Advocating Persuasively in a Fishbowl: Practice | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M4:U1:L13

Advocating Persuasively in a Fishbowl: Practice

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use my experiences and my knowledge of language and logic, as well as culture, to think analytically, address problems creatively, and advocate persuasively. (SL.8.2a)
  • I can use my experiences and my knowledge of language and logic, as well as culture, to think analytically, address problems creatively, and advocate persuasively. (RI.8.9a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can advocate persuasively for either local sustainable or hunter-gatherer to feed my family.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Developing a Claim graphic organizer
  • Advocating Persuasively Checklist

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mini Lesson: How to Advocate Persuasively (8 minutes)

B. Students Prepare to Advocate Persuasively (8 minutes)

C. Practice Advocating Persuasively Fishbowls (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Peer Feedback (7 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read the Afterword, "Vote with Your Fork" (pages 279-283). Answer this: "Name one way you can 'vote with your fork.'"        

  • The Fishbowl in this lesson and the subsequent self-assessment prepare students for the end of unit assessment in Lesson 15, when they are graded on their ability to advocate persuasively in another Fishbowl.
  • Depending on the size of your group, you may need to conduct two or three Fishbowl discussions. You may also need longer than the time allocated; consider this when planning.
  • In this lesson, you will not be assessing students formally on the Advocating Persuasively Checklist. Instead make general notes about patterns you see across all of the Fishbowls to share with students at the end of the lesson.
  • Students will be peer critiquing during the Fishbowls; ensure they are familiar with the Peer Critique protocol. Set up the peer critiquing so students remember to be kind and constructive with their feedback.
  • In advance: Plan the groupings for the Fishbowls. Where possible, mix up the groups so that they contain students advocating for both food chains to provide students with the opportunity to respond to a counterclaim.
  • Post: Learning target.

Vocabulary

advocate, persuade, convince

Materials

  • Advocating Persuasively Criteria anchor chart (from Lesson 12)
  • Developing a Claim: Model (from Lesson 12)
  • Model Fishbowl Script (from Lesson 12)
  • Advocating Persuasively Checklist (one per student; one for display)
  • The Omnivore's Dilemma, Young Readers Edition (book; one per student)
  • Fishbowl protocol (one for display; see supporting materials)
  • Peer Critique protocol (one for display; see Appendix)
  • Homework: Vote with Your Fork (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (2 minutes)

  • Remind students that in the previous lesson, they made their own claim based on the question "Which food chain would you choose to feed your family--the local sustainable food chain or the hunter-gatherer food chain?" And for homework they completed the Developing a Claim graphic organizer with their main reasons and evidence.
  • Tell students that today they will practice advocating persuasively for their claim by participating in a Fishbowl.
  • Read the target aloud:

*"I can advocate persuasively for either local sustainable or hunter-gatherer to feed my family."

  • Remind students that to advocate means to publicly support an idea or cause and that to persuade means to convince an audience to take your viewpoint on an issue.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Reviewing academic vocabulary words benefits all students developing academic language.  

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: How to Advocate Persuasively (8 minutes)

  • Focus students' attention on the Advocating Persuasively Criteria anchor chart and remind them of the criteria they developed in Lesson 12.
  • Explain to students that these criteria are about the content, but when advocating persuasively, it is also important to consider the speaking skills involved.
  • Set up the Fishbowl situation again with a circle of about eight students on the inside and everyone else sitting on the outside.
  • Invite students to watch and listen carefully to your speaking skills. Repeat the model Fishbowl using the Developing a Claim: Model and the Model Fishbowl Script for guidance in outlining ideas, but try not to make it sound like you are reading a script, as students will focus on your speaking skills. As you model, make sure you speak loudly and clearly and make eye contact with students in the room.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What did you notice?"

* "What do you wonder?"

* "How did I advocate persuasively? How did I speak? What did I do?"

  • Add to the anchor chart:
    • Make eye contact with multiple audience members.
    • Speak clearly and slowly enough for everyone to hear and understand.
    • Use appropriate volume.
    • Speak respectfully and politely.
  • Display and distribute the Advocating Persuasively Checklist. Explain that you'll use this to assess students when they advocate persuasively in their Fishbowls and they'll also use it to assess each other. Invite students to read the criteria with you.
  • Modeling provides a clear vision of the expectation for students.
  • Anchor charts serve as note-catchers when the class is co-constructing ideas.

B. Students Prepare to Advocate Persuasively (8 minutes)

  • Tell students they have 10 minutes to prepare to advocate persuasively using their Developing a Claim graphic organizer. They may also use their text The Omnivore's DilemmaRemind them to refer to the criteria on the Advocating Persuasively Checklist, as this is what they will be assessed on. Tell them that their presentations need to be about 1 minute long.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially challenged learners.

C. Practice Advocating Persuasively Fishbowls (20 minutes)

  • Explain that students will use what they have just learned to practice advocating persuasively in a Fishbowl. Display the Fishbowl protocol and read it aloud with students.
  • Ask students to give a thumbs-up if they fully understand the protocol, a thumbs-sideways if they have a question about the protocol, or a thumbs-down if they have more than one question. Clarify where necessary.
  • Display the Peer Critique protocol and invite students to read it with you. Remind students to be kind and constructive in their feedback when peer assessing. Pair students with someone from another Fishbowl group. Tell them to write the name of their partner at the top of their Advocating Persuasively Checklist as they will be responsible for assessing their partner.
  • Begin Fishbowl 1. Organize the first group of students in the middle of the Fishbowl. Remind students of time as needed, keeping each presentation to about 1 minute. Remind students on the outside to assess their partner (in the center of the Fishbowl) on their Advocating Persuasively Checklist. After all students in the center have presented, ask the first group to respond briefly to their peers' claims, since they will not have had the chance to respond to another viewpoint.
  • Rotate students into the center of the Fishbowl until everyone has had a chance to present in the Fishbowl.
  • Provide general feedback; for example, patterns of success you noticed (stars), such as students' consistent use of eye contact within the group, or the clarity of their claims, relevancy of their evidence, etc. Comment on some areas of improvement (steps) as well, such as students' tendency to speak too quickly or quietly.
  • Thank students for their participation in the Fishbowls and their attention to the anchor chart throughout the process. Encourage students by telling them their practice will pay off during the upcoming end of unit assessment.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Peer Feedback (7 minutes)

  • Invite students to share their peer feedback with their partner using their Advocating Persuasively Checklist notes. Remind students to ask questions of each other where they don't understand the feedback their partner has given.
  • Distribute Homework: Vote with Your Fork.
  • Asking students to provide feedback to their peers based on explicit criteria helps students clarify the meaning of the learning target.   

Homework

Homework
  • Read the Afterword, "Vote with Your Fork" (pages 279-283). Answer this: "Name one way you can 'vote with your fork.'"

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