Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing Author’s Purpose in Speech and Text | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M4:U1:L7

Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing Author’s Purpose in Speech and Text

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze the purpose of information presented in different media and formats. (SL.8.2)
  • I can evaluate the motives behind a presentation. (SL.8.2)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.4)
  • I can use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede).
  • I can consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
  • I can verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

Supporting Targets

  • I can describe the purpose and motives of the speech by Birke Baehr and Michael Pollan on pages 73-75 of The Omnivore's Dilemma.
  • I can identify the conflicting evidence and viewpoints in pages 73-75 of The Omnivore's Dilemma and explain how Michael Pollan responds to them.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

 A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, Part 1: Listening to and Analyzing Speech by Birke Baehr (20 minutes)

B. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, Part 2: Analyzing an Excerpt from The Omnivore's Dilemma (18 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Comparing and Contrasting Speech and Text (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read Chapter 14 of The Omnivore's Dilemma and continue adding to your Food Chain graphic organizer for the local sustainable food chain.

  • In Part 1 of today's assessment, students listen to a speech by 11-year-old Birke Baehr and take notes.
  • Since Birke Baehr is a child, students likely will find his speech relevant and compelling. After listening to the speech, students complete the Author's Purpose graphic organizer they practiced in previous lessons in this unit.
  • In Part 2 of the assessment, students read a related short excerpt beginning at, "Can you eat more, please?" from pages 73-75 of The Omnivore's Dilemma and take notes. They complete the same Author's Purpose graphic organizer for this text.
  • The final activity in the Closing is not part of the assessment. This activity pushes student thinking further in comparing the speech and the excerpt of text, as the two are linked in content.
  • In advance:

-          Prepare the necessary technology to play Birke Baehr's speech: "What's Wrong with Our Food System?" (a TED Talk).

-          Create a blank Venn diagram titled "Industrial Food According to Baehr and Pollan" on chart paper or board (for a model Venn diagram, see Appendix).

  • After this lesson, assess student responses on the mid-unit 1 assessment using the NYS 2-Point Rubric--Short Response.

Vocabulary

purpose, motives, conflicting

Materials

  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author's and Speaker's Purpose Parts 1 and 2 (one per student)
  • Birke Baehr's speech: "What's Wrong with Our Food System?" (see teaching notes)
  • The Omnivore's Dilemma, Young Readers Edition (book; one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author's and Speaker's Purpose (answers, for teacher reference)
  • NYS 2-Point Rubric--Short-Response (for teacher reference)
  • Venn diagram: Industrial Food According to Baehr and Pollan (blank, with "Baehr" over left-hand circle and "Pollan" over right-hand circle)
  • Food Chain graphic organizer (from Lesson 6)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Remind students that they have been studying speakers' and authors' points of view, and how speakers and authors respond to conflicting viewpoints. They will be using these skills to complete today's assessment on author's purpose.
  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can describe the purpose and motives of the speech by Birke Baehr and Michael Pollan on pages 73-75 of The Omnivore's Dilemma."

* "I can identify the conflicting evidence and viewpoints in pages 73-75 of The Omnivore's Dilemma and explain how Michael Pollan responds to them."

  • Invite students to turn and talk to a partner about how they have been practicing these learning targets during the first half of this unit.
  • Ask students to show a thumbs-up if they feel confident about the targets, a thumb-sideways if they feel somewhat confident, or a thumbs-down if they do not feel confident. Clarify as needed.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Reviewing academic vocabulary words benefits all students developing academic language.  

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, Part 1: Listening to and Analyzing Speech by Birke Baehr (20 minutes)

  • Arrange student seating in an assessment-conducive formation to allow for independent listening, thinking, and writing. Remind students that they have already completed Author's Purpose graphic organizers for a text passage in an earlier lesson and for a speech in yesterday's lesson.
  • Inform students that they will be using the same graphic organizer for this assessment. Encourage students by telling them their hard work and practice with the author's purpose will serve them on this assessment.
  • Explain that they will first watch, listen to, and take notes on a speech titled "What's Wrong with Our Food System?", by an 11-year-old boy named Birke Baehr. Then they will read an excerpt from pages 73-75 of Omnivore's Dilemma. For both the speech and the text, they will complete an Author's Purpose organizer.
  • Distribute Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author's and Speaker's Purpose Parts 1 and 2. Read the instructions for the assessment aloud as students follow along silently. Address any clarifying questions.
  • Remind students that as this is an assessment, they are not to discuss their answers with other students--they are to work independently.
  • Invite students to begin listening as you play the Birke Baehr's speech: "What's Wrong with Our Food System?", reminding them to take notes about the gist in the box on the first page of the assessment. Once the speech has ended, ask students to wrap up their notes about the gist.
  • When students are ready, replay the video clip and instruct them to begin analyzing the author's purpose of the speech using the organizer on the second page of the assessment.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction during this study as well as the goals of the assessment.
  • For some students, this assessment may require more than the time allotted. Consider providing time over multiple days if necessary.

B. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, Part 2: Analyzing an Excerpt from The Omnivore's Dilemma (18 minutes)

  • Focus students on Part 2 of the assessment. Ask them to read pages 73-75 of The Omnivore's Dilemma beginning at: "Can you eat more please?" Remind them that they do not need to take notes for the gist and that they can refer to the excerpt of the text as much as necessary.
  • When they have finished reading the text, ask students to fill out the Author's Purpose section. Remind them again to look back at the text as needed.
  • Make sure students are aware that there is an additional conflicting Viewpoints and Evidence section in Part 2.
  • Collect both parts of students' mid-unit 1 assessment and assess using the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author's and Speaker's Purpose (answers, for teacher reference) and NYS 2-Point Rubric--Short-Response.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Venn Diagram: Comparing and Contrasting Speech and Text (5 minutes)

  • Display the Venn diagram: Industrial Food According to Baehr and Pollan. Remind students that information in a Venn diagram is organized in circles. Information inside the Baehr circle is unique to the speech. Information inside the Pollan circle is unique to text. Information in the middle section consists of similarities between both Baehr's speech and the excerpt from Pollan's book.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What information about industrial food was unique to Birke Baehr's speech?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Add students' comments to the left-hand side of the Venn diagram. Responses could include:

-       Corporations convince kids to eat things that aren't good for them/the environment.

-       Genetically modified seeds/organisms are "not intended by nature."

-       GMO food causes health problems.

-       Most of the food we eat has been genetically modified.

-       Most industrial farms use chemical fertilizers in soil, pesticides, and herbicides, which poison our water.

-       Food is irradiated to make it last longer.

-       We have a choice: Pay the farmer or pay the hospital.

-       Kids will eat more fresh food if they are more educated.

-       Think local, choose organic; know your farm, know your food.

  • Next, ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What information about food was unique to the excerpt from the text?" 

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Add students' comments to the right-hand side of the Venn diagram. Responses could include: 

-          The government helps pay for food corporations' raw materials.

-          Processing food makes people pay more for it.

-          Companies try to convince us their product is better.

-          Companies add nutrients to foods after taking them away.

-          Resistant starch fills up food without filling up the person.

  • Finally, ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* What information about food was in both the speech and the text?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Add students' comments to the center of the Venn diagram. Responses could include:

-          Food corporations profit at the expense of people's health.

-          Food corporations "add value" to food by making it attractive to consumers.

-          Food corporations are persuasive.

  • After completing the Venn diagram, tell students they've done some great noticing about the speech and the text. Give specific, positive feedback on comments that seemed particularly insightful. Tell students they will continue to study and use both speech and text to inform and persuade throughout the module.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning
  • When reviewing the graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all students, especially challenged learners.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 14 of The Omnivore's Dilemma and continue adding to your Food Chain graphic organizer for the local sustainable food chain.

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