Researching Mine Okubo: Gathering Textual Evidence | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U3:L3

Researching Mine Okubo: Gathering Textual Evidence

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.8.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can gather evidence about Mine Okubo's life from informational texts for my narrative.
  • I can plan a narrative that describes the moment when Mine Okubo "became visible again."

Ongoing Assessment

  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 389-398 (from homework)
  • Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again after Internment note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Focus Question (10 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

2. Work Time

A. Gathering Textual Evidence about Mine Okubo (32 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Previewing Homework (2 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish reading the informational text about Mine Okubo's life that you began in class today. Choose the moment in Okubo's life that your narrative will describe. (The four choices are listed on the Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again after Internment handout from Lesson 2.) In writing, answer this question: "Based on your research, why did you choose this moment?"

  • In this lesson, students read an informational text about Mine Okubo's life so they have enough information to write a well-informed narrative on how Okubo "became visible again" for their performance task, Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again after Internment.
  • The two informational texts about Okubo's life, "Riverside's Mine Okubo" and "Mine Okubo," are both rich but vary in length and difficulty. Consider choosing just one of the texts for the entire class to read, or assign different texts to different students depending on their reading level. Advanced readers will benefit from reading multiple texts; consider assigning the second informational text for these students to read for homework. 
  • Since students are embarking on brief research in this lesson, in the spirit of the other research lessons at this grade level, the two texts provide differentiated levels to allow students greater independence as they study this aspect of Mine Okubo's life. Consider extending this lesson over one more class period if you wish to have students read both texts in class.
  • Although the performance task is a more creative project than the informational essay students wrote in Unit 2, it is designed to be based on textual evidence and resemble Hillenbrand's literary nonfiction style. As students work, it will be important to remind them that the major events in their narratives should have a factual basis, although they are being dramatized and fictionalized using students' imaginations. The model narrative provides a good example of this; although smaller incidents in Okubo's life have been fictionalized (such as her encounter with the woman at the newsstand), the major events are drawn from informational texts about her life (such as the publication of her drawings in a national magazine).
  • In advance: Split students into groups of four for the focus question discussion; read the two informational texts about Okubo ("Riverside's Mine Okubo" and "Mine Okubo") and decide which students will read each one.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

ethics, serene, frugal, appropriated, integrity (from Informational Texts about Mine Okubo: Source 1); refine, alter, wry, scanty, vivid (from Informational Texts about Mine Okubo: Source 2)

Materials

  • "The Life of Mine Okubo" (from Unit 2, Lesson 4)
  • Gathering Textual Evidence: Becoming Visible Again after Internment note-catcher (one per student)
  • "Riverside's Mine Okubo" (one per student)
  • "Mine Okubo" (one per student)
  • Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again after Internment handout (from Lesson 2; one to display)
  • Document camera 

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Focus Question (10 minutes)

  • Divide students into groups of four. Have them discuss their answers to the focus question on the structured notes homework:

*     "What statement is Hillenbrand trying to make about resilience? What in the text makes you think this?"

  • In their groups, have students write a thematic statement about resilience based on the new information in their homework reading.
  • After a few minutes, have each group share out their thematic statement about resilience.
  • Congratulate students on finishing Unbroken. Give specific positive praise for evidence of their growing stamina as readers. 

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • Have students read along silently as you read the learning targets aloud:

*     "I can gather evidence about Mine Okubo's life from informational texts for my narrative."

*     "I can plan a narrative that describes the moment when Mine Okubo 'became visible again.'"

  • Tell students that they will use the rest of today's class to read about Mine's life so they have enough information to start writing their narratives tomorrow. Remind them that like the narrative in Unbroken, their narrative will be based on true events, so they need to gather textual evidence to build on.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Gathering Textual Evidence about Mine Okubo (32 minutes)

  • Have students take out their copy of "The Life of Mine Okubo" while you distribute the Gathering Textual Evidence: Becoming Visible Again after Internment note-catcher. Explain that before they can write the story of how Mine became visible again, their narrative will need to orient readers to the reasons Mine is "invisible" in the first place. Remind students that they have already done the work of tracking how people tried to make Mine invisible during the war when they gathered evidence for their informational essay in Unit 2. Tell them to skim through "The Life of MineOkubo" to refresh their memories about her experiences in the internment camp, then jot down some notes in the left-hand column of the note-catcher.
  • After a few minutes, cold call students to remind the class of the ways in which Mine was "invisible" during the war. Listen for: "She was isolated and dehumanized by being moved out of her home and into a remote camp," "She was forced to live in a former horse stable," "She was watched by armed guards," "She was not allowed to bring her possessions with her," and "Her name was replaced by the number 13660." Encourage students to write these ideas down in the left-hand column of their note-catcher if they do not already have them.
  • Point out the other two columns on the note-catcher: The middle column is for students to write down any evidence they find about how Mine became "visible" again (which will be critical in crafting their narratives), and the right-hand column is for any interesting details that they want to work into their narratives. (For example, they may want to write down details that reveal aspects of Mine's character in this column.)
  • Tell students that you will give them a new informational text about Mine's life after she left the internment camp. Explain that the new texts begin by reviewing information they already know about Mine's childhood and her time in the camp. However, students should still read the entire text, because they might find new details in it that will help them write an engaging narrative.
  • Depending on which text you have decided to have each student read (see Teaching Note at the top of this lesson), distribute "Riverside's Mine Okubo" and/or "Mine Okubo." Give students the rest of the class period to read and take notes. Circulate while they work to check in with them about what they are learning and to help them strike a balance between grounding their narrative in textual evidence and using their imaginations to dramatize the moment when Mine became visible again. 
  • Advanced readers will benefit from reading multiple texts; consider assigning the second informational text for these students to read for homework. 

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Previewing Homework (1 minute)

  • Distribute the Unbroken structured notes, pages 389-398. Tell students that their homework is to finish reading Unbroken. Remind them that the book's epilogue is crucial to understanding the thematic concept of "becoming visible again," which they will need to understand well so they can write Mine's "becoming visible again" narrative.

Homework

Homework
  • Read pages 389-398 in Unbroken and complete the structured notes. Focus question: "What statement is Hillenbrand trying to make about resilience? What in the text makes you think this?"

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