Preparation for End of Unit Assessment: Making Making Connections between Song Lyrics and Texts, Part 1 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3B:U1:L11

Preparation for End of Unit Assessment: Making Making Connections between Song Lyrics and Texts, Part 1

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.8.1)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of an informational text. (RI.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can make connections between the texts I have read in this unit, and the title and lyrics in “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around.”
  • I can cite evidence from the text to support my connections between the lyrics and text.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Connecting Lyrics to Text Note-catcher: “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around.”

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

     A. Returning Mid-Unit Assessments (5 minutes)

     B. Reviewing Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

     A. Introducing the Discussion Prompt and Rubric (12 minutes)  

     B. Preparing Notes for the Socratic Seminar (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

     A. Sharing Evidence (5 minutes)

4. Homework

     A. Finish recording connections between the song title and lyrics, “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around,” and texts you have read on your note-catcher.

  1. Continue to read your independent reading book.
  • This lesson is preparation for small group Socratic Seminar discussions in the End of Unit 1 Assessment.
  • In this lesson, students begin to make connections between the song title and lyrics, “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around,” and all the texts they have read so far in this unit. Because of limited time in the lesson, they finish it for homework.
  • As in the previous lesson, be sure to have the proper equipment prepared to play the song “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around.” This song can be found by searching for “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around” on free music or video streaming websites—for example, on YouTube.
  • Bear in mind that YouTube, social media video sites, and other website links may incorporate inappropriate content via comment banks and ads. Although some lessons include these links as the most efficient means to view content in preparation for the lesson, be sure to preview links, and/or use a filter service, such as www.safeshare.tv, for viewing these links in the classroom.
  • The prompt also mentions the second stanza of the song “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” This song will be introduced in the next lesson. Ensure students understand this.
  • Students are introduced to the rubric and analyze what each part means on a Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart. Visualizing what something will look and sound like should help students to better achieve it. See the example for teacher reference in supporting materials.
  • In advance:

–   Prepare the Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with feedback.

–   Prepare the Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart (see Work Time A and supporting materials for blank and completed examples).

–   Review: Socratic Seminar protocol (see Appendix).

-   Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

relevant, compelling, drawing, advocating (from rubric)

Materials

  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessments (from Lesson 8; with teacher feedback)
  • End of Unit 1 Discussion Prompt: Connecting Song Lyrics and Texts (one per student and one for display)
  • Highlighter (one per student and one for the teacher)
  • Connecting Lyrics to Text Discussion Rubric (one per student and one for display)
  • Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart (new; see Work Time A and supporting materials)
  • Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Song: “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around” (see Teaching Note)
  • Lyrics: “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around” (from Lesson 10)
  • Journey to Justice note-catcher (completed in Lessons 3 and 10)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Connecting Lyrics to Text Note-catcher: “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around” (one per student and one for display)
  • A Mighty Long Way (book; one per student)
  • Plessy v. Ferguson: The Court Decision (from Lesson 5)
  • Plessy v. Ferguson: The Dissenting Opinion (from Lesson 7)
  • World Café note-catcher (completed in Lesson 9)

Opening

Opening

A. Returning Mid-Unit Assessments (5 minutes)

  • Return the Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with teacher feedback. Provide some general comments about things you noticed, for example:

*  “I was pleased to see everyone citing evidence to support their claims from both the court’s decision and the dissenting opinion.”

*  “I noticed that some people didn’t compare how the two interpretations were different—instead they restated the court’s decision and the dissenting opinion.”

  • Invite students to spend 3 minutes looking over your feedback. Explain that if students have any questions about the feedback, they are to write their names in a list on the board and you will get to them over the course of this lesson.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Focus students on the learning targets and select volunteers to read the learning targets aloud for the whole group:

*   “I can make connections between the texts I have read in this unit, and the title and lyrics in “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around.”

*   “I can cite evidence from the text to support my connections between the lyrics and text.”

  • Tell students that in this lesson they are going to prepare to participate in a Socratic Seminar by connecting the lyrics from “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around” with the texts they have read so far in this module.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing the Discussion Prompt and Rubric (12 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the End of Unit 1Discussion Prompt: Connecting Song Lyrics and Texts. Cold call a student to read it aloud for the group.
  • If students haven’t participated in a Socratic Seminar before, display the Socratic Seminar protocol and invite students to read it with you. Make it clear that students will be working in small groups of five students for their Socratic Seminars.
  • Explain that the text students will be talking about in the Socratic Seminar is the title and lyrics on the prompt. Use a highlighter to show this text on the displayed prompt.
  • Hand out the ConnectingLyrics to Text Discussion Rubric and give students 3 minutes to read the “4” column silently. Draw students’ attention to the “Preparation and Evidence” row and have them circle the words relevant and compelling. Explain that the information they share needs to be related, or relevant, to the topic and questions being discussed and what they share should be compelling, or very interesting.
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   “What would this look like? What would students who achieve a 4 for this part of the rubric look and sound like in a Socratic Seminar discussion?”

  • Select a volunteer to share ideas with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that those achieving a 4 would have a sheet of notes with them in the discussion and would be citing evidence from the text every time they make a claim in the discussion.
  • Record these points in the appropriate column onthe Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart. See the Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) for guidance.
  • Next, direct students to the “Effective Communication” row and have them circle the word drawing in the last bullet. Explain that part of being an effective communicator is to draw, or invite, others into the discussion. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   “What would this look like? What would students who achieve a 4 for this part of the rubric look and sound like in a Socratic Seminar discussion?”

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that those achieving a 4 would look like they were listening by making eye contact with the speaker. The volume of their voices would be loud enough to be heard, but not shouting and they would be asking clarifying questions or inviting students who haven’t yet spoken to share ideas. 
  • Record these points in the appropriate column on the Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart. See the Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) for guidance.
  • Finally, direct students to the “Respecting Multiple Perspectives” row, and have students circle the word advocating. Explain that advocating means supporting and that they must support their opinions with the strongest evidence.
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   “What would this look like? What would students who achieve a 4 for this part of the rubric look and sound like in a Socratic Seminar discussion?”

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that those achieving a 4 would look like they were listening by making eye contact with the person speaking, and they would be paraphrasing what others said.
  • Record these points in the appropriate column on the Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart. See the Socratic Seminar: Look and Sound anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) for guidance.
  • Analyzing the rubric can help students to understand what is expected of them in an assessment.
  • Visualizing what something should look and sound like will help students recreate it.
  • Asking the whole group to help you construct an anchor chart to capture their thinking will help students feel ownership over the criteria, making them more likely to follow the criteria. It will also give them a point of reference in the next few lessons.

B. Preparing Notes for the Socratic Seminar (20 minutes)

  • Tell students that this in lesson they will focus on “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around,” and in the next lesson they will look at “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”
  • Play the song “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around” and display the lyrics. Invite students to read the lyrics as they listen to the song. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   “What do these lyrics mean? What does it mean to say, ‘Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me around’?”

*   “What would ‘turning around’ mean?”

*   “Why do you think those lines repeated over and over again?”

  • Select students to share whole group. Listen for them to explain that it means not letting anyone stop you from reaching your goals and getting justice for what you know is right, and not letting anything distract you from the justice you believe is due. They may also explain that “turning around” would mean segregation and people not treated equally, and that the lines are repeated as though the person writing them is using them as a mantra—to help them stay focused on their goal.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

*   “What connections can you think of immediately between Carlotta’s experiences and these song lyrics?”

  • Refer students to the discussion prompt. Remind them that they already started to think about the connections between A Mighty Long Way and this song on the first section of their Journey to Justice note-catcher completed in Lesson 3.
  • Display and distribute the End of Unit 1 Assessment:Connecting Lyrics to Text Note-catcher: “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around.” Explain to students that they will be using it to collect relevant evidence connecting the lyrics on the prompt to all the texts they have read.
  • Invite students to retrieve: A Mighty Long Way text, their Plessy v. Ferguson: The Court Decision and Plessy v. Ferguson: The Dissenting Opinion, and their completed World Café note-catcher.
  • Encourage students to take one text at a time. They could begin with A Mighty Long Way and their Journey to Justice note-catcher, choosing the most relevant and compelling evidence that connects Carlotta’s experiences with the lyrics to record on the new note-catcher.
  • Circulate to support students in making connections and identifying relevant evidence. Ask guiding questions:

*  “What connections are you making between these lyrics and this text? Why?”

*  “What evidence can you find to support those connections?”

  • Some students may benefit from support in finding the appropriate section of the book to quickly look for evidence. Encourage those students to sit with the teacher or with a student who has a clear understanding of the book.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Sharing Evidence (5 minutes)

  • Refocus the whole group. Explain that students will be continuing and finishing this work for homework, so they should not be frustrated if they haven’t yet finished.
  • Invite students to pair up with someone in the room to share the connections they have made between the song title and lyrics, “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around,” and the texts, as well as the evidence to support those connections.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish recording connections between the song title and lyrics, “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around,” and texts you have read on your note-catcher.
  • Continue to read your independent reading book.

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