End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Revising the Informational Essay | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U2:L20

End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Revising the Informational Essay

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to ensure that purpose and audience have been addressed. (W.8.5)
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.8.2c)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use feedback from others to revise, edit, and improve my essay.
  • I can use correct grammar and punctuation in my essay.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Writer: Reviewing Feedback on Essay Drafts (9 minutes)

     B.  Language Mini Lesson (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Complete Final Draft of Essay (30 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Previewing Homework (1 minute)

4. Homework

     A.  Finish revising and be prepared to turn in your final draft in the next lesson.

  • In this lesson, students revise and edit their End of Unit 2 Assessment based on your feedback.
  • In advance: Score student essays using the Content and Analysis and Command of Evidence rows on the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. Return the essay drafts with feedback in this lesson. Be sure to give feedback on the Coherence, Style, and Organization row and the Command of Conventions row of the rubric so students can make those revisions in this lesson.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

edit, revise

Materials

  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1: Best First Draft of an Informational Essay (from Lesson 17, returned in this lesson with teacher feedback)
  • Sticky notes (three per student; ideally three different colors)
  • A Mighty Long Way (book; distributed in Unit 1, Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Little Rock Girl 1957 (book; distributed in Lesson 3; one per student)
  • Computers
  • New York State Grade 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (from Lesson 16; for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Writer: Reviewing Feedback on Essay Drafts (9 minutes)

  • Write edit and revise on the board. Ask:

*   "What is the difference between revising and editing?"

  • Listen for students to say that revising is making changes to the essay's ideas, organization, evidence, etc., while editing is making changes to spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc. As students offer these ideas, list them on the board underneath the words "revise" and "edit."
  • Explain that students will work on both of these skills to improve their essays today. Distribute each student's End of Unit 2 Assessment: Best First Draft of an Informational Essay with teacher feedback and give each student three sticky notes.
  • Ask students to silently review the feedback on their first draft.
  • Post the following directions:
  1. On one sticky note, make a list of the top three things you must revise in your essay.
  2. On another sticky note, make a list of the top three things you must edit in your essay.
  3. On the last sticky note, write down any questions you have for me about your essay.
  • Stick the sticky notes to your desk so I can see them when I come around to help you.
  • Some students with disabilities or ELLs may need more scaffolding to revise and edit. Consider giving their feedback as a set of step-by-step instructions. For instance:

-   REVISE: Your essay is missing transitions. Add a transition sentence at the end of each paragraph that leads into the next paragraph.

-   EDIT: The circled words are misspelled. Get a dictionary and use it to correct the circled words.

  • EDIT: The underlined sentences are run-ons. Find them and correct them by adding a full stop and capitalizing the first letter of the new sentence.

B. Language Mini Lesson (5 minutes)

  • Remind students that they need to use both the active and passive voice in their essays.
  • Write these two sentences on the board:

-   Elizabeth Eckford was heckled by Hazel Bryan.

-   Hazel Bryan heckled Elizabeth Eckford.

  • Read each sentence aloud, asking students to follow along.
  • Ask students to look at the first sentence and think about who is emphasized more in it: Elizabeth or Hazel. Invite students to give a thumbs-up when they have an answer. Call on a student to share his or her thoughts. Listen for: "In the first sentence, Elizabeth is emphasized more because she is mentioned first."
  • Reread the second sentence: "Hazel Bryan heckled Elizabeth Eckford."
  • Once again, ask students to think about who is emphasized in that sentence and give a thumbs-up when they know. Call on a student to share. Listen for: "In the second sentence, Hazel is emphasized more because she is mentioned first."
  • Now ask students to turn and talk to identify which sentence is written in active voice and which is written in passive voice. After about 1 minute, cold call a pair. Listen for: "The first sentence is in the passive voice and the second sentence is in the active voice."
  • Remind students to keep the active and passive voice in mind; they will need to use them intentionally when they revise their essay. . While most of their essay will be in the active voice, at times they may use the passive when the "acted upon" is the more important in that particular sentence.
  • A sample language mini lesson has been provided; however, please address areas based on your feedback of students' first drafts of their essays. The time during Opening B has been allotted for this.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit Assessment, Part 2: Complete Final Draft of Essay (30 minutes)

  • Be sure students have their texts: A Mighty Long Way and Little Rock Girl 1957.
  • Tell students that they have the rest of the class period to work on revising and editing their essays. Explain that you will come around to check in with them as they work. Create a "Help List" on the whiteboard and invite students to add their names to it if they need more help. Remind students that their revision is due at the end of class today.
  • Revisit expectations for using computers.
  • Assign computers, and then prompt students to open their drafts and make revisions and edits.
  • While circulating, converse with students based on what they wrote on their sticky notes.
  • When a few minutes are left in Work Time, ask students to print or email their work to you.
  • Consider checking in first with students needing extra support to ensure they use their time well.
  • For students who need more time, consider focusing their revisions and edits on just one paragraph or just one section of the rubric.
  • Have independent activities ready for students who finish working early.
  • Consider extending the deadline for students who need extra processing or writing time; give them an opportunity to finish at home or come in after school to complete their revisions.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Previewing Homework (1 minute)

  • Congratulate students on their hard work, and remind them that this final draft marks the end of Unit 2. In Unit 3, students will continue to work toward crafting a vignette, which they began thinking about in Lessons 18 and 19.
  • Explain to students that they will need to complete the revisions they started in class for homework.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish revising and be prepared to turn in your final draft in the next lesson.

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