Preparation for Performance Task: Practicing Presentations | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U3:L7

Preparation for Performance Task: Practicing Presentations

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contacts, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. (SL.8.4)
  • I can demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can describe the photographs and civil rights song I have chosen using evidence from A Mighty Long Way.
  • I can present an argument for why the three photographs I have chosen are key events to drive the plot of a film about the experiences of The Little Rock Nine, citing evidence from A Mighty Long Way.
  • I can present an argument for why the song I have chosen is the best for a film soundtrack, citing evidence from A Mighty Long Way.
  • I can provide stars and steps to a peer about their presentation.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Peer feedback on Film Presentation Rubric

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

     A. Returning End of Unit Assessments with Feedback (7 minutes)

     B. Reviewing the Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

     A. Refining Presentations Using Feedback (1o minutes)

     B. Peer Feedback (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

     A. Making Final Revisions to Presentations (10 minutes)

4. Homework

     A. Practice your presentations to get ready for the Performance Task in the next lesson.

  • In Lesson 8, students will present to the rest of the class for the Performance Task. In today's lesson, they receive feedback on their End of Unit 3 Assessments in order to improve their presentations.
  • They also give and receive peer feedback. Prepare students for this by reminding them that the purpose of the feedback is to help them improve their work, so it needs to be kind and helpful.
  • In advance: Make sure End of Unit 3 Assessments have been graded and are ready to return to students with feedback.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

coherent, appropriate, adequate

Materials

  • End of Unit 3 Assessments (completed in Lesson 5; with teacher feedback; see Teaching Notes)
  • Prompt cards (students' own; from Lesson 6)
  • Film Presentation Rubric (two copies per student and one for display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Returning End of Unit Assessments with Feedback (7 minutes)

  • Return students' End of Unit 3 Assessments with your feedback. Provide some general comments about patterns that you noticed in students' writing. For example:

-   "I was pleased to see evidence from A Mighty Long Way used to support your arguments for choosing photographs and a song."

-   "I noticed that some people didn't explain why they chose some of the photographs--they only wrote a description."

  • Invite students to spend 3-5 minutes looking over your feedback and to consider how your feedback might change their presentations.
  • Invite students to share one thing with an elbow partner that they are going to focus on as they revise their presentations based on the feedback they have received.
  • Explain that if students have any questions about the feedback, they are to write their names in a list on the board and you will get to them at some point during the lesson.
  • Providing students with feedback on their end of unit assessments can enable them to improve their presentations.

B. Reviewing the Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

*   "I can describe the photographs and civil rights song I have chosen using evidence from A Mighty Long Way."

*   "I can present an argument for why the three photographs and civil rights song I have chosen are key events to drive the plot of a film about the experiences of The Little Rock Nine, citing evidence from A Mighty Long Way."

*   "I can present an argument for why the song I have chosen is the best for a film soundtrack, citing evidence from A Mighty Long Way."

*   "I can provide stars and steps to a peer about their presentation."

  • Remind students that in this lesson, they will continue to prepare for their presentations in the Performance Task in the next lesson. Explain that part of this preparation will involve working with another student to provide peer feedback.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Refining Presentations Using Feedback (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that they just received feedback on their End of Unit 3 Assessment that may have an impact on their presentations.
  • Tell students that they are going to have 10 minutes to use the teacher feedback to improve their prompt cards for their presentations. Explain that if they have a lot of suggestions for revisions in the teacher feedback, they should prioritize which they think most important in terms of improving their presentations.
  • Invite students to spend time using the feedback provided on their assessments to improve their prompt cards.
  • When they have finished revising their prompt cards, tell them to practice their presentations on their own in a space away from students who are still making revisions to their prompt cards.
  • While students are revising their presentations, circulate referring to students listed on the board who have questions about the feedback on their assessments.

B. Peer Feedback (15 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the Film Presentation Rubric. Invite volunteers to read each criterion aloud for the rest of the group.
  • Invite students to make notes on their rubric as you talk through some of the criteria with them. Underline "focused and coherent." Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "What does coherent mean?"

*   "If you present something in a focused and coherent manner, what does that mean?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that coherent means the argument is logical and makes sense. So to present in a focused and coherent manner means the speaker stays focused on the topic and the argument is logical and makes sense.
  • Underline appropriate. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "What does appropriate eye contact mean? What would be inappropriate eye contact?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that it means making eye contact with a few different people across the audience as you speak, and that inappropriate eye contact might be staring intently at one person the whole time, which might make them feel uncomfortable, or not making eye contact at all.
  •  Underline adequate. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "What does adequate volume mean? What would be inadequate volume?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that it means not too loud and not too quiet, and that inadequate might be too quiet to hear, or too loud so that it is too loud for the noise in the room. Explain that if students are not sure, they can always ask their audience whether or not the volume is suitable by checking that everyone can hear them.
  • Explain that you will be using these criteria to assess student presentations, so students will need to be thinking about each criterion as they present.
  • Pair students up.
  • Explain that students will use one of the copies of the rubric they have been given to provide peer feedback as they watch their partner's presentation.
  • Model how to fill out the rubric on the displayed copy. Explain that if a student is successfully achieving a standard, you will make a check in the middle column and write a star, a positive note--for example, when describing the volume a star might say, "Perfect volume. Very easy to hear." However, a step for the volume might be, "You started at a good volume but got quieter as you went on."
  • Explain that students should note at least one positive star and a step to work on when providing peer feedback. Remind students that the advice they provide should be kind and helpful so that it is useful and productively helps the other student improve his or her work.
  • Invite students to begin presenting in pairs.
  • Circulate to assist students in providing peer feedback on the rubric. Ask guiding questions such as the following:

*   "You check-marked that criteria. How did they achieve that? How can you express that as a star?"

*   "You didn't check that criteria. How could he/she have improved on their performance of that criteria?"

  • Invite students to share their feedback with their partner and to give them the completed rubric to refer to.
  • Asking students to provide peer feedback can enable them to not only help peers improve their work, but can also help them to build more of an understanding of what is expected of their own work to be able to improve it.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Making Final Revisions to Presentations (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to use the peer feedback they just received to make final improvements to their presentations.
  • Encourage students to spend the rest of the time practicing their presentations.

Homework

Homework
  • Practice your presentations to get ready for the Performance Task in the next lesson.

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