Analyzing the Power of Different Mediums: A Mighty Long Way | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U2:L8

Analyzing the Power of Different Mediums: A Mighty Long Way

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present an idea. (RI.8.7)
  • I can gather relevant information from a variety of sources. (W.8.8)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use evidence from A Mighty Long Way to support my understanding of the text and build background knowledge of the civil rights movement.
  • I can understand the different mediums used to present an idea.
  • I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present information on the civil rights movement.

Ongoing Assessment

  • A Mighty Long Way structured notes, Chapter 9, pages 163-172 (from homework)
  • Analyzing Mediums graphic organizer
  • Journey to Justice note-catcher
  • Gathering Evidence note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Adding to the Journey to Justice Note-catcher (5 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Evaluating Advantages and Disadvantages of Video as a Medium (10 minutes)

     B.  Analyzing the Impact of the Press in A Mighty Long Way (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Debrief Learning Targets and Previewing Homework (4 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 4 in Little Rock Girl 1957 and complete the structured notes.

  • In the previous lessons, students have been introduced to and practiced the skill of analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (RI.8.7).  So far, students have analyzed the use of text, audio and photography. In this lesson, students continue their analysis, focusing on the medium of video. 
  • Students have been reading and analyzing A Mighty Long Way and Little Rock Girl 1957. Keep in mind that transitioning between texts may be difficult, especially for struggling learners. It is important to contextualize each new text for students, remaining transparent about why they are studying each one, and how it fits into the larger picture of the module.
  • This lesson provides time for students to collect evidence on their Gathering Evidence note-catcher about the possible illuminating and misleading roles the press can have in shaping stories of events.
  • In Work Time A students analyze the advantages and disadvantages of video recordings as a medium by viewing an archived video: "John Chancellor Reports on the Integration at Central High School." See Work Time A; if possible, you may want to extend the time so students watch the video twice.
  • In A Mighty Long Way Carlotta mentions the "print press." The print press played a large role in the events surrounding the Little Rock Nine, as did photography, television, and radio. Seek opportunities to tie the insights emerging about the press to the wider perspective of the role of all media in both reflecting and shaping public perspective by making connections to the reporting of current events and the use of different mediums, including the internet, to communicate ideas. 
  • In advance: Prepare the video: 1957: Showdown.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Journey to Justice note-catcher (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 3)
  • Analyzing Mediums graphic organizer (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Document camera
  • Digital projector
  • "John Chancellor Reports on the Integration at Central High School" (video; see Teaching Notes)
  • A Mighty Long Way (book; distributed in Unit 1, Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Gathering Evidence note-catcher (begun in Lesson 7)
  • Gathering Evidence Note-catcher Teacher's Guide (from Lesson 7)
  • Little Rock Girl 1957 Structured Notes, Chapter 4, pages 38-55 (one per student)
  • Little Rock Girl 1957 Supported Structured Notes, Chapter 4, pages 38-55 (optional; for students needing extra support)
  • Little Rock Girl 1957 Structured Notes Teacher's Guide, Chapter 4, pages 38-55 (for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Adding to the Journey to Justice Note-catcher (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to sit with their Kansas City discussion partners and retrieve theirStructured notes, A Mighty Long Way, Chapter 9, pages 163-172, from homework, and their Journey to Justice note-catcher (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 3).
  • Review with students that Chapter 9 documents some of Carlotta's senior year and her journey continues with rising militancy from segregationists.
  • Share with students that Carlotta is realizing a lot of new things about her society. Ask:

*   "What additional changes has Carlotta experienced?"

  • Invite students to work with their partners to add to stage 2, "Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around," of their Journey to Justice note-catchers using Chapters 8 and 9.
  • After a few minutes, cold call on student pairs to share the changes Carlotta is experiencing. Listen for students to add details like the lack of mobs as she enters school, how she still experiences bullying but it is a little less, the bombings of key locations by anti-integrationists, and her "rejection" from her top choice college because they think she needs a year off from all the stress.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which children have not been completing their homework.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • Read aloud the learning targets:

*   "I can use evidence from A Mighty Long Way to support my understanding of the text and build background knowledge of the civil rights movement."

*   "I can understand the different mediums used to present an idea."

*   "I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present information on the civil rights movement."

  • Invite students to turn and talk to their discussion partner in response to the question:

*   "What mediums have we analyzed so far?  What other mediums might we analyze today?"

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Evaluating Advantages and Disadvantages of Video as a Medium (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to have their Analyzing Mediums graphic organizers available to continue the work of the previous lessons. Display the graphic organizer with a document camera.
  • Explain to students that the book they have been reading, Little Rock Girl 1957, focuses on the power of a photograph to shape a story of the Little Rock Nine. In this lesson, they analyze the influence of video as well.
  • Remind students that during the civil rights movement, television news broadcasts were a very new medium for disseminating news to large audiences of people. In fact, black-and-white television was only just becoming a feature in most homes in the country. Explain to students that they are going to watch a clip from 1957 even though they have read ahead of this particular moment in the book by now.
  • Using the digital projector, show the video "John Chancellor Reports on the Integration at Central High School."  (You may wish to extend the time for Work Time A in order to show the video twice so that students really digest the images and sounds of the video).
  • Ask:

*   "What are some advantages of gathering information and gaining understanding of news events through video footage broadcast on television?"

  • Invite students to turn and talk with their discussion partners and then cold call a few pairs for their responses.
  • Listen for: "Video news is more up-to-date and immediate," "There is visual and audio input," "Video can have a personal and graphic impact on viewers," and "Video is highly engaging."
  • Ask:

*   "What are the disadvantages of gathering information and gaining understanding through video footage?"

  • Invite students to turn and talk with their discussion partners and then cold call a few pairs for their responses. 
  • Listen for:

-   "Video can be used to present misleading images,"

-   "The viewer doesn't really have freedom to choose what news to consume,"

-   "The information is presented in a condensed, time-limited way,"

-   "Going into real depth on an issue takes more than a few moments, so television is very limiting in this way," and "

-   The most dramatic moments are the ones that are captured--moments that are less dramatic, but super important, may not show up, so the reader/viewer has to be more thoughtful about what he or she is seeing."

  • Point out to students that John Chancellor even added his own opinion regarding when the black students would start attending classes after the removal of the Arkansas National Guard.
  • Direct students to add to their graphic organizers as you do the same on the projected copy.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief Learning Targets and Previewing Homework (4 minutes)

  • Read the learning targets aloud:

*   "I can use evidence from A Mighty Long Way to support my understanding of the text and build background knowledge of the civil rights movement."

*   "I can understand the different mediums used to present an idea."

*   "I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present information on the civil rights movement."

  • Ask students to imagine that they have gained national recognition for a heroic act. Ask them to vote between radio or video news broadcast to tell the story around the world.
  • Call on a volunteer from each position to explain their reasoning.
  • Tell students that they will return to Little Rock Girl 1957 and read Chapter 4.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Read Chapter 4 and complete Little Rock Girl 1957 structured notes, Chapter 4, pages 38-55.
  • Provide struggling learners with the supported structured notes for additional scaffolding as they read the memoir.

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