End of Unit 2 Assessment: Presentation of Position | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M4:U2:L17

End of Unit 2 Assessment: Presentation of Position

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can present claims and findings in a focused, coherent manner (use relevant evidence, sound reasoning, and well-chosen details). (SL.8.4)
  • I can use effective speaking techniques (appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation). (SL.8.4)
  • I can integrate multimedia components and visual displays in a presentation to clarify information, strengthen claims, and add emphasis. (SL.8.5)
  • I can adapt my speech for a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when indicated or appropriate. (SL.8.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can present my claim about which food chain would best feed all the people in the United States using relevant evidence, sound reasoning, and well-chosen details.
  • I can adapt my speech for an audience of adults.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 2 Assessment: Position Speech

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mini Lesson: Adapting a Speech (10 minutes)

B. End of Unit 3 Assessment: Presenting Position Speeches and Adapting Speeches (30 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Partner Share (3 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish adapting your speech for an adult audience if you didn't finish it in the lesson.

  • In this lesson, students present their position speeches to answer the question: Which of Michael Pollan's four food chains would best feed the United States? Students present in their groups and you will circulate to each group, listening to each student present and assessing them using the Position Speech Rubric (for teacher reference). Please note that, depending on the size of your class, it may take more than one lesson to assess every student.
  • To address SL.8.6, while you are with one group listening to students presenting, the other students will be adapting their speeches for an adult audience, using more formal English. There is a mini lesson to address more formal language at the beginning of the lesson; however, students may need more time and examples than those given in order to successfully adapt their speeches for an adult audience. Adjust accordingly.
  • As you are assessing presentations, you do not need to assess the adapted speeches. Those will be collected at the end of the lesson for assessment against the final row of the rubric. Students may also need extra time to complete their adapted speeches, and may need to take them home to finish for homework. If possible--and time permitting--students should be given the opportunity to present their adapted speeches to complete the assessment of standard SL.8.6.
  • Students will need their Position Speech graphic organizers and their adapted position speeches in the next unit as they write their position papers.
  • Review: Position Speech Rubric ready to assess students as they present.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

adapt, formal

Materials

  • End of Unit 2 Assessment: Presentation of Position
  • Adapting a Speech anchor chart (new; teacher-created)
  • Formal and Informal Speech excerpt examples (one for display)
  • Position Speech Rubric (from Lesson 15)
  • Lined paper (one piece per student)
  • Position Speech Rubric (for teacher reference; enough copies to assess each student)

Opening

Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Read the learning targets aloud:

* "I can present my claim about which food chain would best feed all the people in the United States using relevant evidence, sound reasoning, and well-chosen details."

* "I can adapt my speech for an audience of adults."

  • Explain to students that today they will present their position speeches, and they are also going to adapt their speeches for a new audience of adults rather than students. Ask students to discuss in research teams:

* "What does adapt mean?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that it means to change the speech to make it more appropriate for an audience of adults rather than students.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Adapting a Speech (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that they are going to be presenting their position speeches in groups. Explain that you will be circulating to assess each group.
  • Review the prompt and steps for the End of Unit 2 Assessment: Position Speech: Which of Michael Pollan's four food chains would best feed the United States? first introduced in Lesson 15.
  • Focus students on the final step: Adapt your speech for an audience of adults. Tell students that while you are circulating to assess students, they are going to be rewriting their speeches to adapt them for a new audience of adults. Ask students to discuss in research teams:

* "Why do you think you might need to adapt your speech for an audience of adults rather than students? How might it be different?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that, when presenting to adults, they will want to be more formal in their use of language. Provide the example that you might greet a friend with, "Hi, how's it going?" But you would greet your teacher or a parent of a friend with, "Hello Mrs. ... How are you?"
  • Ask students to discuss in teams:

* "How can you make your speech more formal for adults?"

  • Cold call students to share their ideas. Record them on an Adapting a Speech anchor chart.
  • Display Formal and Informal Speech excerpt examples. Tell students that both of these speech examples say the same thing, but one is more formal and one is less formal. Tell them that you are going to read through both and listen for how one is more formal than the other.
  • Read both speeches aloud. Invite students to discuss in research teams:

* "How are the speeches different? Which one is more formal? How do you know?"

* "So what might some criteria be to make a speech more formal?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Record students' responses on the Adapting a Speech anchor chart. Ideas might include:

-    Avoid using contractions (e.g., instead of "don't," use "do not").

-    Avoid using slang (e.g., instead of "awesome," use "really good").

-    Use "yes" instead of "yeah."

-    Use more mature vocabulary (e.g., "wonderful" instead of "good"). 

B. End of Unit 3 Assessment: Presenting Position Speeches and Adapting Speeches (30 minutes)

  • Explain that you are going to circulate around research teams listening to each student present, and that while students are waiting for you, they are to adapt their speeches using more formal language for an adult audience.
  • Remind students of the Position Speech Rubric and invite them to reread the criteria to remind themselves of what will be expected of them as they present their speeches.
  • Distribute lined paper for students to adapt their speeches.
  • Circulate, going from one group to the next assessing each student as he/she presents his/her position speech. Use the Position Speech Rubric (for teacher reference). Note that you will not assess the adapted speeches during the lesson. This will be done afterward, so you can ignore the final row of the rubric during the presentations.
  • As they work on adapting their speeches, some students may benefit from an additional copy of their speech to highlight and annotate.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Partner Share (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to share their adapted speeches with a partner and to describe how they adapted their original speeches for an adult audience.
  • Collect in original speeches and adapted speeches to assess them. If students need more time to complete their adapted speeches, they may finish them for homework.
  • Partner sharing allows students to process the work they have done as they review their work together.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish adapting your speech for an adult audience if you didn't finish it in the lesson.

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