Building Background Knowledge: The Pearl Harbor Attack: Unbroken, Pages 38–47 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U1:L7

Building Background Knowledge: The Pearl Harbor Attack: Unbroken, Pages 38–47

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use evidence from Unbroken that supports my understanding of the Pearl Harbor attack.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 38-47 (from homework)
  • Text-dependent questions from "Fourteen-Part Message" 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

 A. Engaging the Reader (5 minutes)

 B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

 A. Close Reading: War with Japan: Unbroken, Pages 38-47 (25 minutes)

 B. Read-aloud: "Fourteen-Part Message"(10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

 A. Debrief Learning Target (1 minutes)

 B. Preview Homework (2 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Reread the "Fourteen-Part Message." Record the gist in the spaces provided in the left-hand column and add vocabulary words of your choice to the vocabulary chart. 

  • In this lesson, students study how author Laura Hillenbrand presents the attack on Pearl Harbor in Unbroken. This lesson provides a strong connection between the supplemental, informational texts students have been analyzing and the central text.
  • In Lesson 6, students read a primary source document that explained the United States' perspective on the attack on Pearl Harbor. In this lesson, students read a primary source text from the Japanese perspective on the attack. An excerpted and abridged version of the Japanese "Fourteen-Part Message" is read aloud as students follow along in their heads. The speech will receive closer study in the next lesson.
  • In advance: Review Think-Write-Pair-Share protocol (see Appendix).
  • Post: Learning target.

Vocabulary

foreshadowing; tariffs, identity, divine, mandate, inferior, superior, destiny, imperial, indoctrination; desensitization (43), unmoored (44), bombardier (45)

Materials

  • Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption (one per student)
  • War with Japan: Unbroken, pages 38-47 (one per student)
  • Close Reading Guide: Unbroken Pages 38-47 (for teacher reference)
  • "Fourteen-Part Message" (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to take Unbroken and their Unbroken structured notes, pages 38-47  and sit with their Pearl Harbor Discussion Appointment partner. Ask them to reread the focus question and their response silently, then discuss their response with their partner.
  • Cold call two or three pairs to share the highlights of their discussion. Listen for them to recognize that important events that were happening in the world were going to directly affect Louie. Hillenbrand provides the information about Japan and Germany so the reader has the background knowledge needed to better understand how Louie's life might change.

B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning target.
  • Read the target aloud to the class:

*     "I can use evidence from Unbroken that supports my understanding of the Pearl Harbor attack."

  • Tell students that today they will take another look at the background Hillenbrand provides in Unbroken about the attack on Pearl Harbor and how the attack affected Louie.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Reading: War with Japan: Unbroken, Pages 38-47 (25 minutes)

  • Explain that students will continue to work with their Pearl Harbor partner. They will use the Think-Write-Pair-Share protocol to read and answer text-dependent questions about how Hillenbrand builds background knowledge about the looming war with Japan and how this might affect Louie.
  • Distribute one copy of War with Japan: Unbroken, pages 38-47 to each student.
  • Refer to the Close Reading Guide: Unbroken Pages 38-47 (for teacher reference) for explicit instructions on how to guide students through thinking about and answering the text-dependent questions on their War with Japan handout..
  • Text-dependent questions may be collected as a formative assessment.
  • Giving students time to talk through ideas supports comprehension and builds class culture.

B. Read-Aloud: "Fourteen-Part Message" (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that the governments of Japan and the United States had different perspectives on the Pearl Harbor attack. They have already studied the perspective of the U.S. government by reading and answering questions about FDR's "Day of Infamy" speech. Today, they will read a text from a different perspective.
  • Distribute one copy of Japan's "Fourteen-Part Message" to each student and display one copy using a document camera.
  • Ask students to look over the handout as you explain it using the displayed copy. Orient students by pointing out that, like the "Day of Infamy" speech handout, this handout contains sections of the "Fourteen-Part Message" speech, pulled-out vocabulary, and spaces for them to record the gist and answers to the text-dependent questions.
  • Eventually, they will complete the entire handout. For today, they will read along in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Tell students that with this first read, they are just getting the gist of what the Japanese government is saying.
  • Read the text aloud to the class. Invite students to turn and talk about the gist with their partner.
  • Cold call two or three student pairs to share their gist with the class. Listen to be sure they understand that Japan believed the attack on Pearl Harbor was justified and that the United States did several things to provoke Japan's attack.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief Learning Target (1 minute)

  • Direct students' attention back to the posted learning target. Reread it aloud to the class:

*     "I can use evidence from Unbroken that supports my understanding of the Pearl Harbor attack."

  • Using a Fist to Five, ask students to rate their ability to use evidence from the text to enhance their understanding of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

B. Preview Homework (2 minutes)

  • For homework, students will reread the "Fourteen-Part Message," record the gist, and add vocabulary words of their choice to the vocabulary chart.

Homework

Homework
  • Reread the "Fourteen-Part Message." Record the gist in the spaces provided in the left-hand column. Add vocabulary words of your choice to the vocabulary chart.

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