Making a Claim and Advocating Persuasively: Preparing for the Practice Fishbowl | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M4:U1:L12

Making a Claim and Advocating Persuasively: Preparing for the Practice Fishbowl

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use my experiences and my knowledge of language and logic, as well as culture, to think analytically, address problems creatively, and advocate persuasively. (SL.8.2a)
  • I can use my experiences and my knowledge of language and logic, as well as culture, to think analytically, address problems creatively, and advocate persuasively. (RI.8.9a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can develop a claim about which food chain I would choose to feed my family--local sustainable or hunter-gatherer--and support it with evidence.
  • I can advocate persuasively about my claim.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer for excerpt of Give (Frozen) Peas a Chance--and Carrots Too
  • Students' comments regarding how to develop a claim
  • Developing a Claim graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Review Homework: Evaluating an Argument Graphic Organizer for Excerpt of Give (Frozen) Peas a Chance--and Carrots Too by Dr. Mehmet Oz (7 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mini Lesson: Modeling Developing a Claim (13 minutes)

B. Independent Work: Developing a Claim to Answer the Question: "Which food chain would you choose to feed your family--the local sustainable food chain or the hunter-gatherer food chain?" (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Partner Share (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish your Developing a Claim ticket and be ready to advocate persuasively in the next lesson's Fishbowl.

  • This lesson introduces students to what it means to advocate persuasively and how to prepare to advocate persuasively by outlining a claim, points, and evidence. The lesson is designed to prepare students for a practice Fishbowl discussion and a Fishbowl assessment (Part 2 of the end of unit assessment). Note that this lesson addresses both RI and SL standards that NYS added to the CCLS. Both standards require the identical cognitive work for students.
  • At the beginning of the lesson, students share their homework. Student responses and the answers for teacher reference (see supporting materials) are used to fill in a blank graphic organizer with the class for students to check their thinking, receive feedback and clarification on their ideas, and make revisions.
  • The question used to model advocating persuasively is similar to the question students advocate persuasively about. The difference is that in the model, you make a claim, choosing between the industrial and organic food chains to feed your family; and when the students work independently, they will make a claim choosing between the local sustainable and hunter-gatherer food chains to best feed their families.
  • As students prepare their claim, circulate to determine which food chain each student advocates for so you can think about how to group students for the practice Fishbowls in the next lesson. Depending on the size of your class, you need to group your students into two or three groups, and mix up the groups to have students advocating for both food chains in each group to encourage listening to each other, to deepen their thinking and to make their own argument more thoughtful. It also ensures students have counterclaims to respond to.
  • In advance: Review the Developing a Claim: Model and the Model Fishbowl script to familiarize yourself with the claim you will use to model advocating persuasively and the way it should sound when you present it to the students.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

advocate, persuasively

Materials

  • Excerpt of Give (Frozen) Peas a Chance--and Carrots Too by Dr. Mehmet Oz (from Lesson 11)
  • Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer for excerpt of Give (Frozen) Peas a Chance--and Carrots Too by Dr. Mehmet Oz (one per student, from Lesson 11 and filled in for homework; one for display)
  • Equity stick Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer for excerpt of Give (Frozen) Peas a Chance--and Carrots Too by Dr. Mehmet Oz (answers, for teacher reference; see supporting materials)
  • Developing a Claim: Model (one for display)
  • Model Fishbowl Script (for teacher reference)
  • Advocating Persuasively Criteria anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Work Time A)
  • Developing a Claim (one per student)
  • The Omnivore's Dilemma, Young Readers Edition (book; one per student)
  • Developing a Claim: Sample Student Response (for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they read an Excerpt of Give (Frozen) Peas a Chance--and Carrots Too by Dr. Mehmet Oz and filled in the Evaluating an Argument Graphic Organizer for excerpt of Give (Frozen) Peas a Chance--and Carrots Too by Dr. Mehmet Oz.
  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share what they recorded on their graphic organizers. Fill out a new Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer for excerpt of Give (Frozen) Peas a Chance--and Carrots Too by Dr. Mehmet Oz, using student answers. Use the Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer for excerpt of Give (Frozen) Peas a Chance--and Carrots Too by Dr. Mehmet Oz (answers, for teacher reference) as a guide.
  • Invite students to revise their graphic organizers where they think necessary.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes students accountable for completing homework. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which children have not been completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Review the posted learning targets:

* "I can develop a claim about which food chain I would choose to feed my family--local sustainable or hunter-gatherer--and support it with evidence."

* "I can advocate persuasively about my claim."

  • Circle the word advocate. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What does advocate mean?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that to advocate means to publicly support an idea or cause. Record this definition above the word advocate.
  • Circle the word persuasive. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What does persuasive mean?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that to persuade means to convince an audience to take your viewpoint on an issue. Note that speakers persuade us with mostly with what they say, but how they say it is also important. Record this definition above the word persuasive.
  • Describe the end of unit assessment to students. Explain that it has two parts. In the first part, students evaluate an argument for a speech and another excerpt of The Omnivore's Dilemma using the graphic organizer with which they have been practicing. In the second part, they advocate persuasively about which food chain they would use to feed their family. They will develop their claim and supporting evidence in class in Lesson 14 and for homework, and then participate in a class discussion in the following lesson, where they advocate persuasively for their claim.
  • Tell students they have practiced evaluating arguments; today's lesson will help them prepare for the advocating persuasively section of the assessment.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Reviewing academic vocabulary words benefits all students developing academic language.  

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Modeling Developing a Claim (13 minutes)

  • Tell students that you are going to model how to advocate persuasively to answer the question. Make it clear that this is just an example of how to advocate persuasively and that students will answer a similar question, but not the same:

* Which food chain would you choose to feed your family, the industrial food chain or the industrial organic food chain?

  • Set up the Fishbowl situation with a circle of about eight students on the inside and everyone else sitting on the outside. Display the Developing a Claim: Model and explain that you used this ticket to organize your ideas and now you will use it to advocate persuasively. Refer to the Model Fishbowl Script for how to outline the ideas, but try not to make it sound like you are reading a script, as students will not be writing a script to read when they advocate persuasively. As you model, speak loudly and clearly and make eye contact with students in the room.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What did you notice?"

* "What do you wonder?"

* "How did I advocate persuasively? How did I try to make you think that I chose the best food chain?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas whole group.
  • Record student responses to the third question on Advocating Persuasively Criteria anchor chart. Ensure the following are included:
    • Made a claim.
    • Provide clear reasons for making that claim.
    • Provided strong supporting evidence for reasons from research.
    • Provided sound reasoning.
    • Responded to a claim made by someone else in the Fishbowl.
  • Remind students of their work on conflicting viewpoints in the first half of the unit. Explain that a counterclaim is like a conflicting viewpoint--which is a viewpoint that goes against another viewpoint. In the same way, a counterclaim is a claim that goes against another claim. In the Fishbowl model, you listened to the claims of others and argued against someone else's claim that was different from your own. Remind students of the counterclaim from the Fishbowl model.
  • Modeling provides a clear vision of the expectation for students.
  • Anchor charts serve as note-catchers when the class is co-constructing ideas.

B. Independent Work: Developing a Claim to Answer the Question: "Which food chain would you choose to feed your family--the local sustainable food chain or the hunter-gatherer food chain?" (15 minutes)

  • Distribute Developing a Claim and invite students to read the directions with you.
  • Refer to the displayed Developing a Claim: Model to help students determine what kind of information they need to record in each box as follows:
  • The claim is your answer to the question.
  • Reasons 1 and 2 are your main reasons for making your claim.
  • Evidence is taken from the book and supports your claim and your reasons for making the claim.
  • Explain that students will advocate persuasively in a practice Fishbowl in the next lesson, in which they will answer a similar question to the model "Which food chain would you choose to feed your family--the local sustainable food chain or the hunter-gatherer food chain?" They will use their Food Chain graphic organizers for the local sustainable and hunter-gatherer food chains, and the relevant sections of The Omnivore's Dilemma to support their claims and fill in the Developing a Claim ticket to help them in the Fishbowl.
  • Using the Fist to Five protocol, ask students to share how well they understand how to complete the Developing a Claim handout themselves. Notice students who hold up fewer than four fingers and concentrate on assisting them when the class begins to work.
  • Tell students that as this is a decision for their own family, they will do this independently; however, they can talk to other students if needed, as this isn't the assessment.
  • Circulate to assist students in making a claim, determining reasons, and finding evidence. Refer to the Developing a Claim: Sample Student Response for an example of a response. Ask students questions to guide their thinking:

* "Which food chain would you choose?"

* "Looking at what you know about both of the food chains, why would you choose that food chain? What two reasons can you give?"

* "What evidence can you find in the text to support your reasons?"

  • As you circulate, try to discern which of the food chains for which each student advocates, as this will help with groupings in the next lesson.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially challenged learners.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Partner Share (5 minutes)

  • Remind students of the criteria on the Advocating Persuasively Criteria anchor chart.
  • Invite students to pair up and verbally share their claim, reasons, and evidence.
  • Having students pair up with someone else to compare their work can help students gain a deeper understanding, learn from peers, and improve their own work.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish your Developing a Claim ticket and be ready to advocate persuasively in the next lesson's Fishbowl.

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