Analyzing Author’s Craft: Analyzing Hillenbrand’s Language Techniques | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U2:L11

Analyzing Author’s Craft: Analyzing Hillenbrand’s Language Techniques

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can intentionally use verbs in active and passive voice and in the conditional and subjunctive mood. (L.8.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can determine if sentences are in the conditional and subjunctive mood.
  • I can analyze Hillenbrand's use of the conditional and subjunctive mood in her writing.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 200-229 (from homework)
  • Written Conversation
  • Conditional and Subjunctive Mood handout

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Written Conversation (12 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing Voice: Conditional and Subjunctive Mood (15 minutes)

B. Author's Craft Things Good Writers Do (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview Homework (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read 230-234, skip 235-237 (top), avoid 236, read pages 237-238, 239-242, and the summary of pages 242-244, read 244-247 and complete the structured notes.

  • In this lesson, students learn about conditional and subjunctive mood to analyze how authors use a variety of sentence types to enhance meaning and add to the Things Good Writers Do note-catcher. This will be assessed in Unit 3; students will be expected to apply the conditional and subjunctive moods when writing their narratives.
  • See Work Time A for a distinction between mood and verb tense.  The Common Core State Standards refer to conditional and subjunctive as moods.  Moods can be indicated using various verb tenses, and are not limited to present or past tense, for example. (For more information, see http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/539/07/).
  • Throughout Unbroken, there are many examples of both the conditional and subjunctive mood.  While the subjunctive is a rarely used mood in American English, Hillenbrand sometimes uses it to show the wishes or hopes, however unlikely, of  Louie, other imprisoned men, and families on the home front.  She sometimes uses the conditional when to making logical inferences in order to embellish and enrich the story. For example, she uses her imagination to show how people might react or what they might think in certain situations.
  • These examples can serve as additional support for students who are struggling with this concept.
  • Review: Written Conversation protocol (see Appendix).
  • Post: Learning targets

Vocabulary

conditional mood, subjunctive mood

Materials

  • Written Conversation note-catcher (one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Conditional and Subjunctive Mood handout (one per student)
  • Unbroken (book; one per student)
  • Things Good Writers Do anchor chart (from Unit 1)
  • Things Good Writers Do note-catcher (from Unit 1)
  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 230-247 (one per student)
  • Unbroken supported structured notes, pages 230-247 (optional; only for students who need more support)
  • Unbroken Structured Notes Teacher Guide, pages 230-247 (for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Written Conversation (12 minutes)

  • Ask students to sit with their Pearl Harbor partners. Distribute the Written Conversation note-catcher and display a copy on the document camera.
  • Review the Written Conversation protocol. Remind students that in a written conversation, they write simultaneous notes to their partner about the reading selection, swapping them every 2 minutes for a total of two silent exchanges back and forth. They are to write for the whole time allotted for each note, putting down words, phrases, questions, connections, ideas, wonderings--anything related to the passage or responding to what their partner has said, just as they would in an out-loud conversation. Spelling and grammar do not count; these are just notes. However, these notes do need to be focused and text-based.
  • Display the Written Conversation prompt:

* "The men imprisoned at Ofuna participate in small acts of rebellion and subversion. In what ways do they rebel? What is the effect of these acts on the prisoners?"

  • Ask students to begin. Signal transitions about every 2 minutes.
  • Once the exchanges are done, cold call pairs to share an important observation or idea from their written conversation. Encourage other students to build off those ideas in a classroom discussion. 

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to posted learning targets. Read the learning targets out loud:

* "I can determine if sentences are in the conditional and subjunctive mood."

* "I can analyze Hillenbrand's use of the conditional and subjunctive mood in her writing."

  • Tell students that they will be introduced to two more types of sentences to build upon their understanding of sentence types and structures and how those sentences help the reader make meaning

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Voice: Conditional and Subjunctive Mood (15 minutes)

  • Students should remain with their partner. Distribute the Conditional and Subjunctive Mood handout. Explain that conditional and subjunctive mood are two ways authors can structure sentences, and authors can use both moods to aid understanding.
  • Explain that conditional and subjunctive are not tenses; they are moods. A mood can take on a variety of tenses, and does not just have to be in the present or the past tense.
  • Cold call a student to read the definition of conditional mood.
  • Read the examples and explain that conditional mood is about things that are likely to happen, might happen, or could happen.
  • Cold call a student to read the definition of Subjunctive Mood. Read the examples and explain that the subjunctive is rarely used in English. We use the subjunctive to communicate things that are unlikely to happen or even imaginary. The key word "if" is used in the subjunctive.
  • Read the "TIP 1": Explain that wishful sentences call for the subjunctive mood of the verb "to be," which is "were" when using I, he, or she.
  • Read "TIP 2":Explain that sentences can be both conditional and subjunctive.
  • Invite students to work with their partner to practice identifying conditional and subjunctive sentences, using examples from Unbroken. Circulate and monitor.
  • When students are done, go over the answers.

1.conditional

2.subjunctive and conditional

3.subjunctive and conditional

4.subjunctive

5.subjunctive

6.conditional**

  • Focus on #6, which may confuse many students. Point out that even though #6 contains the word "if," those types of sentences are only the subjunctive mood if they represent wishful thinking or something unlikely. In this case, Phil actually could make a mistake, thus creating a situation in which the other men could actually die. 
  • When reviewing the graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.

B. Author's Craft: Things Good Writers Do (10 minutes)

  • Display the Things Good Writers Do anchor chart and ask students to take out their Things Good Writers Do note-catcher.
  • Invite students to choose examples from the Conditional and Subjunctive Mood handout to write as examples on their note-catcher, label the technique, and think:

* "Why might Hillenbrand have used that particular mood?"

  • Encourage students to find the sentences in the book and reread to determine the context and aid their thinking. Tell students that if they could easily search this book (for example, using an e-reader) they would find many examples of the conditional and subjunctive. 
  • Continue to probe:

* "Why might Hillenbrand have specifically chosen to use the subjunctive and conditional to tell Louie's story--and the story of many WWII airmen?"

  • Invite students to share their thinking with a partner. Circulate and monitor discussions. Consider probing questions like:

* "How does Hillenbrand use the conditional mood to help the reader understand the situations facing the men?"

* "How does Hillenbrand use the subjunctive to help the reader understand Louie and his fellow airmen?"

  • Cold call students to share with the class. Listen for responses such as: "the conditional shows what might have happened in a lot of different scenarios," "the subjunctive is for 'wishful thinking' or hopes, which Louie and his fellow prisoners had a lot of," "Hillenbrand tells stories other than Louie's and uses the conditional to show how things might have been different," etc.
  • Have students add to their note-catcher.
  • Add conditional and subjunctive mood to the Things Good Writers Do anchor chart. Record students' thinking in the second column. Continue to emphasize that Unbroken not only teaches us a lot about a topic, but also serves as a great example of powerful writing. They are studying Hillenbrand's techniques both to appreciate how they impact the meaning of the text, and also to think about what techniques they might use in their own writing (in Unit 3).
  • Additional modeling may be required. Modeling provides a clear vision of the expectation for students. The teacher may model by saying: "When I read the sentence on page 90, I see that Hillenbrand is showing the reader the dangerous reality of being a pilot during WWII. Phil's actions--any mistake or error--has the possibility of killing everyone on the plane."

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview Homework (5 minutes)

  • Read each learning target aloud and invite students to self-assess using the Fist to Five Checking for Understanding Technique. Take note of any students who are not comfortable with the second learning target, as they may need more support in this area.
  • Distribute the Unbroken structured notes, pages 230-247, as well as the Unbroken supported structured notes, pages 230-247, keeping a copy of Unbroken Structured Notes Teacher Guide, pages 230-247 (for teacher reference).
  • Read the focus question aloud:

* "What does Hillenbrand see as reasons the Bird is the way he is?"

Homework

Homework
  • Read 230-234, skip 235-237 (top), avoid 236, read pages 237-238, 239-242, and the summary of pages 242-244, read 244-247 and complete the structured notes.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up