Introducing the Performance Task Prompt and Beginning a Visual Representation | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M4:U3:L4

Introducing the Performance Task Prompt and Beginning a Visual Representation

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.8.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can produce a visual representation of my position paper. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Performance task: visual representations 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing the Learning Target (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Introducing the Performance Task (15 minutes)

B. Producing a Visual Representation (23 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pair Share (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Continue working on your visual representation. 

  • In this lesson, you introduce the performance task. Encourage students to be creative and use the sample provided only as a guide. If your class has computers easily accessible, students may want to create their performance tasks on them; if not, have large paper and markers readily available.
  • In advance: Have markers and paper available for the performance task if the class does not have easy access to computers over the next few days.
  • Post: Learning target. 

Vocabulary

visual representation

Materials

  • Performance Task description (one per student)
  • Performance Task sample (one per student)
  • Chart paper
  • Effective Visual Representation anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Work Time A)
  • Photocopy of Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Draft Position Paper (one photocopy of each student's first draft, for them to reference during this lesson)
  • Computers (optional)
  • Markers (optional)
  • Chart paper (optional; one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing the Learning Target (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning target with you:

* "I can produce a visual representation of my position paper."

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

* "What is a visual representation? Can you think of any examples?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that a visual representation of their position speech would be the ideas in their speech presented visually rather than in writing--it includes images rather than a lot of text. For example, a poster is a visual representation.
  • Tell students that in this lesson they are going to begin working on their performance task, which is a visual representation of their position paper. Explain that a visual representation can make your main ideas easy to see and understand very quickly.
  • If necessary, encourage students to share, or you may provide some real life examples of visual representations. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing the Performance Task (15 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the document camera. Display and distribute the performance task description.
  • Read the performance task description and go over the planning page. Ask students if they have any clarifying questions and take time to answer them.
  • Display the performance task sample and explain to students that this is a suggestion of one way they could present their position paper ideas visually. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

* "So if we want to present our ideas visually so that people can see and understand our ideas quickly and easily, what do you think some criteria should be for this visual representation? Think about an informational poster--what makes an informational poster effective? Why?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Record students' ideas on a sheet of chart paper to create the Effective Visual Representation anchor chart. Ensure the following are included:

-    Claim is large and clear so people know what the visual representation is about

-    Clear lettering for reasons and evidence so they are easy to read

-    Colorful to catch people's attention and make it enjoyable to read

-    Eye-catching images that support the reasons and evidence

-    Not too cluttered--when things are too cluttered with color and images, it can be difficult to understand the ideas

  • Invite students to use their Photocopy of Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Draft Position Paper (one copy of each student's first draft) to plan their visual representation on the second page of their performance task description. Explain that they only need to choose two pieces of evidence for each reason they have provided in their position paper.
  • Circulate to support students as they work. Ask guiding questions:

* "Which of Michael Pollan's food chains did you choose in your position paper?"

* "What two reasons do you have for choosing that food chain?"

* "What evidence did you use to support your reasons?"

* "What counterclaim did you provide?"

* "What evidence did you use to argue against that counterclaim?"

* "What images would reflect those reasons and evidence?"

  • Invite students to share their plans with an elbow partner and to explain why they made those choices.

B. Producing a Visual Representation (23 minutes)

  • Invite students to begin working on producing their visual representation. This may be done on the computer or with markers and chart paper depending on the resources you have available.
  • Circulate to support students.
  • Consider posting these guiding questions for students to refer to while they work.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Pair Share (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to share their visual representations so far with a partner and to explain the reasons for their choices.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue working on your visual representation. 

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