Analyzing a Thematic Concept: Becoming Visible Again, Part 2 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U3:L1

Analyzing a Thematic Concept: Becoming Visible Again, Part 2

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.8.1)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can explain the general function of verbals (gerunds, participles, infinitives) and their function in sentences.
  • I can analyze a thematic concept in Unbroken.
  • I can analyze how an incident described in Unbroken provokes Louie to make a decision.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 354-380 (from homework)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Becoming Visible Again note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Writer: Language Techniques (10 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing the Thematic Concept: Becoming Visible Again (33 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Preview Homework (1 minute)

4. Homework

A. Read the epilogue, pages 381-389 in Unbroken, and complete the structured notes

  • Students continue to work with the language standards in this lesson. This is challenging work; students will continue to work toward mastery in higher grade levels.
  • The text students study in this lesson portrays a critical incident in Louie's journey to becoming visible again and is based on Louie's account as told to the author. The author provides a model of how to relay the incident by her care to avoid offering her opinion of this event. She respectfully holds true to Louie's account by expressing the deeply personal experience in the way he has described it. Hillenbrand is reporting Louie's own authentic experience, and students will study the critical incident as such.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

verbals, pivotal moment, turning point; indignant (373), grace (365), profound (376)

Materials

  • Verbals handout (one per student)
  • Verbals handout key (for teacher reference)
  • Unbroken (book; one per student)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Becoming Visible Again note-catcher (one per student)
  • Close Reading Guide: Becoming Visible Again (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Becoming Visible Again anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 17)
  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 381-389 (one per student)
  • Unbroken supported structured notes, pages 381-389 (optional, for students who need more support)
  • Unbroken Structured Notes Teacher Guide, pages 381-389 (for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Writer: Language Techniques (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to sit with their Midway partner. Distribute the Verbals handout. Read the definition of verbals at the top of the page. Explain that authors can use verbals in a variety of ways in their writing to aid understanding. Explain that there are three types of verbals: gerunds, participles, and infinitives.
  • Cold call a student to read the definition of gerund. Cold call students to read the examples. Point out that gerunds look like verbs but act as nouns.
  • Cold call a student to read the definition of participle. Cold call others to read the examples. Point out that there are two types of participles: past and present.
  • Cold call a student to read the definition of infinitive. Point out that students have probably encountered infinitives in their foreign language studies. The infinitive in most foreign languages is a special form of the verb, but in English, an infinitive is the word "to" with the stem form of the verb.
  • Cold call a student to read the examples.
  • Read the "tip." Explain that it can be tricky as they encounter sentences with a verb and one or more verbals to identify accurately the verb and verbals. Encourage them to find the word acting as the verb in the sentence before trying to identify the verbals.
  • Invite students to work with their partner to practice identifying verbals in examples from Unbroken. Circulate and monitor.
  • When students are done, go over the answers, referring to the Verbals handout key (for teacher reference) as needed.

1. Lasting, debilitating--participles

2. To restore--infinitive

3. Running--gerund

4. Training--gerund

5. To derail--infinitive

6. Riveted--participle

  • Read aloud the first learning target:

* "I can explain the general function of verbals (gerunds, participles, infinitives) and their function in sentences."

  • Tell students that they will spend more time working with verbals in the next lesson.
  • Consider having students circle the verbs on the handout and underline the verbals.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • Read aloud the second and third learning targets:

* "I can analyze a thematic concept in Unbroken."

* "I can analyze how an incident described in Unbroken provokes Louie to make a decision."

  • Cold call several students to summarize what they know about the thematic concept of becoming visible again after captivity. Listen for students to use the terms "dignity" and "reconnecting" in their responses.

Work Time

Work Time

A. Analyzing the Thematic Concept: Becoming Visible (33 minutes)

  • Be sure students have their text, Unbroken. Have them turn and talk with their partner to verbally summarize:

* "What was Louie's journey toward becoming visible again after captivity?"

  • Encourage them to use the two aspects of visibility in their summary.
  • Cold call several pairs to share. Students should mention that while Louie is becoming more and more visible reconnecting with his public presence and many jobs, he is declining when it comes to regaining his dignity.
  • Next, have students share their answers to the focus question from the Unit 2, Lesson 19 homework.
  • Cold call pairs to share their answers. Listen for something like: "Faith in God finally brings Louie home. When he attends the meeting led by Billy Graham, he has a flashback of a promise he had made while he was stranded on the raft with Phil and Mac during the war: 'If you save me, I will serve you forever' (375). He realizes that his prayer had been answered on the raft, and he decides to make a change. 'He felt supremely alive. He began walking' (375). After that meeting, Louie dumps all of his alcohol down the drain and takes out an old Bible to read. He never has flashbacks of the war again, and he starts on a new path to become an inspirational speaker and forgive the Japanese guards for what they had done to him."
  • Distribute the Text-Dependent Questions: Becoming Visible Again note-catcher. Refer to the Close Reading Guide: Becoming Visible Again (answers, for teacher reference) for this part of the lesson. Students will need to be able to see the Becoming Visible Again anchor chart for this portion of the lesson. They will do a Think-Pair-Share for each question posed.
  • After the close reading, explain that this moment in the book and in Louie's life can be described as a pivotal moment, which is a decisive, key, critical, or crucial event that changes everything. This moment can also be called a turning point. Ask:

* "Why could a decisive moment like this be called a turning point?"

  • Give students time to turn and talk, then cold call pairs to share their answer. Listen for: "It can be called a turning point since it is a point in Louie's life where he turns from the way he was living and takes a different path."
  • Share that since this is such an important event in Louie's journey to becoming visible again, students are going to spend some time closely reading this moment.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Previewing Homework (1 minute)

  • Distribute the Unbroken structured notes, pages 381-389. Read the focus question aloud:

* "In what ways is Louie's later life still an example of his 'resilient optimism'?"

Homework

Homework
  • Read the epilogue, pages 381-389 in Unbroken, and complete the structured notes.

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