Gathering Textual Evidence: “Invisibility” of Those Interned | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U2:L9

Gathering Textual Evidence: “Invisibility” of Those Interned

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)
  • I can gather relevant information from a variety of sources. (W.8.8)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the theme of "invisibility" in primary sources about Japanese-American internment and "The Life of Mine Okubo."
  • I can gather relevant information from a variety of sources about the "invisibility" of captives during WWII. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Venn diagram: Mine and Louie (from homework)
  • Gathering Textual Evidence note-catcher (from Lesson 3)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Homework (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. The "Invisibility" of Japanese-American Internees (23 minutes)

B. Gathering Evidence of "Invisibility" (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

B. Preview Homework (1 minute)

4. Homework

A. Finish adding evidence from primary sources and "The Life of Mine Okudo" to your Gathering Textual Evidence Note-Catcher.

  • Students begin to synthesize what they've learned about Japanese-American internment in the previous four lessons with their ongoing work with the "invisibility" theme of Unbroken. Students find strong evidence of "invisibility" in the primary sources packet and "The Life of Mine Okubo," which scaffolds their progress toward the End of Unit 2 Assessment (Informational Essay and Commentary: The Invisibility of Captives during WWII).
  • If you have not done so already, preview this assessment to have a clearer sense of where students are heading. Consider writing the assessment essay yourself to understand the skills students need to apply in their own writing.
  • In advance: Preview Work Time A to envision your modeling with Source 6.
  • Review: Fist to Five in Checking for Understanding Techniques (see Appendix).
  • Post: Learning targets; large versions of primary sources.

Vocabulary

invisibility, dehumanized

Materials

  • Large copies of primary sources (from Lesson 7)
  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet (from Lesson 6)
  • Sentence strips (large blank pieces of paper; five per student and two for modeling)
  • Tape (one roll per three to four students)
  • "The Life of Mine Okubo" (from Lesson 4)
  • Gathering Textual Evidence note-catcher (from Lesson 3)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Homework (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit with their Midway discussion partner. Have them share their homework (Venn diagram: Mine and Louie) with each other.
  • After 3 minutes, cold call several students to share:

* "What connections and similarities did you identify between Mine and Louie's experiences?"

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Remind students that the theme of this unit is the idea of invisibility. Ask for a volunteer to remind the class of the two different definitions of "invisibility" used for this unit. Listen for students to explain that invisibility could mean being cut off from the outside world or being dehumanized. Remind them that this means having one's dignity taken away or being treated like less than a human. Point out that prefixes "in-" and "de-" both have to do with "not" or "the opposite of."

* "I can analyze the theme of 'invisibility' in primary sources about Japanese-American internment and 'The Life of Mine Okubo.'"

  • Read the learning targets aloud as students read along:

* "I can gather relevant information from a variety of sources about the 'invisibility' of captives during WWII."

  • Tell students that the End of Unit 2 Assessment is an informational essay explaining how captives like Louie Zamperini and Mine Okubo were made "invisible" (in both senses of the term) during WWII. Today, they will gather evidence about how Japanese-American internment made internees "invisible" so they can use this evidence in their essay.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. The "Invisibility" of Japanese-American Internees (23 minutes)

  • Refer students to the large copies of primary sources posted on the wall. Remind them that they have determined the texts' points of view, analyzed the ways in which they disagree, and evaluated the effectiveness of their different mediums. Give students specific positive praise for the thinking they have already done with these difficult texts (e.g., comments you heard students make over the past few days).
  • Tell students that today they will add another layer to their understanding of these texts by analyzing them for evidence of the "invisibility" theme they've been tracking in Unbroken.
  • Have students take out their Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet.
  • Post the following instructions and read them aloud as students silently follow along:

1. Reread the primary sources in the packet.

2. Find evidence of ways people tried to make Japanese-Americans "invisible" during WWII.

3. Write your evidence on one of the sentence strips and tape it beneath the primary source on the wall.

  • Tell students that you will model this process for them.
  • Instruct students to open their Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet to Source 6.
  • Explain that this is a good example of "invisibility" because the people in the picture have been dehumanized. Their individual identities have been taken away and replaced with identification numbers. The tags attached to them make them seem more like objects than people.
  • On a sentence strip, write something like: "Dehumanization: identities replaced with numbers." Tape this sentence strip to the wall beneath Source 6.
  • Tell students to look at the last quote of Source 8. Ask:

* "What is an example of 'invisibility' in this quotation?"

  • Listen for a student to notice that Okubo mentions being "close to freedom and yet far from it." 
  • Probe, asking a volunteer to explain:

* "Which kind of 'invisibility' does this connect to: dehumanization or isolation?"

  • Listen for: "This is an example of isolation."
  • On a sentence strip, write something like: "Isolation: fenced in and guarded." Tape this sentence strip to the wall beneath Source 8.
  • Tell students it is now their turn to "have a go." Ask them to work independently to find their own evidence of invisibility in these sources. As students work, circulate to clarify the definitions of "invisibility" and help students find the strongest evidence.  After several minutes, invite students to post their sentence strips and invite students to review their peers' thinking.
  • With 3 minutes remaining, call for the class's attention. Cold call students to share back some of the evidence that they found. 

B. Gathering Evidence of "Invisibility" (10 minutes)

  • Have students take out "The Life of Mine Okubo" and their Gathering Textual Evidence note-catcher. Briefly review each column of the note-catcher to ensure students understand what information belongs in each.
  • Invite students to add strong textual evidence from the primary sources and "The Life of Mine Okubo" to their note-catcher. They may work on their own or with their partner. (Encourage students to use the strongest ideas from the previous activity on their note-catchers too.)
  • As students work, circulate to clarify the definitions of "invisibility" and help students find the strongest evidence.
  • Graphic organizers engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning. For students needing additional support, you may want to provide a partially filled-in graphic organizer.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • With 1 minute remaining, call for the class's attention. Read the learning targets aloud as students read along:

* "I can analyze the theme of 'invisibility' in primary sources about Japanese-American internment and 'The Life of Mine Okubo.'"

* "I can gather relevant information from a variety of sources about the 'invisibility' of captives during WWII."

  • Ask students to use the Fist to Five Checking for Understanding Technique to rate their progress toward today's learning targets. Make a note of students who rate themselves low and plan to follow up with them about their note-catcher before they write a first draft of their informational essay.
  • For students who struggle, consider providing a sentence starter for this exit ticket.

B. Preview Homework (1 minute)

  • Tell students to continue working on the Gathering Textual Evidence note-catcher for tonight's homework.
  • Also be sure students know that tomorrow they will take an assessment to demonstrate mastery of some of the skills they have been working on. Build up this assessment as an opportunity for them to "show what you know."

Homework

Homework
  • Finish adding evidence from primary sources and "The Life of Mine Okubo" to your Gathering Textual Evidence note-catcher.

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