Preparation for Performance Task: Using Writing to Make Prompt Cards | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U3:L6

Preparation for Performance Task: Using Writing to Make Prompt Cards

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contacts, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. (SL.8.4)
  • I can demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use my writing as a basis for a presentation.
  • I can make prompt cards that key points I want to make in a presentation.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Prompt cards

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

     A. Reviewing the Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

     A. Analyzing Model Presentation Prompt Cards (15 minutes)

     B. Preparing Prompt Cards (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

     A. Sharing Prompt Cards (7 minutes)

4. Homework

     A. Use your prompt cards to begin practicing your presentation.

  • In this lesson, students turn the writing they completed for the End of Unit 3 Assessment into a presentation. To do so, students will need a copy of their End of Unit 3 Assessment writing. Make copies of their writing to return to them in this lesson.
  • Students watch a model presentation again in this lesson. You presented this model in Lesson 2. Use the same prompt cards to demonstrate to students how you used the model writing and the notes on the Photograph and Song Choice note-catcher (example, for teacher reference) to generate prompt cards.
  • In advance:
  • -   Copy students' End of Unit 3 Assessments (completed in Lesson 5).

    -   Prepare model presentation; see the Performance Task Model: Guidelines from Lesson 2.

    -   Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

prompt

Materials

  • Performance Task Prompt (from Lesson 2)
  • Little Rock Girl 1957 (book; one per student)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment Model Response (from Lesson 2)
  • Performance Task Criteria anchor chart (from Lesson 2)
  • Copies of students' End of Unit 3 Assessments (completed and collected in Lesson 5)
  • Highlighters (one per student)
  • Index cards (six per student)

Opening

Opening

A. Reviewing the Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

*   "I can use my writing as a basis for a presentation."

*   "I can make prompt cards that outline the key points I want to make in a presentation."

  • Tell students that today students will be using their writing from the End of Unit 3 Assessments to make prompt cards for their presentations. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "What is a prompt? So what are prompt cards?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that a prompt helps someone say something. It could be a question or a word. And prompt cards are cards containing questions or words to prompt a speaker. Clarify the difference between a prompt on a prompt card and a writing or assessment prompt by explain that this comes from the teacher for the purpose of focusing and guiding students' writing.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Model Presentation Prompt Cards (15 minutes)

  • Display the Performance Task Prompt and invite students to refer to their own copies. 
  • Ask students to reread the document silently to remind themselves of what is expected of them.
  • Have students take out Little Rock Girl 1957. Tell students that they will need to refer to this during the model presentation.
  • Repeat your model presentation as students observe. Use the Performance Task Model: Guidelines and the prompt cards that you prepared and used in Lesson 2.
  • Display the End of Unit 3 Assessment Model Response. Read it aloud for students.
  • Distribute the prompt cards that you used in the presentation. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "What information has been included on the prompt cards? Why?"

*   "How did these prompts help in the presentation?"

*   "What kind of information do you think you need to include on your prompt cards? Why?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to suggest the following ideas and record them on the board:

-   A card for each photograph and song choice

-   Key words, or very short, concise sentences they can read quickly without being distracted in the middle of the presentation

-   On each card, a prompt about the description

-   On each card, a prompt about the argument and reasons

  • Models help all students understand what is expected of their work.

B. Preparing Prompt Cards (20 minutes)

  • Focus students on the Performance Task Criteria anchor chart and remind them of the things they determined should be included in their presentations.
  • Next, refocus students on the displayed End of Unit 3 Assessment Model Response. Point out the highlighted sections of the model response. Explain that before you made prompt cards you went through and highlighted the key ideas that you wanted to make sure you discussed in your presentation and used those to help you design the prompt cards.
  • Distribute copies of students' End of Unit 3 Assessments and highlighters. Tell students that they now will highlight the key ideas in their writing that support the criteria.
  • Distribute index cards to each student. Explain that once they have highlighted the key ideas in their writing, they are to transfer those ideas into prompts for their prompt cards. There is one card per photograph, and one for the song, and an additional card for a conclusion.
  • Encourage students to refer to the criteria on the anchor chart, and the criteria they just generated on the board about prompt cards, as they work.
  • Circulate to support students as they work. Ask guiding questions:

*   "What is the most important idea in your description? Why?"

*   "Why have you highlighted this information? Why is this particularly important for you to communicate in your presentation?"

*   "What is the quick prompt you are giving yourself about the description of this photograph?"

*   "How could you make this prompt even shorter and quicker to read?"

  • Consider working with students who might struggle to write quick, concise prompts on their prompt cards.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Sharing Prompt Cards (7 minutes)

  • Invite students to take the highlighted copy of their End of Unit 3 Assessment and their prompt cards and to pair up with another student to share their prompt cards.
  • Encourage students to compare peer prompt cards against the criteria on the Performance Task anchor chart and the criteria for the prompt cards written on the board.
  • Invite students to make suggestions to help their partner improve their prompt cards.

Homework

Homework
  • Use your prompt cards to begin practicing your presentation.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up