End of Unit Assessment Parts 1 and 2: Evaluating Arguments and Claims | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G8:M4:U1:L14

End of Unit Assessment Parts 1 and 2: Evaluating Arguments and Claims

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine a speaker’s argument and specific claims. (SL.8.3)
  • I can evaluate the reasoning and evidence presented for soundness and relevance. (SL.8.3)
  • I can identify when irrelevant evidence is introduced. (SL.8.3)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)
  • I can evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text (assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims). (RI.8.8)
  • I can identify when irrelevant evidence is used. (RI.8.8)
  • I can use my experiences and my knowledge of language and logic, as well as culture, to think analytically, address problems creatively, and advocate persuasively. (RI.8.9a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can determine the speaker’s argument and claims and evaluate the reasoning and evidence she has used to support her claim in the interview clip.
  • I can identify irrelevant evidence that the speaker has used in the interview clip.
  • I can evaluate Michael Pollan’s argument on pages 73–75 of The Omnivore’s Dilemma for sound reasoning and sufficient, relevant evidence to support the claim.
  • I can identify irrelevant evidence.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 1: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in a Speech
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 2: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in an Excerpt of The Omnivore’s Dilemma

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Homework: Voting with Your Fork (3 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 1: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in a Speech (17 minutes)

B. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 2: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in an Excerpt from The Omnivore’s Dilemma (18 minutes) 

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Developing a Claim (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish filling in the End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 3: Developing a Claim and practice using it to advocate persuasively to be ready for the assessed Fishbowl discussion in the next lesson. Refer to the Advocating Persuasively Checklist filled in by your peer in Lesson 13 to help you improve the way you advocate persuasively. Remember to try to keep your presentation to about 1 minute.

  • In preparation for this assessment, make sure you’ve watched the video clip and read the excerpt from pages 73–75 of The Omnivore’s Dilemma.
  • The portion of the clip for Part 1 of the assessment is 0:36-3:00.
  • When Part 1 of the assessment is over, either collect the Part 1 graphic organizers from the students so they can focus on Part 2 OR allow them to have both so that they can use any additional time to finish up work on either part. This depends on your judgment of your students.
  • At the end of the lesson, students work on their claim in preparation for advocating persuasively in the final part of the end of unit 1 assessment in the next lesson. As students prepare their claim, circulate to determine which meal each student is advocating for so you know how to group students for the final assessment Fishbowls in Lesson 15.
  • Depending on the size of your class, group your students into two or three groups, and mix up the groups to have students advocating for different meals in each group so that they have counterclaims to respond to.
  • Assess student responses on the end of unit 1 assessment using the NYS 2-Point Rubric—Short Response.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

Do not preteach vocabulary in the assessment. 

Materials

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part 1: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in a Speech (one per student)
  • Organic Eggs vs. Conventional Farm Eggs, Free Range Chickens, & Ethical Animal Treatment Vital Farms” interview clip 0:36-3:00, and the technology to play it to the whole group
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part 2: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in an Excerpt of The Omnivore’s Dilemma (one per student)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 1: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in a Speech (answers, for teacher reference)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 2: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in an Excerpt of The Omnivore’s Dilemma (answers, for teacher reference)
  • The Omnivore’s Dilemma, Young Readers Edition (book; one per student)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 3: Developing a Claim (one per student)
  • Advocating Persuasively Checklist (filled in for students by peers in Lesson 13)
  • NYS 2-Point Rubric—Short Response (for teacher reference).

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Homework: Voting with Your Fork (3 minutes)

  • Remind students of their homework focus: Name one way you can you “vote with your fork.”
  • Select volunteers to share their ideas with the whole group.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework holds students accountable. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students aren’t completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Explain to students that today they will complete the first part of their end of unit assessment and that this assessment is directly related to the learning targets. Invite students to read the targets with you:

* “I can determine the speaker’s argument and claims and evaluate the reasoning and evidence she has used to support her claim in the interview clip.”

* “I can identify irrelevant evidence that the speaker has used in the interview clip.”

* “I can evaluate Michael Pollan’s argument on pages 73–75 of The Omnivore’s Dilemma for sound reasoning and sufficient, relevant evidence to support the claim.”

* “I can identify irrelevant evidence.”

  • Remind students that they have seen similar learning targets earlier in the unit when evaluating arguments and claims.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Reviewing academic vocabulary words benefits all students developing academic language.  

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 1: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in a Speech (17 minutes)

  • Tell students they are about to hear/watch an audio/video clip of someone being interviewed about organic eggs versus conventional farm eggs and that they are going to determine her argument and claims and evaluate the evidence and reasoning she has provided.
  • Distributethe End of Unit 1 Assessment, Part 1: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in a Speech .Give students 2 minutes to familiarize themselves with the organizer again. Make it clear that students will hear the excerpt multiple times, so they shouldn’t try to record everything at once.
  • Play the “Organic Eggs vs. Conventional Farm Eggs, Free Range Chickens, & Ethical Animal Treatment Vital Farms”interview clip once. Start at 0:36 and stop at 3:00.
  • Give students time to add any relevant information to their graphic organizers. Remind students they are to work independently without discussing their ideas.
  • Play the excerpt more times if students request it. Give students the rest of the time to finish completing the graphic organizer.
  • Circulate to support students, but as this is an assessment, they must complete this independently.
  • Collect Part 1 of the end of unit 1 assessment from students.
  • If students receive accommodations for the assessment, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment.
  • For some students, this assessment may require more than the time allotted. Consider providing students time over multiple days if necessary.

B. End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 2: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in an Excerpt from The Omnivore’s Dilemma (18 minutes)

  • Distribute the End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 2: Evaluating the Argument, Reasoning, and Evidence in an Excerpt from The Omnivore’s Dilemma.
  • Invite students to turn to pages 73–75 of The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Tell students they will be evaluating the argument, reasoning, and evidence in this excerpt of the book, just as they have done in previous lessons.
  • Remind them they are to work independently without speaking to any other students.
  • Circulate to support students, but as this is an assessment, they need to complete this independently.
  • Collect Part 2 of the end of unit 1 assessment from students.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Developing a Claim (5 minutes)

  • Tell students that in the next lesson they will participate in the second part of this end of unit assessment, which will involve advocating persuasively in a Fishbowl, just as they have done previously in the unit. Remind students that to help them prepare for this Fishbowl exercise, they need to develop their claim, reasons, and evidence.
  • Distribute End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 3: Developing a Claim. Invite students to read the question at the top of the organizer with you:

*“Now that you have read a lot of The Omnivore’s Dilemma, which of the four meals you were invited to choose from at the beginning of the unit would you choose to feed your family? Why?”

  • Make it clear that students do not have to choose the same meal they chose before, but they can if they want to. Remind them to use their Food Chain graphic organizers and evidence from The Omnivore’s Dilemma or any other documents in preparation for this claim. However, during the Fishbowl, they will only have access to this graphic organizer.
  • As students fill in their graphic organizers, circulate to get an idea of which meal each student is advocating for, as this will help with groupings in the next lesson.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish filling in the End of Unit 1 Assessment Part 3: Developing a Claim and practice using it to advocate persuasively to be ready for the assessed Fishbowl discussion in the next lesson. Refer to the Advocating Persuasively Checklist filled in by your peer in Lesson 13 to help you improve the way you advocate persuasively. Remember to try to keep your presentation to about 1 minute.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up