Building Background Knowledge: The Internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII, Part 2 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U2:L6

Building Background Knowledge: The Internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII, Part 2

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use primary source documents to build background knowledge about the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII.
  • I can explain how World War II affected American society.
  • I can cite evidence to determine an author's point of view in a primary source. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • "The Life of Mine Okubo" structured notes, focus question and vocabulary (from homework)
  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Reader: Discussing the Focus Question and Vocabulary (8 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Understanding Primary Sources (34 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Preview Homework (1 minute)

4. Homework

A. Finish reading the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet. Answer the text-dependent questions for each source.

  • This is the second of four lessons in which students enrich their understanding of Unbroken's historical context by building background knowledge about Japanese-American internment and the effects of war on individuals and society during WWII. Today's lesson focuses on analyzing the points of view in several conflicting primary sources about internment. In Lesson 7, students will analyze these sources for disagreements among them. These primary source documents are rich in language and content. Students will have the opportunity to reread and analyze these texts over the course of several lessons.
  • Consider collaborating with a social studies teacher to provide deeper study of the primary source documents used in this lesson.
  • Post: Learning targets

Vocabulary

primary source; sabotage, espionage (Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet)

Materials

  •  "The Life of Mine Okubo" Structured Notes Teacher Guide (for teacher reference; from Lesson 4)
  • Dictionaries (one per pair of students)
  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet (one per student)
  • Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet, Teacher Guide (for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Focus Question and Vocabulary (8 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit with their Iwo Jima discussion partner. Have them discuss the focus question from Lesson 5 homework ("The Life of Mine Okubo" structured notes).
  • After 3 minutes, cold call several pairs to share their best ideas and evidence for the focus question. (See "The Life of Mine Okubo" Structured Notes Teacher Guide, from Lesson 4,for more details.)
  • Next, give students the following directions for sharing their self-selected vocabulary words from "The Life of Mine Okubo" with their partners. (Tell students that the partner whose birthday comes first in the year will share first.)

1. Share one of the vocabulary words you selected from "The Life of Mine Okubo," and show your partner where the word appears in the text.

2. Tell your partner what you think the word means, based on context clues.

3. Your partner then looks up the word in the dictionary and reads the definition to you.

4. Together, revise your definition if necessary.

5. Repeat with the other partner sharing a word. Continue sharing words until the time is up.

  • As students share words and revise definitions, circulate and monitor. Encourage students to create their own definitions using both context clues and the dictionary definitions.
  • After a few minutes, refocus students whole group. Cold call several students to share out new vocabulary words and definitions from the text. 
  • Giving students time to talk through ideas supports comprehension and builds a strong and positive class culture. 

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets. Read the learning targets aloud:

* "I can use primary source documents to build background knowledge about the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII."

* "I can explain how World War II affected American society."

* "I can cite evidence to determine an author's point of view in a primary source."

  • Ask for a volunteer to explain what a primary source is. Listen for: "A primary source is an original text or artifact that was created during the time period you are studying." (If students struggle to remember this definition, remind them that they have already read some primary sources during this module, including the Day of Infamy speech and the Fourteen-Part Message. Prompt them to explain why these two documents are primary sources, while Unbroken is not.)
  • Tell students they will examine several primary sources created during World War II to learn more about Japanese-American internment and the way that war affected American society. These sources have different points of view on internment, and students should pay close attention to the ways that the authors of the sources disagree. Remind students that they practiced this skill when they prepared for the Fishbowl discussion about the Day of Infamy speech and the Fourteen-Part Message in Unit 1.
  • Cold call a student to remind the class:

* "How did these two documents' perspectives differ?"

  • Listen for the student to explain that both documents were about the escalation of Japanese-American conflict before and during World War II, but they disagreed on which country was primarily responsible for this escalation.
  • Ask for a volunteer to explain:

* "How might using these primary sources help us meet the second learning target ('I can explain how World War II affected American society') in a way that Unbroken might not be able to?"

  • Listen for: "These sources give the perspective of what was happening at home in America while Louie was away at war."

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Understanding Primary Sources (34 minutes)

  • Distribute the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet, keeping one Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet, Teacher Guide (for teacher reference). Briefly review the content of the packet with students; point out each source's title, embedded vocabulary words, and the text-dependent questions that follow. Tell students that, even though some of the sources aren't traditional texts, they can still analyze them by looking carefully at their words and images and making inferences about what they see. Tell students that they will spend the rest of today's class, as well as tonight for homework, completing this packet.
  • Direct students to begin by completing a first read of the packet with their partners, then writing the gist of each source in the margin. Let them know that, when they have finished reading for the gist, they should reread the sources and begin answering the text-dependent questions. Remind students that these are challenging texts, so they will probably need to reread and discuss sections with their partner, and it is okay if they do not finish today.
  • As students work, circulate and check to be sure they are rereading and citing evidence to support their answers.
  • Consider making a shortened version of this packet for struggling readers or students who need more time to process. This version might include Sources 1, 2, 4, and 6. Pair students using this version of the packet with one another.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Preview Homework (1 minute)

  • Explain that the next lesson focuses on comparing the sources to each other, so it's important that students understand the gist and point of view of each source. Tell students to finish the packet for tonight's homework.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish reading the Primary Sources: Japanese-American Internment during World War II packet. Answer the text-dependent questions for each source.

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