Language Analysis: “I Have a Dream” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U2:L13

Language Analysis: “I Have a Dream”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can intentionally use verbs in active and passive voice and in the conditional and subjunctive mood. (L.8.3)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.6.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can determine if sentences are in the active or passive voice.
  • I can analyze Dr. King's use of the active and passive voice in his "I Have a Dream" speech.
  • I can analyze how incidents in A Mighty Long Way propel the action and reveal aspects of Carlotta's character.

Ongoing Assessment

  • A Mighty Long Way structured notes, Chapter 13, pages 211-227 (from homework)
  • Language Analysis: "I Have a Dream"

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Sharing Structured Notes and Review Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Analyzing Language in "I Have a Dream" (27 minutes)

     B.  Carlotta's Journey to Justice (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Previewing Homework (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 14 in A Mighty Long Way and complete the structured notes.

  • This is the second lesson in a two-lesson sequence that focuses on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. In the previous lesson, students did a close reading of the speech to understand the central idea and some of the ways in which Dr. King uses figurative language.
  • Encourage students to make connections between A Mighty Long Way and King's "I Have a Dream" speech. The March on Washington, where King gave his speech, is mentioned in Chapter 13, which students read for homework in Lesson 12.  As students share their structured notes during Opening A, urge students to analyze Carlotta's reaction to King's speech.  
  • In this lesson, students focus particularly on Dr. King's use of the active and passive voice, which they first learned about in Lesson 6. This lesson builds on the skills that students developed as they analyzed the Montgomery Bus Boycott speech.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

active voice, passive voice

Materials

  • "I Have a Dream" speech (from Lesson 12)
  • Language Analysis: "I Have a Dream" (one per student and one for display)
  • Document camera
  • Language Analysis: "I Have a Dream" Teacher's Guide (one for the teacher)
  • Journey to Justice note-catcher (from Unit 1, Lesson 3)
  • A Mighty Long Way (book; distributed in Unit 1, Lesson 1; one per student)
  • A Mighty Long Way Structured Notes, Chapter 14, pages 228-238 (one per student)
  • A Mighty Long Way Supported Structured Notes, Chapter 14, pages 228-238 (optional; for students needing extra support)
  • A Mighty Long Way Structured Notes Teacher's Guide, Chapter 14, pages 228-238 (for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Sharing Structured Notes and Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to retrieve their A Mighty Long Way structured notes, Chapter 13, pages 211-227 from homework and sit with their New York City discussion partners.  Ask students to reread their responses to the focus question:

*   "On pages 223-224, Carlotta mentions several historical events including the March on Washington, where Dr. King gave his "I Have a Dream" speech; the bombing of the 16th Street Church in Birmingham, Alabama; and the assassination of President Kennedy. What are Carlotta's reactions to these events? What might account for Carlotta's different reactions to them?"

  • Invite students to discuss their responses with their partners.
  • Direct students' attention to posted learning targets. Read the first two learning targets aloud to the class:

*   "I can determine if sentences are in the active or passive voice."

*   "I can analyze Dr. King's use of the active and passive voice in his 'I Have a Dream' speech."

  • Ask students to predict what they will be doing in class today. 
  • Cold call on one or two students to respond and listen for them to say "We'll reread the 'I Have a Dream' speech and analyze how King used active and passive voice in it."

Work Time

Work Time

A. Analyzing Language in "I Have a Dream" (27 minutes)

  • Ask students to get out their copies of the "I Have a Dream" speech from Lesson 12. Remind students that they previously analyzed Dr. King's use of active and passive voice when the read his Montgomery bus boycott speech.
  • Ask:

*   "How can you tell if a sentence is in the active voice?"

  • Cold call on a student to respond. Listen for him or her to say something like: "Active voice means that the subject of the sentence is the one who is 'doing' the verb."
  • Ask:

*   "How can you tell if a sentence is in the passive voice?"

  • Cold call on another student. Listen for him or her to say something like: "You can tell if a sentence is in the passive voice if you add something like 'by a zombie' to it and the sentence makes sense."
  • Let students know that now they will have the opportunity to look for active and passive voice in "I Have a Dream" and analyze how it impacts the meaning of the speech.
  • Distribute Language Analysis: "I Have a Dream" and display it using a document camera.
  • Using the projected copy of Language Analysis: "I Have a Dream" to model how to do this analysis, using the first quote from "I Have a Dream."
  • When you model, be sure to model rereading the paragraph that the quote comes from, as well as how to determine if the voice is active or passive. Refer to the Language Analysis: "I Have a Dream" Teacher's Guide for sample responses.
  • Instruct students to continue to work with their New York City partners to analyze the language in the quotes that are identified in Language Analysis: "I Have a Dream."
  • As students are working, circulate and encourage students to reread paragraphs in the speech as they complete their analysis.
  • With about 5 minutes left in this Work Time, refocus the whole class. Cold call on students to share their responses. Listen for responses that are logical and rooted in the speech itself. Refer to the Language Analysis Teacher's Guide for sample responses. 
  • Share with students that they will be expected to include the active and passive voice when they write an informational essay at the end of this unit.
  • Invite students to put away their copies of "I Have a Dream" and Language Analysis: "I Have a Dream."

B. Carlotta's Journey to Justice (10 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the third learning target.

*   "I can analyze how incidents in A Mighty Long Way propel the action and reveal aspects of Carlotta's character."

  • Tell students to have their Journey to Justice note-catcher and A Mighty Long Way available so that they can add to stage 2 of their note-catchers based on Chapters 11, 12, and 13. Instruct students to work independently for the first 5 minutes to identify at least one event that has impacted Carlotta on her journey and add that event to their note-catchers. Encourage students to refer to the structured notes to help them identify important events.
  • As students work, circulate to ensure that everyone can find at least one event. Some events they might identify are:

-   Herbert's trial (Chapter 11);

-   Carlotta's graduation (Chapter 12);

-   Maceo's trial (Chapter 12);

-   Carlotta starting at Michigan State (Chapter 13);

-   Carlotta's trip to New York City (Chapter 13);

-   Carlotta's trip to Denver (Chapter 13);

-   The March on Washington (Chapter 13);

-   The bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church (Chapter 13);

-   President Kennedy's assassination (Chapter 13).

  • After 5 minutes, refocus the whole class. Cold call on students to share what they added to their note-catchers. Encourage all students to add to their note-catchers as their classmates share.
  • Prompt students to put away their note-catchers.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A.    Previewing Homework (3 minutes)

  • Distribute A Mighty Long Way structured notes, Chapter 14, pages 228-238 for homework.  Point out that students have two focus questions to answer for this chapter.
  • Remind students to use evidence from the text to support their responses to the focus questions.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Read Chapter 14, pages 228-238 in A Mighty Long Way and complete the structured notes.
  • Provide struggling learners with the supported structured notes for additional scaffolding as they read the memoir.

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