Performance Task: My Magnificent Thing: Editing and Reflecting | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA G1:M1:U3:L11

Performance Task: My Magnificent Thing: Editing and Reflecting

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • L.1.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can edit and publish my writing using the Revising and Editing Checklist for my magnificent thing description. (W.1.2, W.1.8, L.1.2)
  • I can reflect with my writing partner. (W.1.8)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Collect students' Magnificent Thing Writing booklets to gather evidence on students' mastery of writing standard W.1.2 and to inform instruction.
  • Circulate and observe how students are using the Revising and Editing Checklist to edit their writing.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Steps to Write My Magnificent Thing Description (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Editing: My Magnificent Thing Description (20 minutes)

B. Editing with My Writing Partner: My Magnificent Thing Description (15 minutes)

C. Reflecting with My Writing Partner: My Magnificent Thing Description (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pinky Partners: Sharing Our Writing (10 minutes) 

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: 

  • Students will share their published descriptions with families at their Magnificent Thing Celebration. Students' published pieces do not need to be conventionally accurate in every way. For example, it is acceptable if students use invented spelling and if their punctuation is not always accurate (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • In Work Time C, students take time to reflect on how they worked with their writing partners. Because writing partners is a structure that students will revisit, taking the time for students to debrief this during the lesson is important.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 10, students used the Revising and Editing Checklist to revise their writing. In this lesson, they use the checklist again, but this time to edit their writing.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Consider pulling a small group of students during Work Time A to support their use of an editing checklist.
  • Consider highlighting particular words from the High-Frequency Word Wall that many students are misspelling during Work Time A.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 12, students will be formally assessed on W.1.2. Lessons 8–11 provide time for students to practice this standard through intentional teaching of each substandard.

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display the editing examples (optional).
  • Write the sentence stem for Work Time C on a piece of chart paper: "You were a good writing partner because ____."
  • Review the Pinky Partners protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.) 
  • Post: Learning targets and Steps to Write My Magnificent Thing Description anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • None for this lesson 

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.C.10 and 1.II.A.1

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the use of modeling, graphic organizers and collaborative student work.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to stretch out words since their home languages may have phonemes that do not transfer to English directly. Work individually with students who have trouble stretching words and encourage them to use word walls and alphabet charts as necessary. If students mispronounce vowels, recast correctly and invite students to try again.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Invite an intermediate or advanced proficiency student to describe the difference between editing and revising. (Example: "When we revise, we make sure that our readers understand our ideas; when we edit, we make sure they can read our words.")

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time A, complete an additional round of edits as an interactive experience. Display a sample of a student's work or an additional model description. Call on students to identify errors and to complete edits based on the checklist.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students are asked to use a Revising and Editing Checklist to help keep track of the steps in their independent writing tasks. Embed support for decoding by including illustrations or images to go with each step.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During the Closing activity, students share a page of their writing they are proud of with a partner, Support the sharing process by circulating and listening in to what partners are saying. Some students may benefit from explicit prompting or sentence frames.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): In this lesson, students work with a writing partner to edit their writing in preparation for sharing their work with families. Optimize relevance by reminding students that they want their writing to be clear for their families or visitors to read and that their writing partners can help with this process. 

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • reflect (L) 

Materials

  • Steps to Write My Magnificent Thing Description anchor chart (begun in Lesson 8)
  • Revising and Editing Checklist (from Lesson 10; one per student)
  • My Magnificent Thing Description: Teacher Model (from Lesson 8; one to display)
  • Document camera (optional)
  • Classroom Tools and Materials anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Editing Example #1 (for teacher reference)
  • Magnificent Thing Writing booklet (from Lesson 8; one per student)
  • Editing Example #2 (for teacher reference)
  • Ways to Work with My Writing Partner anchor chart (from Lesson 9)
  • Sentence stem (written on chart paper; one to display)
  • Pinky Partners anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 2)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Steps to Write My Magnificent Thing Description (5 minutes) 

  • Gather students together whole group.
  • Directs their attention to the posted Steps to Write My Magnificent Thing Description anchor chart.
  • Tell students you are going to read each step aloud, and as you do, they should say "check" if it is a step that has been completed.
  • Read each step, inviting students to say "check" when appropriate.
  • Give students specific positive praise on the hard work they have done as writers. Invite them to do a silent applause with you. (Put your hands next to your ears with your fingers spread out. Wave them back and forth quickly.)
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Based on the Steps to Write My Magnificent Thing anchor chart, what do we need to do today as writers?” (edit our writing) 

  • For ELLs: For context and to enhance the feeling of accomplishment, display examples of student work for each step while completing the checklist.
  • As you review the steps, provide options for physical action by encouraging students to make a check mark in the air with their pointer finger when they say "check." (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Editing: My Magnificent Thing Description (20 minutes) 

  • Tell students they have worked hard to write their magnificent thing descriptions, and they are ready to edit and publish them! Remind students that editing is different from revising. Say: "When we edit things, we fix the writing so that other people can read it. This will be very important for the visitors who come to our room."
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • “I can edit and publish my writing using the Revising and Editing Checklist for my magnificent thing description.”
  • Explain to students that they have been revising their descriptions, and today they are going to use the Revising and Editing Checklist again to edit their descriptions for a few things in particular.
  • Display the Revising and Editing Checklist, and tell students that they will focus on three things today to edit their writing.
    • "I have spaces in between my words."
    • "I used charts around the room to help me spell words."
    • "I stretched out all my words and wrote all the sounds I heard."
  • Explain to students that first they will make sure they use charts around the room to help them spell words and stretch out all their words by saying the word slowly and listening for all the sounds they hear.
  • Tell students that you are going to show them how you would do this using My Magnificent Thing Description: Teacher Model.
    • Using a document camera, display the model.
    • Think aloud: "As I read each page out loud, I will stop at words that are tricky for me and ask myself, 'Is this word written on a chart or on the word wall? Or is it a word I need to make sure I've stretched out and written the sounds I hear?' Let me try this sentence here, 'I used mrkrs to col te papr."
    • Read the first part of the sentence aloud to students: "I used mrkrs."
    • Continue your think-aloud. Say: "Markers is a tricky word. Let me think: 'Is this a word that is around the room, or do I need to stretch it out?' I know this is the name of a tool, so I think this word is on our Tools and Work Word Wall. Let me look at the Tools and Work Word Wall, and make sure I've spelled this word correctly."
    • Direct students' attention to Classroom Tools and Materials anchor chart and point out the word marker. Cross out the word spelled incorrectly and write the correct spelling above it. See Editing Example #1 (for teacher reference).
    • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you notice I did to help me edit my writing?” (reread your writing slowly; stopped at tricky words; used the Classroom Tools and Materials anchor chart to help you spell the word; spelled the word correctly by crossing out the old word and writing it again with the proper spelling)

  • Transition students back to their seats.
  • Invite students to retrieve their Revising and Editing Checklists and begin editing their magnificent thing descriptions.
  • Circulate and support students as necessary.
  • After 10 minutes, invite students back to the whole group area.
  • For ELLs: Announce that if students still need to finish their writing, they may use the time to complete their descriptions. There will still be time for editing after it is completed.
  • As you prepare the Revising and Editing Checklist, embed support for decoding by including illustrations or images to go with each step. For example, include a picture of scissors with the alphabet chart to illustrate using charts to help with spelling. (MMR)

B. Editing with My Writing Partner: My Magnificent Thing Description (15 minutes) 

  • Using the document camera, display the Revising and Editing Checklist. Read the last three sentences aloud.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“According to the checklist, what do we still need to do to make sure our writing has been edited?” (make sure we have spaces between our words)

  • Tell students that they will work with their writing partners to make sure there are spaces between their words. They will read and show each page of their Magnificent Thing Writing booklets to their writing partner and then revise as necessary.
  • Explain to students that if there is a part that is harder to read because spaces are missing, they should tell their partner in a kind a way, so their partner can edit it.
  • Model for students to how to edit writing when there are spaces missing: Cross out the words and write them again on top with spaces between each word. See Editing Example #2 (for teacher reference).
  • Tell students they will read their entire magnificent thing description one more time to their writing partners and make sure there is a space between each word.
  • Invite students back to their seats to edit their writing with their writing partner.
  • For ELLs: Discuss the meaning of interacting with partners in a kind way. Prompt students to share some kind things to say in their home languages. Brainstorm or role-play different ways to give partners kind feedback. (Example: "Your writing is great, so I wish I could read this part. It is a little hard to read.") (MME)
  • As you talk about the importance of spaces between words, optimize relevance by reminding students that they want their writing to be clear for their families or visitors to read. (Example: "Having spaces between words will help families be able to read and understand your important ideas. Your writing partner can help you to get your writing ready for families by looking for places where you need spaces!") (MME) 

C. Reflecting with my Writing Partner: My Magnificent Thing Description (10 minutes) 

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Invite students back to the whole group area, and ask them to sit with their writing partner.
  • Explain that it is important to think about the things we do that make us better writers. Tell students that one thing they have done to make themselves better writers is working with their writing partners.
  • Direct students to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:
    • “I can reflect with my writing partner.”
  • Underline the word reflect. Tell students that today we are going to reflect, or think about, how their writing partners have helped them.
  • Display the Ways to Work with My Writing Partner anchor chart. Read the chart aloud with students.
  • Display the sentence stem: "You were a good writing partner because _____."
  • Invite students to think about how their writing partner was a good writing partner. Encourage them to use the Ways to Work with My Writing Partner anchor chart as needed.
  • After 2 minutes, prompt students to turn to their writing partners and share their completed sentences.
  • Once both students have shared, invite them to give each other a high-five and say, "Yay, writing partners!"
  • Tell students that they will continue to work with writing partners this year and learn about other ways that they can be good writing partners.
  • For ELLs: Brainstorm possible ways to complete the sentence starter before sharing with partners. Write the examples on the board and reread them. Tell students they may use one of the examples or they may use their own. (Examples: "You were a good partner because ... you listened to me; you had good ideas; you helped me.")

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Pinky Partners: Sharing Our Writing (10 minutes) 

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Invite students to look through their Magnificent Thing Writing booklet and choose one page that they are most proud of as a writer.
  • Tell students they are now going to use the Pinky Partners protocol to share the writing on that page with a classmate other than their writing partner. Remind students that they used this protocol in Lesson 9 and review as necessary, using the Pinky Partners anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Invite students to begin the protocol.
  • Once all students have made a tent with their arms, ask them to return to their seats.
  • Tell students that tomorrow they will get ready for their celebration. 
  • As students share a page of their writing with a partner, support the sharing process by circulating and listening in to what partners are saying. Some students may benefit from explicit prompting or sentence frames. (Example: "I am most proud of this page because _____.") (MMAE) 

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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