World Café: Analyzing the Jim Crow Laws | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U1:L9

World Café: Analyzing the Jim Crow Laws

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can analyze the connections and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events in a text. (RI.8.3)
  • I can express my own ideas during discussions. (SL.8.1)
  • I can build on others’ ideas during discussions. (SL.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can explain how the Plessy vs. Ferguson Supreme Court ruling codified the Jim Crow laws.
  • I can explain how the Plessy vs. Ferguson Supreme Court case connects to the Jim Crow laws.
  • I can use sentence starters to build on others’ ideas.

Ongoing Assessment

  • A Mighty Long Way structured notes, Chapter 4 (from Lesson 4)
  • Journey to Justice note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Structured Notes Focus Question from Chapter 4 and Journey to Justice Note-catcher (8 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Analyzing Jim Crow Laws (5 minutes)

     B.  World Café (30 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Previewing Homework (1 minute)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 5 and complete the structured notes.

  • A Mighty Long Way structured notes, Chapter 4 (from Lesson 4)
  • Journey to Justice note-catcher (from Lesson 3)
  • Introduction to the Jim Crow Laws (one per student and one for display)
  • Document camera
  • World Café protocol (one to display; see Appendix)
  • World Café note-catcher (one per student)
  • Jim Crow Laws strips (one category per table, cut into strips)
  • Sentence starters (one per table)
  • Plessy v. Ferguson: Key Excerpts from the Court’s Decision (from Lesson 5)
  • A Mighty Long Way (book, one per student)
  • QuickWrite #1 (one per student)
  • A Mighty Long Way structured notes, Chapter 5, pages 82–98 (one per student)
  • A Mighty Long Way supported structured notes, Chapter 5, pages 82–98 (optional; for students who need extra support)
  • A Mighty Long Way Structured Notes Teacher’s Guide, Chapter 5, pages 82–98 (for teacher reference)

Vocabulary

codified, consorting, naiveté

Materials

  • Journey to Justice note-catcher (from Lesson 3)
  • Introduction to the Jim Crow Laws (one per student and one for display)
  • Document camera
  • World Café protocol (one to display; see Appendix)
  • World Café note-catcher (one per student)
  • Jim Crow Laws strips (one category per table, cut into strips)
  • Sentence starters (one per table)
  • QuickWrite #1 (one per student)
  • A Mighty Long Way Structured Notes, Chapter 5, pages 82–98 (one per student)
  • A Mighty Long Way Supported Structured Notes, Chapter 5, pages 82–98 (optional; for students who need extra support)
  • A Mighty Long Way Structured Notes Teacher’s Guide, Chapter 5, pages 82–98 (for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Structured Notes Focus Question from Chapter 4 and Journey to Justice Note-catcher (8 minutes)

  • Ask students to sit with their Chicago Discussion Appointment partner and take out their A Mighty Long Way structured notes, Chapter 4 (from Lesson 4). Read the focus question aloud:

*   “On page, 66, Carlotta states, ‘It would be my last night of innocence.’ What change took place in her view of her life in Little Rock, Arkansas?”

  • Cold call on student pairs to share their responses. Listen for students to say something like: “Before her attempt to attend Central, Carlotta had an idealistic view of the democratic process as it relates to people of color in the United States. She trusted that once the Supreme Court ordered the integration of schools, that state governments and the people would follow the law, because it was deemed just and equitable. The day her entry to school was blocked by troops that were supposed to be agents offering protection, and segregationists were allowed to be verbally abusive and use scare tactics was when she realized that it did not matter that she was a citizen or that her parents were taxpayers.”
  • Share with students that Carlotta is realizing a lot of new things about her society. Have students take out their Journey to Justice note-catchers and reread the left column. Ask:

*   “What additional changes has Carlotta experienced?”

  • Invite students to work with their partners to add to their Journey to Justice note-catchers. After a few minutes, cold call on student pairs to share the changes Carlotta is experiencing.
  • Learning targets help students understand the purpose for the lesson.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • Invite students to follow along silently as you read the learning targets aloud:

*   “I can explain how the Plessy vs. Ferguson Supreme Court ruling codified the Jim Crow laws.”

*   “I can explain how the Plessy vs. Ferguson Supreme Court case connects to the Jim Crow laws.”

*   “I can use sentence starters to build on others’ ideas.”

  • Explain that the term codified means “making laws or rules into a code or system of behavior” and that meeting this learning target means that students will be able to explain how the Plessy vs. Ferguson ruling encouraged the Jim Crow laws to become an expected way of behavior.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Jim Crow Laws (5 minutes)

  • Explain that the experiences Carlotta had were a result of blacks seeking justice and truly experiencing the words from the Declaration of Independence, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.—That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed …”
  • Share with students that Jim Crow laws in the South did not allow for equal treatment of blacks and whites. In this lesson, they will learn more about Jim Crow laws and what Carlotta and the other members of the Little Rock Nine and the civil rights movement fought for.
  • Distribute Introduction to the Jim Crow Laws and project it with a document camera.
  • Invite students to follow along as you read it aloud.
  • Ask students to Think-Ink-Pair-Share for the following questions, found on the Introduction:

*   “What is meant by the word consorting in this Introduction?”

  • Listen for students to say that in this context consorting means to hanging out with someone of a different color. Ask:

*   “What was the motivation for the creation of the Jim Crow laws?”

  • Listen for students to draw on their background knowledge from previous lessons to say that the purpose of these laws was to “restore the social order.”
  • Remind students that, from the Southern perspective, restoring the social order meant that blacks had no power and were not of equal social standing with whites.
  • Allowing students to think and write before sharing ensures that most students will have ideas to share when it is time to do so.

B. World Café (30 minutes)

  • Inform students that they will be participating in the World Café protocol to analyze specific Jim Crow laws.
  • Group students into four groups.
  • Tell students that they will work in small groups to fill in a note-catcher. There will be four rounds, and after each round, the groups will switch according to the protocol.
  • Project the World Café protocol with the document camera and point out to students how the modified protocol will function—there is no assigned leader left behind with each rotation. Hand out the World Café note-catcher.
  • Explain to students that each table is labeled with a category: Education, Transportation, Intermarriage, and Other. There are corresponding Jim Crow Laws strips for each category, which are found at the appropriate table. Students read the laws, discuss them using the sentence starters also found at each table, and add to their note-catchers based on their discussions.
  • Tell students that they are to read the Jim Crow laws and then think about how the laws might relate/connect with something they read in the Plessy v. Ferguson case and in A Mighty Long Way. They are to refer to their Plessy v. Ferguson: Key Excerpts from the Court’s Decision and the chapters they have read in A Mighty Long Way to find evidence for their note-catcher.
  • Model the use of a sentence starter:

–   “Say that you are at the table with laws related to education. A peer makes a comment about one of the laws. A way to respond using the sentence starters located at the table could sound like: ‘What you said about separate schools reminded me of the way there are separate schools in A Mighty Long Way until Carlotta goes to Central. It also makes me think of Excerpt 2 of the Plessy v. Ferguson court ruling in which separate schools for white and black children are used as an example of black and white students being separate but having access to the same resources.”

  • Make it clear to students that they may not be able to connect each of the laws with something in Plessy v. Ferguson or in what they have read of A Mighty Long Way so far, but where they think of connections and can find evidence, they should record it. Also explain that although A Mighty Long Way was set in Little Rock, Arkansas, many of the Jim Crow laws on the strips are from other states like Alabama and Mississippi; however, students should still consider connections where they can.  
  • At each table students read the laws, discuss them using the sentence starters, and add to their note-catchers.
  • Circulate and check for understanding as groups meet and discuss the laws. Remind students to add to their note-catchers based on their discussions. Provide support to each group as necessary. As much as possible, address any confusion or misconceptions as groups are meeting. It may be helpful to inform students when they have only 1 minute left for their conversation in each round.
  • When the protocol is over, refocus the whole class. Recognize positive behaviors that you noticed during the World Café (showing leadership, referring often to the text, asking each other questions to clarify ideas, etc.). Cold call students to share their responses from their note-catchers. Invite the class to continue revising or adding to their note-catchers as appropriate during this time.
  • Distribute QuickWrite #1 for students to synthesize their reactions to the Jim Crow laws. Read the two prompts:

*   “How do the Jim Crow laws connect to Plessy v. Ferguson?”

*   “How do the Jim Crow laws connect to Carlotta’s experiences in A Mighty Long Way?

  • Invite a few students to share out their QuickWrite #1 responses.
  • Use of protocols (like World Café) allows for total participation of students. It encourages critical thinking, collaboration, and social construction of knowledge. It also helps students practice their speaking and listening skills.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Previewing Homework (1 minute)

  • Distribute A Mighty Long Way structured notes, Chapter 5, pages 82–98.
  • Explain that the word naiveté in the focus question means “innocence or ignorance because of youth.”

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Read Chapter 5 and complete the structured notes.
  • Provide struggling learners with the supported structured notes for additional scaffolding as they read the memoir.

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