Assessment Part 3: Advocating Persuasively in a Fishbowl | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M4:U1:L15

Assessment Part 3: Advocating Persuasively in a Fishbowl

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use my experiences and my knowledge of language and logic, as well as culture, to think analytically, address problems creatively, and advocate persuasively. (SL.8.2a)
  • I can use my experiences and my knowledge of language and logic, as well as culture, to think analytically, address problems creatively, and advocate persuasively. (RI.8.9a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can advocate persuasively for one of the four meals Michael Pollan introduces in The Omnivore's Dilemma.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part 3: Developing a Claim (from homework)
  • Advocating Persuasively Checklist Rubric

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part 3: Advocating Persuasively in a Fishbowl (35 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket: Which Meal Would You Choose to Feed Your Family? (8 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read "The Omnivore's Solution: Some Tips for Eating" on pages 287-290 of The Omnivore's Dilemma and answer this question:

* What three tips would you give to people about eating now that you have read most of The Omnivore's Dilemma?.

  • During this assessment, students advocate persuasively in a Fishbowl using the End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part 3: Developing a Claim they started in Lesson 14 and completed for homework.
  • Depending on the size of your group, you may need to conduct two or three Fishbowl discussions. You may also need longer than the time allocated; consider this when planning.
  • Assess each student advocating persuasively in the Fishbowl using the Advocating Persuasively Checklist Rubric (see supporting materials). This rubric is based on the Advocating Persuasively Checklist from Lesson 13.
  • As a celebration at the end of the unit, consider bringing in food students may not have tried before to sample from the meal choices .
  • In advance:
  • Plan the groupings for the Fishbowls. Group students to provide them with the opportunity to respond to a counter claim.
  • Post: Learning target.

Vocabulary

advocate, persuade, convince

Materials

  • The Omnivore's Dilemma, Young Readers Edition (book; one per student)
  • Fishbowl protocol (from Lesson 13)
  • Advocating Persuasively Checklist (from Lesson 13)
  • Advocating Persuasively Checklist Rubric (one per student)
  • Exit Ticket: Which Meal Would You Choose to Feed Your Family? Why? (one per student)
  • Homework: Tips for Eating (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (2 minutes)

  • Remind students that in the previous lesson and for homework, they made a claim on their End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part 3: Developing a Claim based on the question:

* "Now that you have read a lot of The Omnivore's Dilemma and know a lot more than you did in the beginning, which of the four meals you were invited to choose from at the beginning of the unit would you choose to feed your family? Why?"

  • Tell students that today, for the final part of their end of unit 1 assessment, they'll be assessed on their ability to advocate persuasively for their meal by participating in a Fishbowl, just as they practiced in Lesson 13.
  • Read the target aloud:

* "I can advocate persuasively for one of the four meals Michael Pollan introduces in The Omnivore's Dilemma."

  • Remind students that to advocate means to publicly support an idea and that to persuade means to convince an audience to take your viewpoint on an issue. 
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work Time

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part 3: Advocating Persuasively in a Fishbowl (35 minutes)

  • Remind students that they practiced advocating persuasively in a Fishbowl in Lesson 13.
  • Be sure students have their text, The Omnivore's DilemmaDisplay and review the Fishbowl protocol with students. Display and review the Advocating Persuasively Checklist. Remind them of the criteria you'll assess them against.
  • Remind students that they should refer to their End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part 3: Developing a Claim to advocate persuasively and that they should also be prepared to respond to a counterclaim by someone else in their Fishbowl discussion.
  • Begin Fishbowl 1. Organize the first group of students in the middle of the Fishbowl. The first student will not be able to respond to a counterclaim immediately because no one has gone before; after all students in the center have presented, ask the first student who presented to respond briefly to a counterclaim. All other students should respond to a counterclaim at the end of their presentations.
  • Rotate students into the center of the Fishbowl until all students have had a chance to present in the Fishbowl.
  • Repeat for Fishbowl Two and for as many fishbowls as you need for the size of your class.
  • As students advocate persuasively, assess each one against the Advocating Persuasively Checklist Rubric.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: Which Meal Would You Choose to Feed Your Family? (8 minutes)

  • Remind students that listening to other people advocate persuasively can sometimes make us change our minds. Ask them to think quietly for a minute about the following:

*"Did participating in and listening to other Fishbowls cause you to change your minds about your original claim of the meal you would choose?"

  • Distribute copies of the Exit Ticket: Which Meal Would You Choose to Feed Your Family? Why? and ask students to complete them.
  • Collect students' exit tickets. Thank students for their thoughtful participation in the Fishbowls.
  • End by telling students that in Unit 2 they will explore Michael Pollan's four food chains further by extending their research to resources away from The Omnivore's Dilemma book.
  • Distribute Homework: Tips for Eating.
  • Using exit tickets allows you to get a quick check for understanding of the learning target so instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs. 

Homework

Homework
  • Read "The Omnivore's Solution: Some Tips for Eating" on pages 287-290 of The Omnivore's Dilemma and answer this question:

* What three tips would you give to people about eating now that you have read most of The Omnivore's Dilemma?

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