Choosing Songs for the Film Soundtrack | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U3:L4

Choosing Songs for the Film Soundtrack

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contacts, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. (SL.8.4)
  • I can demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can select a song to use in the soundtrack for a film about the experiences of The Little Rock Nine as they went to Central High School.
  • I can cite evidence from A Mighty Long Way to support the reasons for my choice.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Photograph and Song Choice note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

     A. Reviewing the Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

     A. Analyzing and Selecting Songs (30 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

     A. Introducing the End of Unit 3 Assessment Prompt and Homework (12 minutes)

4. Homework

     A. Use your Photograph and Song Choice note-catcher to complete your Homework: Writing Plan

  • In this lesson, students continue the work on their performance task that they began in Lesson 2, this time choosing a song for the soundtrack of the film.
  • In order for students to choose a song, in this lesson they will need access to listen to the four songs they have been exposed to across the module: "A Change Is Gonna Come," "Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around," "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "This Little Light of Mine." Students will need to have at least 5 minutes to access each song. How you organize this depends on your technological resources. Consider having four "listening stations"--one for each song, with the songs cued up on internet devices for all students in the group to listen to. This may be one device on each station with the song playing on repeat through a speaker for all students in a group to hear, or it may be one device per student with students using headphones to control the sound level.
  • All four of the songs can be found by searching on free music or video streaming websites--for example, on YouTube.
  • As noted in previous lessons, YouTube, social media video sites, and other website links may incorporate inappropriate content via comment banks and ads. While some lessons include these links as the most efficient means to view content in preparation for the lesson, be sure to preview links, and/or use a filter service, such as SafeShare.tv.
  • In preparation for the End of Unit 3 Assessment (on-demand writing) in Lesson 5, students are introduced to the assessment prompt during this lesson and are given a writing planning sheet to complete for homework. Use your judgment based on your students' needs: You may feel that it would be better for students to complete their writing planning sheet in the classroom to be sure that students give this planning sufficient time for it to be meaningful.
  • Consider finding a way for students to share their book reviews with a wider audience at the school, such as posting them in the library or on an internal website, or including them in a school newsletter.
  • When student book reviews are collected, assess them for RL.8.11.
  • In advance:

-   Set up four listening stations--one song playing on each.

-   Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Performance Task Prompt (one per student and one for display from Lesson 2)
  • Journey to Justice note-catcher (completed by students across the module)
  • Four listening stations (see Teaching Notes)
  • Civil Rights Song note-catcher (one per student and one for display)
  • A Mighty Long Way (book; one per student)
  • Photograph and Song Choice note-catcher (from Lesson 2)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment Prompt (one per student and one for display)
  • Homework: Writing Plan (one per student and one for display)
  • Homework: Writing Plan (example, for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Reviewing the Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

*   "I can write a description of each of the photographs and the song I have selected for the film using evidence from A Mighty Long Way."

*   "I can argue why each photograph, and the song I have chosen deserves to be focused in the film using evidence from A Mighty Long Way."

  • Explain that today students will be using their Photograph and Song Choice note-catchers to respond to a prompt for their End of Unit 3 Assessments.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing and Selecting Songs (30 minutes)

  • Display the Performance Task Prompt and invite students to take out their own copies. Remind them that in Lesson 2 they chose the photographs and now in this lesson they need to choose the song for the soundtrack.
  • Remind students of the songs they have looked at so far in the module--"A Change Is Gonna Come," "Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around," "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "This Little Light of Mine."
  • Remind students to refer to their Journey to Justice note-catcher on which they have made already made links between three of the songs and A Mighty Long Way. Remind students that "Lift Every Voice and Sing" was a song they listened to and looked at for their End of Unit 1 Assessment.
  • Explain that you have set up four listening stations around the room (see Teaching Notes), and tell students that they are going to spend 5 minutes at each station listening to each song, listening to the lyrics and thinking about whether or not this would be the best choice for the soundtrack.
  • Display and distribute the Civil RightsSong note-catcher. Tell students that this is to help them remember each song and to take notes to help them make a decision at the end of the session. Remind them to refer to their text, A Mighty Long Way. 
  • Divide students into four groups and start each group at a different station. After 5 minutes, rotate students to the next station. Circulate to support students in filling out their note-catchers. Ask:

*   "What is this song about? How would you describe it?"

*   "What connections can you make between this song and A Mighty Long Way? What links did you make on your Journey to Justice note-catcher?"

  • Once students have been to all stations, invite them to take out their Photograph and Song Choice note-catcher and review the photographs they have chosen before using the song notes they took in this lesson to select a song for the film soundtrack. They are to record this song in the final box on their Photograph and Song Choice note-catcher.
  • Asking guiding questions can help students think through their responses and push their thinking further.
  • For students who may struggle to fill out the note-catcher, consider putting them in a single group and having that group circulate together with you. Provide them with additional support as they record their ideas.
  • If students are familiar with an additional song they think might be relevant, consider allowing them to pursue this, within reason.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing the End of Unit 3 Assessment Prompt and Homework (12 minutes)

  • Tell students that in the next lesson they are going to be doing an on-demand piece of writing for the End of Unit 3 Assessment. Display and distribute the End of Unit 3 Assessment Prompt.
  • Invite a volunteer to read it aloud as the rest of the group reads silently in their heads.
  • Invite students to ask any questions about what they are going to be expected to do for the assessment.
  • Display and distribute the Homework: Writing Plan. Tell students that although the writing for the End of Unit 3 Assessment is on-demand, you are going to give them time to think through the structure of their writing for the assessment.
  • Make it clear that students are not to write their response to the prompt on this planning sheet--this planning sheet is for them to plan the content of each paragraph.
  • Model an example on the displayed copy. See Homework: Writing Plan (example, for teacher reference) as a guide.
  • Remind students to use their Photograph and Song Choice note-catcher as they plan their writing.
  • Providing students with a model of how to fill out the Homework: Writing Plan shows all students what is expected of their work and what to aim for, and it provides them with the confidence to know where to begin.
  • Giving students planning time in advance helps them as writers.

Homework

Homework
  • Use your Photograph and Song Choice note-catcher to complete your Homework: Writing Plan.

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