Analyzing a Thematic Concept: Becoming Visible after Captivity (pages 334–344) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U2:L18

Analyzing a Thematic Concept: Becoming Visible after Captivity (pages 334–344)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.8.1)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or a central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)

Supporting Targets

  • I can recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.
  • I can analyze the development of a thematic concept in Unbroken.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 334-344 (from homework)
  • Double Arrow Visibility graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Language Techniques (15 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing the Thematic Concept: Becoming Visible after Captivity (28 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Preview Homework (1 minute)

4. Homework

A. Read pages 345-353 in Unbroken and complete the structured notes.

  • Students work with active and passive voice and the conditional and subjunctive moods in this lesson to determine the correct voice or mood to use. This language standard is highlighted on the NYS standards as one that must be revisited throughout eighth grade and high school as students become more sophisticated writers.
  • In this lesson, students further analyze the thematic concept of becoming visible after captivity, which was introduced in Lesson 17.
  • Post: Learning targets

Vocabulary

dignity

Materials

  • Sentence Voice and Mood handout (one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Dignity word web (from Lesson 3; one to display)
  • Becoming Visible Again anchor chart (from Lesson 17; students' copies)
  • Double Arrow Visibility graphic organizer (one per student and one to display)
  • Unbroken (book; one per student)
  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 345-353 (one per student)
  • Unbroken supported structured notes, pages 345-353 (optional; only for students who need more support)
  • Unbroken Structured Notes Teacher Guide, pages 345-353 (for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Language Techniques (15 minutes)

  • Students should sit with their Pearl Harbor discussion partners. Distribute and display the Sentence Voice and Moodhandout.
  • Remind students that they have learned about some different types of sentences--active, passive, conditional, and subjunctive. Explain that they have learned how to identify the different voices and moods of sentences, and how authors use them to help the reader make meaning, but today they are going to work on determining which type of sentence would be correct or appropriate to use.
  • Direct students' attention to the first section on the handout. Invite them to think about what the active and passive voice indicate, then jot down their answers and share with their partner. Circulate and monitor.
  • When students finish, cold call pairs to share their thinking. Listen for answers like: "Active voice indicates that the subject is 'doing' the action; passive voice indicates that the subject is being acted upon."
  • Remind students that sentences in the active voice are generally easier to comprehend. Most sentences are written this way, but we studied some sentences in Unbroken that were written in the passive voice. Invite students to think about why Hillenbrand sometimes uses passive voice, then turn and talk with their partner.
  • Cold call pairs to share their thinking. Listen for responses that indicate that Hillenbrand uses the passive voice to show Louie or the other POWs being acted upon by their captors or outside forces.
  • Direct students' attention to the first set of numbered examples. Explain that each pair of sentences includes passive and active voice. Students will use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to decide which sentence is easier to understand and conveys meaning in the clearest way. They will then explain their thinking on the line provided.
  • Circulate and monitor while students complete the four examples. Cold call pairs to share their answers. Students should identify the active voice as the preferable choice for the majority of the sentences because they are easier to comprehend. However, for Pairs 1 and 2, the passive could also be appropriate if the author is trying to emphasize The Green Hornet and/or the raft. Explain that this sort of judgment about when to use active and passive voice is part of the learning target.
  • Ask students to think about the last question about active and passive voice, write their answer, and share with a partner. Cold call pairs to share their thinking. Listen for answers such as: "It is important to think about what you want to emphasize--the one doing the action, or the one being acted upon."
  • Next, direct students' attention to the second section of the handout. Invite them to think about what the conditional and subjunctive mood indicate, then jot down their answers and share with their partner. Circulate and monitor.
  • When students finish, cold call pairs to share their thinking. Listen for answers such as the following: The conditional indicates a state in which something is likely to happen. The subjunctive indicates "wishful thinking" or things that will never be true.
  • Remind students that the subjunctive is not often used in English and key words for the conditional are might, could, and would. Explain that being able to choose the correct verb tense or conditional word is also part of today's learning target. Direct their attention to the four examples. Invite students to think about the correct verb tense or conditional verb needed to complete each sentence, jot down their answers, and share with their partner. Circulate and monitor.
  • When students finish, cold call pairs to share their thinking.
  • Responses:

1. "could" or "might"--a pilot making a mistake could make a plane crash. "Would" is incorrect because planes do not always crash if pilots make mistakes.

2. "were"--this is the subjunctive, as it was uncertain that Louie would survive

3. "would"--in this case, the conditions in the POW camps are so awful that some men would die. Could and might indicate some doubt.

4. "could," "would," or "might"--any of these would be correct based on students' explanations.

  • Ask students to think about the last questions on conditional and subjunctive mood, write their answer, and share with a partner.
  • Cold call students to share their thinking. Listen for responses such as: Subjunctive mood is really for things that are wished. Conditional mood is used to indicate likely outcomes or effects.
  • Consider a partially completed graphic organizer for students who struggle.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • Read aloud the first learning target:

* "I can recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood."

  • Give students specific positive feedback on this learning target.
  • Read aloud the second learning target:

*  "I can analyze the development of a thematic concept in Unbroken."  

  • Tell students they will now learn more about the theme of becoming visible after captivity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Thematic Concept: Becoming Visible after Captivity (28 minutes)

  • Have students share with their partner the answer to the focus question from homework: 

* "'When the harsh push of memory ran through Louie, reaching for his flask became as easy as slapping a swatter on a fly.' What is happening to Louie? Why?"

  • Cold call student pairs to share their answers and listen for students to say something like: Louie has trouble dealing with his life. He doesn't have a way to cope with his life now that he is free. He has been relying more and more on soothing his pain, anxiety, and fears with alcohol. Drinking is an easy solution for Louie because it helps him escape his reality.
  • Using a document camera, display the Dignity word web, and ask students to read over the language Hillenbrand uses to describe dignity and the lack of dignity earlier in the book. (Dignity is described as: self-respect, sense of self-worth, innermost armament of the soul, the heart of humanness; the lack of dignity is described as: dehumanized; cleaved from, cast below mankind; profound wretchedness; loneliness; hope is almost impossible to retain; identity is erased; defined by their captors; defined by their circumstances, humiliation, degradation.)
  • Have students take out their copy of the Becoming Visible Again anchor chart. Have the student pairs read over both documents.
  • Ask students:

* "Based on the question you answered for homework, what language or related language from this web and anchor chart would you use to describe Louie at this point?" 

  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share. Listen for them to say that Louie seems lonely, hopeless, defined by his circumstances, etc.  
  • Distribute the Double Arrow Visibility graphic organizer to students and display using a document camera. Remind students that there are two aspects to becoming visible again: dignity and reconnecting. Ask:

* "On Louie's journey to becoming visible, is he making stronger progress on the dignity aspect or the reconnecting aspect?" 

  • Listen for students to note that Louie is making progress reconnecting with the outside world, and he seems to be losing ground with the dignity aspect of visibility. Do not probe deeper for evidence; students will search for evidence from the text next.
  • Write "Reconnecting" on the arrow pointing to the top of the page and "Dignity" on the arrow point toward the bottom of the page, and have students do the same on their copies. Explain to students that they will find evidence from the text (pages 334-344) showing how Louie is becoming visible or not by finding examples related to reconnecting and dignity. They should write these examples on the lines provided. (For example, based on the answer to the focus question from homework, this would be evidence of Louie losing ground on his journey back to dignity.)
  • Provide time for students to work on this with their partner, and bring the whole class together to add the evidence to the graphic organizer.
  • Ask students:

* "Do you notice any sort of pattern to Louie's journey?" 

  • If necessary, probe deeper by asking: "What's happening to Louie as he makes progress reconnecting--what happens to the dignity side?" Listen for students to notice that he is a very public person, since he travels delivering inspirational speeches. On the other hand, the more he increases his visibility by reconnecting with family and friends, the more he spins out of control. The dignity side loses ground as his reconnecting increases.
  • Remind students that this was not going to be an easy journey for Louie. Explain that Louie has been through so many terrible things. Ask students to predict:

* "What do you predict will be the outcome of his life? Will he ever complete the journey back to complete visibility?" 

  • A clue to this may be the title of the book.
  • Graphic organizers engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning. For students needing additional support, consider providing a partially filled-in graphic organizer.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Preview Homework (1 minute)

  • Distribute the Unbroken structured notes, pages 345-353, as well as the Unbroken supported structured notes, pages 345-353 as needed, keeping a copy of the Unbroken Structured Notes Teacher Guide, pages 345-353. Read the focus question aloud:

* "Holocaust survivor Jean Amery described "a seething, purifying thirst for revenge" that some men experienced after being imprisoned in Nazi concentration camps. How is Louie an example of what Amery describes?"  

Homework

Homework
  • Read pages 345-353 in Unbroken and complete the structured notes.

Teaching Note:

After collecting students' draft informational essays at the beginning of the lesson, assess the drafts for "Content and Analysis" and "Command of Evidence" on the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. By Lesson 19, be prepared to return students' drafts with feedback and the scored rubric.

  • For assessment purposes on students' first draft, focus on just the top two rows of the rubric. But also give feedback on the "Coherence, Organization, and Style" and "Control of Conventions" for students to revise in Lesson 19. Specifically, keep an eye out for mistakes that relate to the following learning targets:

* "I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader." (L.8.2) (This essay is meant to assess L.8.2c: Spell correctly. Give students feedback on their spelling.)"

* "I can intentionally use verbs in active and passive voice and in the conditional and subjunctive mood." (L.8.3) (Focus your feedback on active and passive voice; subjunctive and conditional moods will be assessed in Unit 3.)

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