist to track students’ progress towards L.1.1e as students participate in the song activity.
  • During the focused read-aloud in Work Time A, use the Reading Literature Checklist to track students’ progress toward RL.1.1, RL.1.2, RL.1.3, and RL.1.7 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to use words and phrases acquired through the read-aloud during the Role-Play protocol. Note how students are interacting with one another using the Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Song and Movement and Language: "Sun, Moon, and Stars" Version 2 song (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me (15 minutes)

B. Role-Play: Character and Setting, Pages 17–20 (10 minutes)

C. Independent Writing: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me Response Sheet, Parts I and II (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pinky Partners: Making Connections (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This is the first of two lessons in which students engage in a focused read-aloud of Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. Students use the text and illustrations to ask and answer questions about the characters, setting, and events in the story. Continue to reinforce the value of revisiting rich and complex texts many times to think about the important ideas and enjoy the beautiful language. 
  • Students complete a response sheet regarding Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me across Lessons 8–9. In Lesson 8, they focus on character and setting (Parts I and II of the response sheet).
  • This lesson introduces the Story Elements board as a visual aid, which is used during the focused read-alouds in Lessons 8–15 to track the characters, settings, and events of each story. Students work with each text over the course of two lessons. For each new text, the board is “wiped clean.” 
  • The pages of Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me are not numbered. For instructional purposes, the page that begins with “Before Monica went to bed she looked out of her window …” should be considered page 1 and all pages thereafter numbered accordingly.
  • If possible, give students access to the text, Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me by Eric Carle, during the K-2 Labs and K-2 Reading Foundations Skills Block.
  • ELLs benefit from having access to content in a home language. Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me is also available in Spanish. Consider making a copy available in the classroom to lend to families who speak Spanish.
  • Invite students to discuss myths and stories about the moon with their family and friends at home, and to then share what they learn with the class. Students can bring objects from home to enhance the sharing.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Throughout the first half of the unit, students frequently used the Think-Pair-Share protocol. Based on students’ familiarity with the protocol, its introduction has been shortened starting in this lesson. Continue to reinforce students’ understanding of this protocol as necessary.
  • This lesson builds upon the understanding of character and setting that was introduced with the Summer Sun Risin’ anchor chart in Lessons 3–7.
  • Throughout their work with Summer Sun Risin’, students participated in the Role-Play protocol. In Lesson 8, students continue to use this protocol to more closely understand the character and setting of Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Some students may need more support with their oral language during the role-play. Look for opportunities to support students’ oral language as they practice role-playing by providing sentence stems or modeled actions.
  • Support students in their transfer of oral rehearsal into their writing before and during Work Time C by referring back to the Story Elements board.
  • Students write independently for the Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me response sheet, Parts I and II. Have a plan in place for students who may need more support to complete this writing task. Consider using sentence stems, personal Word Walls, sight word lists, appropriate writing tools (pencil grips, slant boards), and other differentiated tools to aid students in independent writing.
  • The scientific term moon is defined in this lesson, and it is stated that the earth has one moon. It is likely that students will know that our planet has one moon. Help students understand that other planets also have moons, and that some planets have many moons. Encourage students to visit the Research Lab during Labs if they would like to discover more about moons.

Down the road:

  • Students will complete Part III of the Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me response sheet in Lesson 9.
  • Throughout this unit, students repeatedly return to texts to ask and answer questions about the characters, setting, events, and central message of the story. To scaffold students’ writing about the story elements, the response sheet prompts are broken into separate parts for each lesson. Students first focus on the characters and setting, then on retelling important events, and, for some texts, the central message.
  • In Lessons 14–15, students will complete the same response sheet for their Unit 1 Assessment, as they work with the text Kitten’s First Full Moon.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall cards for moon and night. Write or type the word on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
    • Story Elements board on a surface that can be “wiped clean” (e.g., white board, magnetic board, felt board, etc.) each time students begin a new text.
    • Story Elements board icons for character and setting (see supporting materials).
    • Parts I and II of the Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me response sheet on clipboards for Work Time C.
  • Review the Role-Play protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of this protocol.)
  • Strategically pair students for the Role-Play protocol in Work Time B. Consider pairing students with varying levels of language proficiency. The students with greater language proficiency can serve as models in their partnership, initiating discussion and providing implicit sentence frames.
  • Prepare writing materials (pencils) for ease of access in the whole group gathering area.
  • Post: Learning targets; Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall; “Sun, Moon, and Stars” Version 2 song; and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Record the whole group singing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” Version 2 song and post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app such as Seesaw for students to listen to at home with families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Create the Story Elements board in an online format—for example, a Google Doc—to display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards: 1.I.A.1, 1.I.B.5, 1.I.B.6, and 1.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing opportunities to deepen comprehension and expand oral language by acting out events of the text Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. Students will also have the opportunity to demonstrate understanding by writing in a structured organizer. 
  • ELLs may struggle with using verb tenses in Opening A. Consider using additional time to drill students on using the correct verb tenses by asking them to respond to different questions using the correct tense. (Examples: “What did you do yesterday? What do you see now?”) See Meeting Students’ Needs column for details.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During the focused read-aloud in Work Time A, add gestures and emphasis to key words such as stretched, long, very, high, and the figure of speech just the right size and invite students to copy the gesture as you say the word. This will help ELLs participate, internalize language, and engage with content.

For heavier support:

  • During the role-play in Work Time B, empower students to ask for help if they are not sure what their characters would say. Prompt students to call, “Line!” when they get stuck. Tell them this will signal their partners to provide them with an idea of something they could say.
  • During the Role-Play protocol in Work Time B, enlarge or project each corresponding page that is read aloud to students. Students may benefit from the additional visual cues.
  • During Work Time C, model doing quick sketches within the graphic organizer as placeholders for information. Say: “You can sketch first so that you don’t forget the information you want to add. Then you may go back later and write.”

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the focused read-aloud, students discuss character and setting in Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. Students were introduced to character and setting in Lessons 3–7 when reading Summer Sun Risin’. Some students may need additional support with connecting these story elements to a new book. Maximize generalization by reminding students that they have already learned about character and setting and prompt students make this text-to-text connection.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, individual students are asked to share ideas about what they imagine when they look at the night sky. Some students may need additional support connecting their own experience of the character Monica in Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. As students share out, provide options for expression and communication by using prompts and sentence frames.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During independent writing, students may need explicit examples of how to problem-solve when they want to write a word with tricky spelling. Emphasize process and effort by modeling how to sound out a word with tricky 

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • present tense, past tense (T)
  • proper noun, common noun, moon, night (L)

Review:

  • noun, verb, pronoun (T)
  • character, setting (L)

Materials

  • “Sun, Moon, and Stars” Version 2 song (from Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Language Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1; added to during the Opening)
  • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall cards (new; teacher-created; two)
  • Story Elements board (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
  • Reading Literature Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Story Elements Board Icons: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me (two; added to Story Elements board during Work Time A)
  • Story Elements Board: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Role-Play Protocol anchor chart (begun Lesson 4)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me response sheet (one for teacher modeling and one per student)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart (begun Module 1)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Song and Movement: “Sun, Moon, and Stars” Version 2 Song (10 minutes)

  • Direct students to sit in a circle in the whole group meeting area.
  • Display the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” Version 2 song.
  • Remind students that they have used this song to learn about nouns, verbs, and pronouns. With excitement, tell students that they can also use this poem to learn about the different tenses: past, present, and future!
  • Tell students that the poem is written in present tense and that present tense means that whatever is happening is going on right now.
  • Invite students to slowly sing the song aloud and pause at the noun and verb phrases. Think aloud:

 “When it says ‘I see’ or ‘the moon lights’ the song is describing what is happening in the moment. Not yesterday, and not tomorrow, but today!”

  • Turn and Talk:

“Use the present tense to say something you see today in the classroom.” (Responses will vary, but may include: “I see the computer. I see the teacher. I see my friends. Etc.”)

“Use the past tense to say something you saw yesterday in the classroom.”  Model as needed. (Responses will vary, but may include: “I saw the art teacher. I saw grey skies. I saw wet rain boots. Etc.”)

  • Circulate and listen in as students share with one another. Use the Language Checklist to track progress towards L.1.1e.
  • Tell students that they can play a fun game with the different tenses by changing the song to take place in the past or in the future. Tell students that they will try it today by singing the song as if they were singing about something that happened yesterday, or the past tense.
  • Model singing the song in the past tense:
    • “The sun shone over us all, I saw it sparkle like a ball…etc.”
  • Invite students to sing the song in the past tense with you.
  • Provide specific, positive feedback on their ability to change the song from the present tense to the past tense.
  • With excitement, tell students that in the next lesson they will change the song once again to future tense!
  • Cold call two to three students to share what they discussed with their partner. Encourage students to use the sentence stem “The song is telling us _________.”
  • Ask students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“How is the moon described in this song?” (The moon is described as rising up above the trees.)

  • Cold call two to three students to share what descriptions they heard. Encourage students to use the sentence stem “The moon is described as __________.”
  • Provide differentiated mentors by seating students who are less comfortable singing next to students who may be more comfortable. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: When cold calling, select one or two strong language models first so ELLs have a chance to hear the frame a few times in an authentic way from their peers.
  • For ELLs: Use the words yesterday and today to provide context when giving examples of using correct verb tenses. Provide a few non-examples and challenge students to notice when the sentence uses the incorrect verb tense. (Examples: “Yesterday, I see the art teacher. Does that sound right? How can I saw it correctly?”)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:
    • “I can answer questions about key details from Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.
    • "I can describe the characters and setting from Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.
  • Tell students that during the focused read-aloud today, they will read to meet these two targets.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Story Elements board and focus them on the labels “character” and “setting.” Read the labels aloud.
  • Tell students that during the read-aloud they will use the Story Elements board to track different elements of the story. Today, they will focus on character and setting. Use the Reading Literature Checklist to track their progress as students engage with the text.
  • Review the definitions of character and setting.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What is a character in a story?” (a person, animal, or object in a story, play, or movie)

“What is the setting in a story?” (when and where a story takes place)

  • Display Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.
  • Show students the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall card for moon and follow the same routine established in the Lesson 1: Provide its definition, use it in a sentence with an accompanying gesture, and place the Word Wall card and picture for it on the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall.
  • Show students the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall card for night and follow the same routine as above: Provide its definition, use it in a sentence with an accompanying gesture, and place the Word Wall card and picture for it on the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall.

“What is the translation of moon in our home languages?” (alqamar in Arabic)

  • Call on student volunteers to share. Ask other students to choose one translation in a home language other than their own to quietly repeat. Invite students to say their chosen translation out loud when you give the signal. Choral repeat the translations and the word in English. Invite self- and peer correction of the pronunciation of the translations and the English.
  • Invite students to act out something they do at night when the moon can be seen (sleep, read a bedtime story, etc.)
  • Read pages 1–4 slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Pause after reading page 4 and ask:

“Who are the characters in this story?” (Monica, Papa, and the moon)

  • Place the Story Elements Board Icon: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me for Monica on the Story Elements board (add Papa and the moon only if students have brought them up as a character). Refer to Story Elements Board: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Ask:

“When is this story taking place?” (at night)

“Where is this story taking place?” (outside the house)

    • Place the Story Elements board icon for outside at night on the board.
    • Draw students’ attention back to the text and read aloud pages 5–12 slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
    • Pause after reading page 12 to remind students that Papa and the moon are also characters in the story.
    • Place the Story Elements icons for Papa and the moon on the board (if not previously added).
    • Remind students that nouns are words that are people, places, or things, so the characters in a story are words that are nouns.
    • Tell students that nouns can be proper nouns or common nouns. A proper noun is a specific name and is always spelled with a capital letter like Ms. Adelia or San Jeronimo Bilingual School (insert your name and your school name). A common noun is a word used for general people, places, or things like girls, boys, and school.
    • Direct students’ attention back to the Story Elements icons for the characters. Using a total participation technique, ask:

“Which of these words are proper nouns?” (Monica and Papa)

“Which of these words are common nouns?” (moon)

“How do you know?” (Monica and Papa are names and spelled with a capital letter)

    • Circulate as students talk and use the Language Checklist to track students’ progress towards L.1.1b.
    • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What does the author tell us about Papa? How would you describe him?” (He works hard to get Monica the moon. He is kind, caring, generous, hardworking, etc.)

    • If productive, cue students to listen carefully and seek to understand:

“Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?” (Responses will vary.)

    • Draw students’ attention back to the text and read aloud the remainder of the book.
    • Remind students that they had identified the setting of this story to be outside of Monica’s house at night.
    • Display page 19. Show the illustration and allow students time to look closely.
    • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“How can you describe the setting by looking at this illustration for evidence?” (It is outside at nighttime. It is dark; there are stars. The sky is colorful; the moon is a sliver, etc.)

  • With excitement, give students specific, positive feedback on completing the character and setting portions of the Story Elements board for the very first time. (Example: “Naima used the Word Wall word night to help describe the setting of the story.”)

  • Tell them that in the next lesson they will use the Story Elements board again to help retell important events from this story.

  • As you discuss character and setting in Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me, maximize generalization by reminding students that they have already learned about these story elements in Summer Sun Risin’. Help students make this text-to-text connection by prompting them to share what they remember about character and setting in Summer Sun Risin’. Invite students to reflect on how this is similar to or different from character and setting in Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: To internalize, pronounce, and do pre-writing oral practice, briefly ask the class to say the words character and setting. Syllabicate them through call and response and use a hand gesture of a wave to put them back together. This will be helpful with the word evidence as well.
  • For ELLs: Students may describe Papa in terms like big, tall, and thin because they may be very familiar with the language of physical description. Prompt students to describe the characters’ personal attributes by asking about their actions. (Example: “What did Papa do? Was that a kind thing to do?”)

B. Role-Play: Character and Setting, Pages 17–20 (10 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and reread the second one aloud:
    • “I can describe the characters and setting from Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.”
  • Share with students that as in the previous lessons, they will get a chance to show what they know about the characters and setting of Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me using the Role-Play protocol.
  • Tell students that today they will think about, discuss, and role-play with a partner so they better understand character and setting in order to do their best writing.
  • Move students into pre-determined pairs and tell them they are going to use the Role-Play protocol to act out a section of Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. Remind them that they have been using this protocol in the last few lessons, and review as necessary using the Role-Play Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of this protocol.).
  • Invite students to begin the protocol for pages 17–20.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their ability to role-play the characters and setting of Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. (Example: “Devonte, you really showed Papa’s determination when you pretended to climb that very high ladder.”)
  • As students begin the partner role-play, highlight critical features of Summer Sun Risin’ by displaying specific pages on the document camera. Prompt students to refer to these pages for ideas about what to do or say as they role-play. (MMR) 

C. Independent Writing: Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me Response Sheet, Parts I and II (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and quickly review it.
  • Tell students that now they are going to continue to use these habits that help us learn to retell the key details of the story.
  • Share that now they are going to write what they know about the characters and setting in Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What is one attribute of the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart you will use today as you write?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Circulate and listen in as students share.
  • Cold call two to three students to share out.
  • Encourage students to continue showing the habits of effective learners for this lesson and all that they do.
  • Display the Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me response sheet.
  • Distribute prepared clipboards with response sheets and pencils.
  • Point out that this material has three parts, but they will complete only Parts I and II today.
  • Focus students on Part I and read the prompt aloud, allowing adequate think time:
    • “Who are the main characters?”
    • “Where does the story take place?”
  • Invite students to show a thumbs-up if they are ready to begin writing and drawing about the characters and setting from Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.
  • Tell students that they may begin writing their responses to Part I.
  • Circulate to support students as they write. Encourage them to use classroom resources (Story Elements board, Word Walls, high-frequency word lists, and alphabet or letter sound combination charts). If students need additional support generating ideas, invite them to work in a small group with teacher support and refer to the Story Elements board from Work Time A.
  • When 2 minutes remain, provide students with a time reminder and encourage them to finish up Part I. Signal all students to stop working through the use of a designated sound.
  • Focus students on Part II and read the prompt aloud, allowing adequate think time:

“Based on the pictures, which of these words best describes Papa?” Read four options aloud and model selecting one and circling it.

  • Tell students that there is more than one correct answer, so they should choose the one that makes sense to them.
  • Provide the following sentence frame:
    • “I think Papa is __________ because ________________________.”
  • Remind students that in the first blank they will write the descriptive word they circled above. In the second blank they will write why they think Papa is best described that way.
  • Invite students to show a thumbs-up if they are ready to begin writing about Papa from Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.
  • Tell students that they may begin writing their responses to Part II.
  • Circulate to support students as they write. Encourage them to use classroom resources (Story Elements board, Word Walls, high-frequency word lists, and alphabet or letter sound combination charts). If students need additional support generating ideas, invite them to work in a small group with teacher support and refer to the Story Elements board from Work Time A.
  • When 2 minutes remain, provide students with a time reminder and encourage them to finish up Part II. Signal all students to stop working through the use of a designated sound.
  • Collect students’ response sheets.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and give them specific, positive feedback for showing great initiative, collaboration, perseverance, and responsibility while tackling a new writing task. (Example: “Abdi, you showed great initiative when you raised your hand and asked me to reread the writing prompt.”)
  • As you prepare for independent writing, vary methods for fine motor responses by offering modified response sheets with a separate box for drawing and lines for writing. (MMAE)
  • Before the transition to clean up, support self-regulation and independence during the transition by providing a clear routine for what to do with unfinished work and using a visual timer. (MME)
  • After the Turn and Talk, emphasize process and effort in writing by modeling how to sound out a word with tricky spelling. Demonstrate how to use environmental print if students get stuck with spelling. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Provide a visual and gesture for the four adjectives in the characteristics word bank: tired (example: a picture of a sleepy face), sneaky, scared, and kind. Make language transparent by telling students these are adjectives, words we use to describe people, places, or things.
  • For ELLs: Before inviting students to complete Part 2 of the Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me response sheet, model and think aloud choosing an adjective from the word bank and providing a reason. (Example: “Hmm … I think Papa is sneaky. So what should I write here? That’s right, sneaky! Why is he sneaky?”)
  • For ELLs: Students may benefit from orally rehearsing their writing with peers. After introducing the sentence frame “I think Papa is _________ because __________,” encourage students to tell a partner their full sentence aloud. Circulate to support this interaction.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Pinky Partners: Making Connections (5 minutes)

  • Share that today students learned all about the characters and setting in Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. They learned how Monica was imaginative as she pretended she could play with the moon.
  • Tell students they will now share what they imagine about the night sky with a classmate using the Pinky Partners protocol. Remind them that they used the Pinky Partners protocol in Module 1 and review as necessary, using the Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of this protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol using the following question:

“In Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me, Monica imagined that she could play with the moon. What do you imagine when you look up at the night sky?”

  • Circulate and listen in as students share with their partner. Consider collecting data using the Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • Refocus whole group. Give students specific, positive feedback regarding their sharing. (Example: “Kaylee, I heard you sharing in a loud and proud voice. Andres, you used a complete sentence to share how you imagine traveling to outer space in a rocket ship.”)
  • As you circulate and listen in during the Pinky Partners protocol, scaffold partner conversations as needed. Some students may benefit from explicit prompting or a sentence frame. (Example: “When I look up at the night sky, I pretend the moon is a _______. I imagine _____ with the moon.”) (MMAE)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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