Building Background Knowledge: The Internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII, Part 4 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U2:L8

Building Background Knowledge: The Internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII, Part 4

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present an idea. (RI.8.7)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use primary source documents to build background knowledge about the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII.
  • I can explain how World War II affected American society.
  • I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present a point of view about Japanese-American internment during WWII.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment During World War II QuickWrite (from homework)
  • Analyzing Mediums Exit Ticket

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Focus Question (4 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing Primary Sources: Different Mediums(30 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket and Preview Homework (10 minute)

4. Homework

A. Fill in a Venn diagram to compare and contrast Louie Zamperini's and Mine Okudo's experience during WWII. Use specific details and evidence from Unbroken and "The Life of Mine Okudo."

  • This is the last of four lessons in which students enrich their understanding of Unbroken's historical context by building background knowledge about Japanese-American internment and the effects of war on individuals and society during WWII. Today's lesson continues from Lessons 6 and 7 in analyzing several conflicting primary sources about internment, focusing on evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present ideas.
  • For homework, students will make a reentry into their study of Louie by comparing the experiences of Louie and Mine during WWII.
  • Post: Learning targets; large versions of primary sources.

Vocabulary

medium, advantages, disadvantages

Materials

  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II Structured Notes Teacher Guide (from Lesson 6; for teacher reference)
  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet (from Lesson 6)
  • Large versions of primary sources (from Lesson 7; one of each to display)
  • Analyzing Mediums handout (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Venn diagram: Mine and Louie (one per student)
  • Analyzing Mediums Teacher's Guide (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Analyzing Mediums Exit Ticket (one per student)

Mine

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the QuickWrite from homework (4 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit with their Pearl Harbor discussion partner. Have them discuss the QuickWrite from the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet.
  • After two minutes, cold call a student pair to share their best ideas and evidence for the QuickWrite. (Refer to the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II Structured NotesTeacher Guide for more details on what to listen for.)
  • Giving students time to talk through ideas supports comprehension and builds class culture.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • Tell students that today they will continue working with the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet.
  • Read the learning targets aloud as students read along silently:

* "I can use primary source documents to build background knowledge about the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII."

* "I can explain how World War II affected American society."

* "I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present a point of view about Japanese-American internment during WWII."

  • Ask students to briefly turn and talk with a partner to paraphrase what they're working on today.

Work Time

Work Time

A. Analyzing Primary Sources: Different Mediums (30 minutes)

  • Tell students that they now will focus on the different ways people communicated their ideas about Japanese-American internment. Explain that one way of communicating ideas is called a Say something like: "One example of a medium is using words to communicate your ideas," then ask:

* "What is another example of a medium?"

  • Listen for: artwork, photographs, political cartoons, etc.
  • Point out there are several different mediums on display in the large versions of primary sources posted around the room. Explain that, even though these sources are about the same topic (Japanese-American internment), the creators of these sources chose different mediums to express their point of view about that topic. Students will now analyze those choices.
  • Distribute and display the Analyzing Mediums handout on a document camera. Remind students that every medium has advantages (benefits) and disadvantages (drawbacks or downsides). Remind students that the prefix "dis-" means "not" or "opposite from."
  • Ask students to brainstorm:

* "What are some of the advantages of choosing text as a medium to communicate your point of view?"

  • Listen for: "You can fully and clearly explain your ideas," "You can use strong words to express your point of view," "Text might be taken more seriously than other mediums," etc. As students share ideas, write them on the displayed Analyzing Mediums handout. Invite students to do the same on their own copies of the handout.
  • Ask students to brainstorm:

* "What are some disadvantages of choosing text as a medium to communicate your point of view?"

  • Listen for: "People who can't read won't hear your message," "Words might not catch people's attention as much as a picture would," etc. Write these ideas down as students do the same.
  • Focus students on the handout. Prompt them to work with their partner to brainstorm ideas for the "Medium: Photograph" and "Medium: Cartoon" sections.
  • After a few minutes, focus students' attention and cold call several students to share ideas. Fill in the rest of the displayed Analyzing Mediums handout as students add others' ideas to their own.
  • Read Question 1 on the Analyzing Mediums handout aloud:

* "Source 1 and Source 7 share a point of view on Japanese-Americans. What is that point of view?"

  • Ask for a volunteer to explain the shared point of view. Listen for: "These sources both say that Japanese-Americans are a threat to the United States." Students should write this answer down as you fill in the displayed handout. (Refer to the Analyzing Mediums Teacher Guide for more ideas.)
  • Read Question 2 aloud:

* "What are the two different mediums the creators of these sources chose to use?"

  • Cold call a student to answer. Listen for: "Source 1 is text, and Source 7 is a cartoon." Have students fill in this answer as you fill in the displayed handout.
  • Read Question 3 aloud: 

* "Why might Walter Lippman, the author of Source 1, have chosen to use text as his medium? What are the advantages of using text to communicate his point of view about Japanese-Americans?"

  • Cold call a student and listen for: "He can show how serious his message is," "He can explain all of his ideas fully," etc. Fill in these answers on the displayed handout as students fill in their own.
  • Read Question 4 aloud:

* "Why might Dr. Seuss, the author of Source 7, have chosen to use a cartoon as his medium? What are the advantages of using a cartoon to communicate his point of view about Japanese-Americans?"

  • Cold call a student and listen for: "It is easier to understand his point of view right away without reading a lot of words," "He can use humor to lighten a serious situation so people will be more willing to listen to him," etc. Fill these answers in on the displayed handout as students fill in their own.
  • Next, have students work with their partners to complete the questions about Source 4 and Source 8 on the back of the Analyzing Mediums handout. While students work, circulate to check their comprehension.
  • With 3 minutes remaining, focus students' attention and review Questions 7 and 8 on the back of the Analyzing Mediums handout. Ask,

* "If you had to teach someone about the Japanese-American internment camps, which medium would you choose to use, and why?" Call on several volunteers to answer, and listen for them to name clear advantages of their chosen medium.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket and Preview Homework (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the Analyzing Mediums Exit Ticket. Read the prompt aloud:

* "The two sources below both communicate ideas about Japanese-American internment, but their creators have chosen to use different mediums to express these ideas. Beneath each source, explain at least one advantage and one disadvantage of using this medium to present these specific ideas."

  • Address any clarifying questions and invite students to begin.
  • Once all students have completed the exit ticket, preview the homework. Point out to students that they are transitioning back to a deeper focus on Unbroken.
  • For students who struggle, consider providing a sentence starter for this exit ticket.

Homework

Homework
  • Fill in a Venn diagram to compare and contrast Louie Zamperini's and Mine Okubo's experiences during WWII. Use specific details and evidence from Unbroken and "The Life of Mine Okubo."

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