Building Background Knowledge: The Internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII, Part 3 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U2:L7

Building Background Knowledge: The Internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII, Part 3

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can analyze texts for disagreement on facts or interpretation. (RI.8.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use primary source documents to build background knowledge about the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII.
  • I can explain how World War II affected American society.
  • I can cite evidence to analyze primary sources for disagreements about Japanese-American internment during WWII. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet (text-dependent questions) (from homework)
  • Source Comparison strips

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Gist (6 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing Primary Sources: Text-Dependent Questions Review (10 minutes)

B. Analyzing Primary Sources: Conflicting Accounts (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Preview Homework (2 minute)

4. Homework

A. Reread the primary source documents from today's lesson and complete the QuickWrite.

  • This is the third of four lessons in which students will enrich their understanding of Unbroken's historical context by building background knowledge about Japanese-American internment and the effects of war on individuals and society during WWII. Today's lesson continues the focus from Lesson 6 on analyzing several conflicting primary sources about internment. Consider collaborating with a social studies teacher for a deeper study of these primary source documents.
  • In advance: Cut Source Comparison strips apart, so each pair of students has six strips.
  • Review: Fist to Five in Checking for Understanding Techniques (see Appendix).
  • Post: Learning targets; large versions of primary sources.

Vocabulary

student-selected vocabulary words from Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet

Materials

  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet (from Lesson 6)
  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment During World War II packet, Teacher Guide (from Lesson 6; for teacher reference)
  • Large versions of primary sources (one of each; to display)
  • Source Comparison strips (one to two for think-aloud; six per student pair)
  • Document camera
  • Tape
  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II QuickWrite (one per student)
  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II QuickWrite Teacher Guide (answers; for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Gist (6 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit with their Okinawa discussion partner. Then, have them discuss the gist of the sources in the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet. Encourage students to refer to the packet as they share with each other.
  • After 4 minutes, cold call several pairs to share the gist of each source. Make a note of sources that students struggle with; plan to focus on these sources during the Text-Dependent Questions Review during Work Time A.
  • Giving students time to talk through ideas supports comprehension and builds class culture.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Explain that students will continue working with the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet today.
  • Read the learning targets aloud as students read along silently:

* "I can use primary source documents to build background knowledge about the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII."

* "I can explain how World War II affected American society."

* "I can cite evidence to analyze primary sources for disagreements about Japanese-American internment during WWII."

  • Tell students to turn and talk with their partner about what they think they will be doing during today's lesson.
  • After a moment, ask for a volunteer to share his or her idea. Listen for: "Comparing the primary sources to decide how they disagree about Japanese-American internment."

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Primary Sources: Text-Dependent Questions Review (10 minutes)

  • Tell students it's important to make sure they understand the primary sources from yesterday's lesson before jumping into the next step of analysis: comparing the sources to each other to find disagreements between them. Cold call students to share responses to the text-dependent questions in the packet. Listen for them to accurately share the point of view as well as back up their answers with textual evidence. Use this time to clarify misunderstandings and help students understand the more complex sources in the packet. (See the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment During World War II packet, Teacher Guide for ideas on how students might answer these questions.)
  • Before moving on to the next step, ask students to use the Fist to Five protocol to rate their understanding of the sources in the packet. Make a note of students who rate themselves low and plan to follow up with them during the partner work time later in this lesson.
  • Consider giving students who struggle to participate advance notice about which question(s) you want them to answer during this review.

B. Analyzing Primary Sources: Conflicting Accounts (25 minutes)

  • Show students the large versions of primary sources posted around the room. Point out that Source 8 (Mine Okubo Quotes) was not in yesterday's packet; all of the quotes on that page are from "The Life of Mine Okubo." Explain that students will work with their partners to find places where these sources disagree about Japanese-American internment, but you will do a think-aloud to model the steps you'd like them to take.
  • Explain that your first step is to identify two sources that disagree about Japanese-American internment. Since you have already read the sources and answered the text-dependent questions about point of view, you know that Source 1 and Source 2 disagree.
  • Ask for a volunteer to remind the class of the gist of Source 1. Listen for: "Source 1 argues that Japanese-Americans are secretly planning to attack the United States."
  • Ask for another volunteer to give the gist of Source 2. Listen for: "Source 2 argues that Japanese-Americans are not planning to attack the United States." Reiterate that Source 1 and Source 2 disagree because they communicate opposing ideas about Japanese-Americans.
  • Display the Source Comparison strips on the document camera.Tell students you will write your ideas on it, then post it on the wall. Explain that both partners will fill in identical Source Comparison strips. One strip will be posted under each source compared on the strip. (Consider asking for a volunteer "partner" to fill in a second strip while you do the think-aloud.)
  • On the top box of the strip, write: "Source 1 disagrees with Source 2 about Japanese-Americans being a threat." 
  • Explain that next you will find evidence to prove that these two sources disagree. Choose a piece of evidence from Source 1 and write it into the left-hand "Source ___ says" box of the Source Comparison strip. (Consider using "The enemy alien problem on the Pacific coast, or much more accurately the Fifth Column problem, is very serious and it is very special.")
  • Say something like: "Now I need to find evidence that shows how Source 2 disagrees with Source 1." Choose a piece of evidence from Source 2 and write it into the right-hand "Source ___ says" box on the Source Comparison strip. (Consider using "There will be no armed uprising of Japanese.") 
  • Tape your completed Source Comparison strip to the wall beneath Source 1. (If a student volunteer filled in a second strip for you, tape that beneath Source 2. If not, remind students that their partner's strip would go beneath Source 2.)
  • Briefly review the steps you followed to complete the Source Comparison strip:

1. Use the notes in your Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet to identify two primary sources that disagree.

2. Fill in these two sources' numbers, and the topic they disagree about, at the top of the Source Comparison strip.

3. Find one piece of evidence from each source that proves they disagree.

4. Post your strip on the wall beneath the two sources you compared.

  • Tell students that each pair will receive six blank Source Comparison strips and should come up with new disagreements among the sources.
  • Distribute six Source Comparison strips to each pair. Circulate while they work. Check in with pairs to ensure that they understand the steps and are finding strong evidence.
  • With 3 minutes remaining, refocus students whole group. Cold call several pairs to share out disagreements that they found among the texts.
  • Ask:

* "Based on everything we have learned about World War II so far, why do you think these different sources disagree about Japanese-American internment?"

  • Listen for connections to this module's guiding questions and big ideas: "How do historians/readers reconcile multiple accounts of the same event?", "How does war (and conflict) affect individuals and societies?", and/or "There are important yet divergent experiences in war and conflict."
  • Tell students they will continue comparing these sources during the next lesson, focusing on the different methods (text, pictures, etc.) people choose to communicate their ideas.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Preview Homework (2 minutes)

  • Distribute the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment During World War II QuickWrite, keeping a copy of Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II QuickWrite Teacher Guide.
  • Preview the homework.

Homework

Homework
  • Reread the primary source documents from today's lesson and complete the QuickWrite.

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