Close Reading: The Montgomery Bus Boycott Speech | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U2:L5

Close Reading: The Montgomery Bus Boycott Speech

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present an idea. (RI.8.7)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can analyze the connections between modern fiction and myths, traditional stories or religious works (themes, patterns of events, character types). (RL.8.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can understand different mediums and their advantages and disadvantages when presenting information.
  • I can use evidence from Dr. King's Montgomery Bus Boycott speech to support my understanding of the text and build background knowledge of the civil rights movement.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Little Rock Girl 1957 structured notes, Chapters 1-2, pages 4-27 (from Lesson 3 homework)
  • Answers to Montgomery Bus Boycott speech text-dependent questions

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Sharing Structured Notes (5 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

    A.  Close Reading: Montgomery Bus Boycott Speech (30 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Partner Share (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 3 of Little Rock Girl 1957 and complete the structured notes.

  • This is the second lesson in a three-lesson series that builds students' background knowledge about the civil rights era in U.S. history and helps them explore the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to convey a message. This is important preparation for the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment.
  • In this lesson, students continue to engage with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Montgomery Bus Boycott speech. Today's close reading supports students in understanding the key points of Dr. King's message so that they can focus on his methods for delivering this message in Lesson 6, when they will listen to the speech.
  • A Close Reading Guide is provided to support students as they work through this challenging text. The text is long and the questions require deep thinking on the part of the students. Thus, 30 minutes are allotted for this portion of the lesson.
  • Preview the Close Reading Guide. Based on the needs of your class, you may need more time. Consider adjusting the flow of lessons so that this close read extends over two class periods and build in more time for the whole class to discuss their responses to each text-dependent question before continuing on to the next one. 
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

iron feet of oppression, glittering July, alpine November, trampled

Materials

  • Little Rock Girl 1957 (book; distributed in Lesson 3; one per student)
  • Montgomery Bus Boycott speech (from Lesson 4)
  • Montgomery Bus Boycott speech (Excerpt Guidance and Gist) (from Lesson 4)
  • Montgomery Bus Boycott speech text-dependent questions (one per student)
  • Close Reading Guide: Montgomery Bus Boycott speech (for teacher reference)
  • Little Rock Girl 1957 Structured Notes, Chapter 3, pages 28-37 (one per student)
  • Little Rock Girl 1957 Supported Structured Notes, Chapter 3, pages 28-37 (optional; for students needing extra support)
  • Little Rock Girl 1957 Structured Notes Teacher's Guide, Chapter 3, pages 28-37 (for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Sharing Structured Notes (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to retrieve their Little Rock Girl 1957 structured notes, Chapters 1-2, pages 4-27 (from Lesson 3 homework) and their copies of Little Rock Girl 1957. Tell students you would like them to share their thoughts about the first two chapters of the book with their New York City discussion partner. Ask students to turn and talk:

*   "What did you think about the photographs you saw in the first two chapters? Point out one that made an impression on you and say why."

  • After allowing students to flip through the book and talk for a minute or two, invite them to share their responses to the focus questions on the structured notes:

*   "The photographs on pages 6 and 27 of Elizabeth Eckford heckled by Hazel Bryan shaped the world's perception of the integration of schools in Little Rock, Arkansas. What thoughts and emotions do you think they evoked in newspaper readers around the globe?"

*   "Based on what you've read in A Mighty Long Way and these two chapters in Little Rock Girl 1957, what were Governor Faubus' motivations for opposing the integration of schools in Little Rock?"

  • After students have shared their responses, ask them to turn and talk once more:

*   "On page 13 of Little Rock Girl 1957, the author describes a difference between Alabama, where Rosa Parks began the Montgomery bus boycott, and Little Rock. What is this difference and why is it important?"

  • Listen for students to talk about how Arkansas was not considered the "deep South," where racial tensions were much worse at the time. The author, Shelley Tougas, states that Little Rock was "known as a progressive small city," and "didn't seem an obvious battleground in the conflict over equal access to public schools" (13).
  • Call on one or two volunteers to share what they discussed. Emphasize that Rosa Parks' actions affected both those in her own state of Alabama and those in other states across the United States. Even though Arkansas was not considered the "deep South," racism and discrimination shaped the lives of the Little Rock Nine and so many other African Americans.

B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Read the first learning target aloud to students:

*   "I can understand different mediums and their advantages and disadvantages when presenting information."

  • Remind students that in the last lesson, they discussed and recorded the advantages and disadvantages of text and speeches in presenting information. Tell them that today they will continue to study the text of Dr. King's speech and in the next lesson they will get a chance to hear the text delivered in the form of a speech. They should continue to keep in mind how the text may compare to the speech.
  • Read the next learning target aloud to students:

*   "I can use evidence from Dr. King's Montgomery Bus Boycott speech to support my understanding of the text and build background knowledge of the civil rights movement."

  • Share with students that their close reading of the text today will help build a deeper understanding.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Reading: Montgomery Bus Boycott Speech (30 minutes)

  • Instruct students to take out the Montgomery Bus Boycott speech and Montgomery Bus Boycott speech (Excerpt Guidance and Gist).  Remind students that for homework, they reread the speech and defined important words and phrases. Tell students that their work reading the speech for gist in class yesterday and then rereading it for homework will help them as they complete a close reading of the text today.
  • Invite students to select two definitions from their homework to compare with a partner. Tell students they should select one word they are confident about and one word they are unsure about. Give students about 3 minutes to review their chosen words with a partner, adding to their own definitions as necessary. Circulate and clarify as needed.
  • Refocus whole group and ask what words and phrases were most difficult to define. Have students share some of their definitions, clarifying when needed.
  • Distribute the Montgomery Bus Boycott speech text-dependent questions. Remind students that key vocabulary words are defined at the end of each section of text in the form of footnotes, and the words they defined for homework should be listed in the "additional definitions" section on the right-hand side of the organizer. Invite students to refer to these notes when they hear a word they do not know as you read aloud.
  • Tell students you will now guide them through a close reading of the speech. Use the Close Reading Guide: Montgomery Bus Boycott speech to lead students through the text. Read the text aloud to students with dramatic expression, modeling fluency.
  • When students have completed the close reading, give specific positive feedback on the way they reread the text, reflected, wrote individually, and/or collaborated with their partners to gain a deeper understanding of the speech.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to visually display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • During this Work Time, you may want to pull a small group of students to support in finding evidence from the text. Some students will need more guided practice before they are ready for independent work.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Partner Share (3 minutes)

  • Thank students for their thoughtful participation and attention during the close reading. Tell them you will now give them a chance to anticipate the next lesson with a fun debriefing activity.
  • Ask students to go back to the text and choose a line from Dr. King's speech that they believe is particularly powerful. Explain that powerful could mean it struck them as important, evoked an emotion, or inspired an image or connection. Give students a moment to choose a line.
  • Next, instruct students to think about how they would deliver that line if they were asked to present it in a speech. What words would they emphasize? How would the use facial expressions or gestures? Tell students you will give them a moment to reflect on how they would deliver the line. Then, they will practice it with a partner.
  • Invite students to deliver their line to a partner, then switch. Encourage students to give one another feedback and deliver the line once or twice more.
  • Wrap up by telling students that they will study Dr. King's speaking techniques tomorrow.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Read Chapter 3 and complete Little Rock Girl 1957 structured notes, Chapter 3, pages 28-37.
  • Provide struggling learners with the supported structured notes for additional scaffolding as they read the novel.

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