Preparation for End of Unit Assessment: Making Connections between Song Lyrics and Texts, Part 2 | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U1:L12

Preparation for End of Unit Assessment: Making Connections between Song Lyrics and Texts, Part 2

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.8.1)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of an informational text. (RI.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can make connections between the texts I have read in this unit and the lyrics in the second stanza of "Lift Every Voice and Sing."
  • I can cite evidence from the text to support my connections between the lyrics and text.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Connecting Lyrics to Text Note-catcher: "Lift Every Voice and Sing."

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

     A. Reviewing Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

     A. Introducing the Second Stanza of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (15 minutes)   

     B. Preparing Notes for the Socratic Seminar (22 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

     A. Reviewing Homework (5 minutes)

4. Homework

     A. Finish recording connections between the lyrics and the texts you have read on your note-catcher. Identify the three or four most relevant and compelling connections with text-based evidence that you have recorded on your two Connecting Lyrics to Text note-catchers over the past couple of lessons. 

  • This lesson is a continuation of preparation for small group Socratic Seminar discussions in Lesson 13.
  • Students continue to make connections between the song lyrics and all the texts they have read so far in this unit. They are introduced to a new song, "Lift Every Voice and Sing." It is sometimes known as the African American National Anthem. The purpose of adding this song is to ensure that students have plenty of connections to discuss in the end of unit assessment in the next lesson.
  • Because of limited time in the lesson, students finish taking notes on the note-catcher for homework.
  • Be sure to have the proper equipment prepared to play the song "Lift Every Voice and Sing." This song can be found by searching for "Lift Every Voice and Sing" on free music or video streaming websites--for example, on YouTube.
  • Bear in mind that YouTube, social media video sites, and other website links may incorporate inappropriate content via comment banks and ads. Although some lessons include these links as the most efficient means to view content in preparation for the lesson, be sure to preview links, and/or use a filter service, such as www.safeshare.tv, for viewing these links in the classroom.
  • In advance: Search for the song "Lift Every Voice and Sing" on free music or video streaming websites--for example, on YouTube.
  • In advance: Post: Learning targets. 

Vocabulary

chastening, relevant, compelling

Materials

  • End of Unit 1 Discussion Prompt: Connecting Song Lyrics and Texts (from Lesson 11)
  • Song: "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (see Teaching Note)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Connecting Lyrics to Text Note-catcher: "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (one per student and one for display)
  • A Mighty Long Way (book; one per student)
  • Plessy v. Ferguson: The Court Decision (from Lesson 5)
  • Plessy v. Ferguson: The Dissenting Opinion (from Lesson 7)
  • World Cafe note-catcher (completed in Lesson 9)

Opening

Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Focus students on the learning targets and select volunteers to read the learning targets aloud for the whole group:

*   "I can make connections between the texts I have read in this unit and the lyrics in the second stanza of "Lift Every Voice and Sing."

*   "I can cite evidence from the text to support my connections between the lyrics and text."

  • Tell students that in this lesson they are going to further prepare to participate in a Socratic Seminar by connecting the lyrics of the second stanza of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" with the texts they have read so far in this module.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing the Second Stanza of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (15 minutes)

  • Display and invite students to retrieve their End of Unit 1Discussion Prompt: Connecting Song Lyrics and Texts from the previous lesson. Cold call a student to read it aloud for the group. Explain to students that in this lesson they are going to focus on the lyrics of the second stanza of "Lift Every Voice and Sing."
  • Play the song "Lift Every Voice and Sing (see Teaching Notes) and point out to students when the second stanza begins so that they can read the lyrics on their discussion prompt sheets as they listen.
  • Give students some background about the song: It was written as a poem and was performed for the first time by 500 schoolchildren in celebration of President Lincoln's birthday on February 12, 1900 in Jacksonville, Florida. It was adopted by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), an organization they have read about in A Mighty Long Way, as the organization's official song. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "Thinking about all the texts you have read so far and the background knowledge you now have about the civil rights movement, what are these lyrics mostly about? What is the gist?"

  • Select students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for student to explain that the gist of the lyrics is that times have been hard, and people have experienced pain and suffering, but still they keep trying to get justice.
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner and to annotate their prompt as they see fit:

*   "Look at the first three lines of the stanza. Chastening means to punish, so what do you think these lines mean?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that it means it has been a difficult journey, and they have been beaten as though they have done something wrong to the point that the journey has felt hopeless.
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner and to annotate their prompt as they see fit:

*   "Look at the next three lines of the stanza. What do you think they mean?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that it means that they pushed on through the bad times and have finally arrived at justice, which is what they have been seeking for generations.
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner and to annotate their prompt as they see fit:

*   "Look at the final lines of the stanza. What do you think they mean?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that they have come through the bad times and are now where they want to be--closer to justice.
  • Consider modifying the Fishbowl sentence starters for struggling readers or students who need more processing time. Cut the list down to three basic sentence starters and put each one underneath a heading such as: "When You Agree," "When You Disagree," and "When You Have a Question."
  • Consider preparing students who need more processing time or who struggle with speaking in front of others by giving them a list of the other perspectives/roles in the discussion beforehand.
  • Use the questions listed as a guide for the Fishbowl discussion, not as a script. This allows students to take charge of the discussion, bringing up questions and points they deem important, resulting in a more authentic discussion.

B. Preparing Notes for the Socratic Seminar (22 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the End of Unit 1 Assessment:Connecting Lyrics to Text Note-catcher: "Lift Every Voice and Sing." Explain to students that they will be using it to collect relevant evidence connecting the lyrics on the prompt to all the texts they have read.
  • Invite students to retrieve: A Mighty Long Way text, their Plessy v. Ferguson: The Court Decision and Plessy v. Ferguson: The Dissenting Opinion, and their completed World Cafe note-catcher.
  • Just as in the previous lesson, encourage students to take one text at a time. For example, suggest that they could begin with A Mighty Long Way.
  • Circulate to support students in making connections and identifying relevant evidence. Ask guiding questions:

*   "What connections are you making between these lyrics and this text? Why?"

*   "What evidence can you find to support those connections?"

  • Some students may benefit from support in finding the appropriate section of the book to quickly look for evidence. Encourage those students to sit with the teacher or with a student who has a clear understanding of the book.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Reviewing Homework (5 minutes)

  • Focus students on the part of the discussion prompt that says:

*   "... prepare to use the most relevant and compelling evidence from the text to support your ideas."

  • Remind students that compelling means interesting and attention-grabbing.
  • Explain to students that although they may have many connections recorded on their two note-catchers, in a group discussion they will have limited time, so they need to choose three or four of the most relevant and compelling pieces of evidence to discuss.
  • Explain to students that for homework they are going to finish recording connections between the lyrics and texts on their note-catchers, and they are also going to select three or four of the most relevant and compelling connections with text-based evidence to share in the discussion.
  • Encourage students to highlight or put a star next to the most relevant and compelling connections they have made.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish recording connections between the lyrics and the texts you have read on your note-catcher. Identify the three or four most relevant and compelling connections with text-based evidence that you have recorded on your two Connecting Lyrics to Text note-catchers over the past couple of lessons.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up