Character Analysis: Resilience | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U2:L12

Character Analysis: Resilience

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (L.8.5)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the Hillenbrand's word choice in Unbroken and how it contributes to the meaning of the text.
  • I can analyze the thematic concept of invisibility in Unbroken.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 230-247(from homework)
  • Word Choice note-catcher
  • Gathering Textual Evidence note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Things Good Writers Do: Author's Word Choice (8 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

2. Work Time

A. Studying Theme (20 minutes)

B. Gathering Evidence Note-Catcher (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Preview Homework (1 minute)

B. Return Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read pages 248-253, summary of pages 253-258, "Louie's letter" on pages 256-257, pages 259-261, in Unbroken. Complete the structured notes and answer the focus question, "In what ways does Louie continue to resist invisibility?"

  • In this lesson, students continue to analyze author's word choice as they study a passage in Unbroken. Students will apply this study of word choice when they choose their own concrete, specific, and nuanced words as they write their essay in their End of Unit 2 Assessment.
  • Students also continue to study the thematic concept of resisting invisibility. They add the information gained in this lesson to the Gathering Textual Evidence note-catcher, which they are completing as they prepare to use the strongest evidence they collect in the end of unit essay.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

vivid

Materials

  • Unbroken (book; one per student)
  • Word Choice note-catcher (one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Word Choice note-catcher (one for display)
  • Theme note-catcher (one per student)
  • Theme note-catcher (for teacher reference and display)
  • Gathering Textual Evidence note-catcher (from Lesson 3)
  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 248-261 (one per student)
  • Unbroken supported structured notes, pages 248-261 (optional; only for students who need more support)
  • Unbroken Structured Notes Teacher Guide, pages 248-261 (for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Things Good Writers Do: Author's Word Choice (8 minutes)

  • Have students sit with their Midway discussion partner. Ask them to take out their Unbroken books, and turn to page 230, the third paragraph starting with: "He was a beautifully crafted man ..."
  • Tell students that Hillenbrand provides details about Watanabe or the Bird by using carefully chosen and vivid or rich words. In this case, these words help the reader understand more about this man. Have students independently reread this paragraph and then turn and talk with their partner to share the gist of the paragraph.
  • Next, distribute the Word Choice note-catcher. Orient them to the document and explain that in pairs, students will select words and phrases that are vivid, descriptive, and interesting from this paragraph. Next, they will explain how the words they have chosen help them understand Watanabe better. Invite them to begin.
  • After several minutes, use a document camera to display the Word Choice note-catcher (one for display). Cold call several student pairs to add words to the note-catcher.
  • Then cold call several student pairs to describe how the author's word choice helps them understand Watanabe better.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • Cold call a student to read aloud the first learning target:

* "I can analyze the Hillenbrand's word choice in Unbroken and how it contributes to the meaning of the text." Congratulate students for closely reading the text to notice Hillenbrand's word choice and how these words and phrases help them understand Watanabe better.

  • Cold call another student to read aloud the second learning target:

* "I can analyze the theme concept of resisting invisibility in Unbroken." 

  • Ask students to give a thumbs-up to indicate whether these targets seem familiar; students should see that these targets build naturally on their work from the past few days.
  • Explain to students that today they continue to look at ways the Japanese guards tried to make American POWs invisible through dehumanization and isolation, as well as ways the POWs resisted these efforts.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Studying Theme (20 minutes)

  • Distribute the Theme note-catcher. Assign each pair of students one row (three questions) of the note-catcher. (More than one group will have the same set of three questions.)
  • Note: This is not a pass-the-paper activity. Each student should write on his or her own note-catcher. They must listen, process, and summarize.
  • Give directions:
  • Part 1:

1.You and your partner answer just the three questions on your row.

2.Take 10 minutes as a pair to read your three questions, reread the text, and jot your answers.

  • Part 2:

1.Walk around the room to talk with students from other pairs. Bring your notes and text with you.

2.Ask each person to explain one and only one answer.

3.Listen to the explanation and then summarize that answer in your own box.

4.Record the name of the student who shared the information on the line in the question box.

5.Repeat, moving on to another student for an answer to another question. (Ask a different person for each answer so you interact with six students total.)

  • Have students begin Part 1 with their partner. Circulate to listen in and support as needed. Probe, pushing students to dig back into the text to find answers to each question.
  • After 10 minutes, focus students whole group. Begin Part 2; give them about 7 minutes to circulate.
  • Then ask students to return to their seats and refocus whole group.
  • Using a document camera, display the Theme note-catcher (for teacher reference and display) so students can check their answers.
  • Students will be able to use the Theme note-catcher for the Gathering Evidence note-catcher in Part B.

B. Gathering Evidence Note-catcher (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to work independently to select the strongest evidence from their Theme note-catcher and add it to the first four columns of the Gathering Textual Evidence Note-catcher. Remind students that they will be using this information for their informational essay. They are gathering a lot of evidence that will help them write about this text effectively!
  • Consider having students who struggle with on-demand writing to talk with a partner before they respond to the question in writing.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Preview Homework (1 minute)

  • Distribute the Unbroken structured notes, pages 248-261, as well as the Unbroken supported structured notes, pages 248-261, keeping a copy of the Unbroken Structured Notes Teacher Guide, pages 248-261 (for teacher reference).
  • Preview the homework. Point out that has been the case with other assignments, they will read only some pages of the longer assigned section. Read the focus question aloud:

* "How is Louie resisting invisibility or is he?"

B. Return Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Return students' Mid-Unit 2 Assessments with your feedback. Congratulate them on closely looking at the way different mediums convey ideas and for recognizing that some mediums are stronger than others for conveying certain ideas.
  • Give students a moment to look over their assessments. Address clarifying questions as time permits.

Homework

Homework
  • Read pages 248-253, summary of pages 253-258, "Louie's letter" on pages 256-257, pages 259-261, in Unbroken. Complete the structured notes and answer the focus question, "In what ways does Louie continue to resist invisibility?"

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